New Books in Anthropology http://newbooksinanthropology.com Just another New Books Network podcast Mon, 18 Jan 2016 15:14:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Copyright © New Books Network 2011 marshallpoe@gmail.com (New Books Network) marshallpoe@gmail.com (New Books Network) anthropology, anthropologists, socialscience, science, evolution, books 1440 http://newbooksnetwork.com/wp-content/nbn_square_logos/anthropology_300x300.png New Books in Anthropology http://newbooksinanthropology.com 144 144 Discussions with Anthropologists about their New Books Discussions with Anthropologists about their New Books anthropology, anthropologists, socialscience, science, evolution, books New Books Network New Books Network marshallpoe@gmail.com no no Aisha Durham, "Home With Hip Hop Feminism: Performances in Communication and Culture" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/18/aisha-durham-home-with-hip-hop-feminism-performances-in-communication-and-culture-peter-lang-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/18/aisha-durham-home-with-hip-hop-feminism-performances-in-communication-and-culture-peter-lang-2014/#comments Mon, 18 Jan 2016 15:14:04 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/18/aisha-durham-home-with-hip-hop-feminism-performances-in-communication-and-culture-peter-lang-2014/

Aisha Durham

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Is hip hop defined by its artists or by its audience? In Home With Hip Hop Feminism: Performances in Communication and Culture (Peter Lang, 2014) Aisha Durham returns hip hop scholarship to its roots by engaging in an ethnographic and auto-ethnographic approach to studying hip hop. Rooting her study in the Diggs Park Public Housing Project in Norfolk, Virginia, Durham examines what hip hop means to ordinary and everyday women who see themselves as hip hop, equals to the rappers and other artists who receive greater recognition and scholarly attention.

By focusing on gender and social class, Durham explores the sexual scripts that women find and negotiate within hip hop and how hip hop continually navigates socio-economic boundaries. She also considers how the very act of studying and writing about hip hop can turn a hip hop "insider" into an outsider. The book spends considerable attention looking at Queen Latifah and Beyoncé as key figures who both reinforce and interrogate dominant representations of African American women.

Aisha Durham is Associate Professor of Communication at the University of South Florida. Her research about Black popular culture explores the relationship between media representations and everyday life. She examines how controlling images or power-laden stereotypes are produced by media makers and interpreted by media audiences to make sense of blackness in the "post" era. She is co-editor of Home Girls Make Some Noise: Hip Hop Feminism Anthology (2007) and Globalizing Cultural Studies: Ethnographic Interventions in Theory, Method, and Policy (2007).

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/18/aisha-durham-home-with-hip-hop-feminism-performances-in-communication-and-culture-peter-lang-2014/feed/ 0 0:40:16 Aisha DurhamView on AmazonIs hip hop defined by its artists or by its audience? In Home With Hip Hop Feminism: Performances in Communication and Culture (Peter Lang, 2014) Aisha Durham returns hip hop scholarship to its roots by engaging in an et[...] Aisha DurhamView on AmazonIs hip hop defined by its artists or by its audience? In Home With Hip Hop Feminism: Performances in Communication and Culture (Peter Lang, 2014) Aisha Durham returns hip hop scholarship to its roots by engaging in an ethnographic and auto-ethnographic approach to studying hip hop. Rooting her study in the Diggs Park Public Housing Project in Norfolk, Virginia, Durham examines what hip hop means to ordinary and everyday women who see themselves as hip hop, equals to the rappers and other artists who receive greater recognition and scholarly attention. By focusing on gender and social class, Durham explores the sexual scripts that women find and negotiate within hip hop and how hip hop continually navigates socio-economic boundaries. She also considers how the very act of studying and writing about hip hop can turn a hip hop "insider" into an outsider. The book spends considerable attention looking at Queen Latifah and Beyoncé as key figures who both reinforce and interrogate dominant representations of African American women. Aisha Durham is Associate Professor of Communication at the University of South Florida. Her research about Black popular culture explores the relationship between media representations and everyday life. She examines how controlling images or power-laden stereotypes are produced by media makers and interpreted by media audiences to make sense of blackness in the "post" era. She is co-editor of Home Girls Make Some Noise: Hip Hop Feminism Anthology (2007) and Globalizing Cultural Studies: Ethnographic Interventions in Theory, Method, and Policy (2007). New Books Network no no
Ulla Berg, "Mobile Selves: Race, Migration, and Belonging in Peru and the U.S." http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/18/ulla-berg-mobile-selves-race-migration-and-belonging-in-peru-and-the-u-s-nyu-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/18/ulla-berg-mobile-selves-race-migration-and-belonging-in-peru-and-the-u-s-nyu-press-2015/#comments Mon, 18 Jan 2016 15:00:41 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/18/ulla-berg-mobile-selves-race-migration-and-belonging-in-peru-and-the-u-s-nyu-press-2015/

Ulla Berg

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Ulla Berg's new book Mobile Selves: Race, Migration, and Belonging in Peru and the U.S. (New York University Press, 2015) highlights the deeply historical and central role of migration as a strategy for social mobility, as well as its affect on the formation of identity, in the lived experiences of migrants from the central highlands of Peru. Documenting the aspirational, material, and moral forces that undergird the decision to enter the transnational labor stream, Dr. Berg examines the barriers to and "transgressiveness of Andean mobility." With the detail of a skilled ethnographer, Berg follows her subjects from the rural communities of the Mantaro Valley to the Peruvian urban centers of Lima and Huancayo, and finally, to U.S. destinations in Miami, Washington, D.C., and Patterson, N.J. Throughout this process, Berg argues that Andean migrants continually refashion themselves as modern and cosmopolitan as they seek to maintain connections to home while overcoming the obstacles of rural poverty, racialization, and government surveillance.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/18/ulla-berg-mobile-selves-race-migration-and-belonging-in-peru-and-the-u-s-nyu-press-2015/feed/ 0 1:11:39 Ulla BergView on AmazonUlla Berg's new book Mobile Selves: Race, Migration, and Belonging in Peru and the U.S. (New York University Press, 2015) highlights the deeply historical and central role of migration as a strategy for social mobility, as wel[...] Ulla BergView on AmazonUlla Berg's new book Mobile Selves: Race, Migration, and Belonging in Peru and the U.S. (New York University Press, 2015) highlights the deeply historical and central role of migration as a strategy for social mobility, as well as its affect on the formation of identity, in the lived experiences of migrants from the central highlands of Peru. Documenting the aspirational, material, and moral forces that undergird the decision to enter the transnational labor stream, Dr. Berg examines the barriers to and "transgressiveness of Andean mobility." With the detail of a skilled ethnographer, Berg follows her subjects from the rural communities of the Mantaro Valley to the Peruvian urban centers of Lima and Huancayo, and finally, to U.S. destinations in Miami, Washington, D.C., and Patterson, N.J. Throughout this process, Berg argues that Andean migrants continually refashion themselves as modern and cosmopolitan as they seek to maintain connections to home while overcoming the obstacles of rural poverty, racialization, and government surveillance. New Books Network no no
Abram de Swaan, "The Killing Compartments: The Mentality of Mass Murder" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/11/abram-de-swaan-the-killing-compartments-the-mentality-of-mass-murder-yale-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/11/abram-de-swaan-the-killing-compartments-the-mentality-of-mass-murder-yale-up-2015/#comments Mon, 11 Jan 2016 14:25:09 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/11/abram-de-swaan-the-killing-compartments-the-mentality-of-mass-murder-yale-up-2015/

Abram de Swaan

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For a couple of decades, scholars have moved toward a broad consensus that context, rather than ideology, is most important in pushing ordinary men and women to participate in mass murder.  The "situationist paradigm," as Abram de Swaan labels this, concludes from studies by psychologists, sociologists, historians and others, that individuals are malleable, easily influenced by their surroundings, easily enough that they can be moved to do things that, in other contexts, would be easily recognizable as morally bankrupt.

de Swaan rejects this conclusion.  He asserts instead that most people would not participate in mass murder without a much deeper set of framing events and incentives.  His book The Killing Compartments:  The Mentality of Mass Murder (Yale University Press, 2015) lays out an alternate theory for the participation of both regimes and individuals in cases of mass murder. de Swaan brings his decades of experience in sociology to bear in crafting  a thoughtful, well articulated and well-constructed argument.  In particular, he argues that we should place more weight on the life-histories of perpetrators than has been common in recent discussions.

As de Swaan points out early in the book, what is modern about  mass violence is not that it happens, but that we are embarrassed about it. This reminds us of the importance of the debate he has so vigorously engaged.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/11/abram-de-swaan-the-killing-compartments-the-mentality-of-mass-murder-yale-up-2015/feed/ 0 1:01:40 Abram de SwaanView on AmazonFor a couple of decades, scholars have moved toward a broad consensus that context, rather than ideology, is most important in pushing ordinary men and women to participate in mass murder.  The "situationist paradigm," a[...] Abram de SwaanView on AmazonFor a couple of decades, scholars have moved toward a broad consensus that context, rather than ideology, is most important in pushing ordinary men and women to participate in mass murder.  The "situationist paradigm," as Abram de Swaan labels this, concludes from studies by psychologists, sociologists, historians and others, that individuals are malleable, easily influenced by their surroundings, easily enough that they can be moved to do things that, in other contexts, would be easily recognizable as morally bankrupt. de Swaan rejects this conclusion.  He asserts instead that most people would not participate in mass murder without a much deeper set of framing events and incentives.  His book The Killing Compartments:  The Mentality of Mass Murder (Yale University Press, 2015) lays out an alternate theory for the participation of both regimes and individuals in cases of mass murder. de Swaan brings his decades of experience in sociology to bear in crafting  a thoughtful, well articulated and well-constructed argument.  In particular, he argues that we should place more weight on the life-histories of perpetrators than has been common in recent discussions. As de Swaan points out early in the book, what is modern about  mass violence is not that it happens, but that we are embarrassed about it. This reminds us of the importance of the debate he has so vigorously engaged. New Books Network no no
Barry Brown and Oskar Juhlin, "Enjoying Machines" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/06/barry-brown-and-oskar-juhlin-enjoying-machines-mit-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/06/barry-brown-and-oskar-juhlin-enjoying-machines-mit-2015/#comments Wed, 06 Jan 2016 06:00:56 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/06/barry-brown-and-oskar-juhlin-enjoying-machines-mit-2015/

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When we consider the television, we think not only about how it's used, but also it's impact on culture. The television, tv, telly, or tube, became popular in the West in the late 1940s and early 1950s and was seen as a form of entertainment and enjoyment for the family. Other "technology" that assists with leisure include things like rubber-soled shoes, books, and other digital devices. In their new book, Enjoying Machines (MIT 2015), Barry Brown and Oskar Juhlin, both scholars in the Stockholm University Mobile Life VINN Excellence Center, the success of a particular technology can be measured by how well it creates pleasure.

The authors argue that pleasure "is fundamentally social in nature," and that to understand how technology supports leisure it is important to "produce a more sophisticated definition" of enjoyment. To do this Brown and Juhlin embark on an ethnographic investigation of technology and enjoyment that combines the sociological study of activity and the study of human-machine interaction. Over the course of their examination, the authors are careful to consider both the positives – enjoyment – and negatives – addiction- in relation to devices. Ultimately, Enjoying Machines offers a model of enjoyment useful for better understanding how to design useful machines.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/06/barry-brown-and-oskar-juhlin-enjoying-machines-mit-2015/feed/ 0 0:33:31 View on AmazonWhen we consider the television, we think not only about how it's used, but also it's impact on culture. The television, tv, telly, or tube, became popular in the West in the late 1940s and early 1950s and was seen as a form of enterta[...] View on AmazonWhen we consider the television, we think not only about how it's used, but also it's impact on culture. The television, tv, telly, or tube, became popular in the West in the late 1940s and early 1950s and was seen as a form of entertainment and enjoyment for the family. Other "technology" that assists with leisure include things like rubber-soled shoes, books, and other digital devices. In their new book, Enjoying Machines (MIT 2015), Barry Brown and Oskar Juhlin, both scholars in the Stockholm University Mobile Life VINN Excellence Center, the success of a particular technology can be measured by how well it creates pleasure. The authors argue that pleasure "is fundamentally social in nature," and that to understand how technology supports leisure it is important to "produce a more sophisticated definition" of enjoyment. To do this Brown and Juhlin embark on an ethnographic investigation of technology and enjoyment that combines the sociological study of activity and the study of human-machine interaction. Over the course of their examination, the authors are careful to consider both the positives – enjoyment – and negatives – addiction- in relation to devices. Ultimately, Enjoying Machines offers a model of enjoyment useful for better understanding how to design useful machines. New Books Network no no
Sean McCloud, "American Possessions: Fighting Demons in the Contemporary United States" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/sean-mccloud-american-possessions-fighting-demons-in-the-contemporary-united-states-oxford-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/sean-mccloud-american-possessions-fighting-demons-in-the-contemporary-united-states-oxford-up-2015/#comments Tue, 05 Jan 2016 18:34:21 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/sean-mccloud-american-possessions-fighting-demons-in-the-contemporary-united-states-oxford-up-2015/

Sean McCloud

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Exorcisms and demons. In his new book American Possessions: Fighting Demons in the Contemporary United States (Oxford University Press, 2015), Sean McCloud argues that not only have such phenomena been on the rise in the last 30 or so years, they also reveal prominent tropes within the contemporary American religious landscape. More precisely, readers are introduced to the first in-depth study of demon fighting in the so-called "spiritual warfare" of Third Wave evangelical and Pentecostal Christianity, a movement that has global ramifications. McCloud examines Third Wave practices such deliverance rituals, spiritual housekeeping, and spiritual mapping. In short, demons are a central fact of life in the imagination of millions of Christians around the globe.

Sean McCloud is Associate Professor of Religion at University of North Carolina, Charlotte.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/sean-mccloud-american-possessions-fighting-demons-in-the-contemporary-united-states-oxford-up-2015/feed/ 0 0:46:44 Sean McCloudView on AmazonExorcisms and demons. In his new book American Possessions: Fighting Demons in the Contemporary United States (Oxford University Press, 2015), Sean McCloud argues that not only have such phenomena been on the rise in the l[...] Sean McCloudView on AmazonExorcisms and demons. In his new book American Possessions: Fighting Demons in the Contemporary United States (Oxford University Press, 2015), Sean McCloud argues that not only have such phenomena been on the rise in the last 30 or so years, they also reveal prominent tropes within the contemporary American religious landscape. More precisely, readers are introduced to the first in-depth study of demon fighting in the so-called "spiritual warfare" of Third Wave evangelical and Pentecostal Christianity, a movement that has global ramifications. McCloud examines Third Wave practices such deliverance rituals, spiritual housekeeping, and spiritual mapping. In short, demons are a central fact of life in the imagination of millions of Christians around the globe. Sean McCloud is Associate Professor of Religion at University of North Carolina, Charlotte. New Books Network no no
Mayanthi Fernando, "The Republic Unsettled: Muslim French and the Contradictions of Secularism" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/mayanthi-fernando-the-republic-unsettled-muslim-french-and-the-contradictions-of-secularism-duke-up-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/mayanthi-fernando-the-republic-unsettled-muslim-french-and-the-contradictions-of-secularism-duke-up-2014/#comments Tue, 05 Jan 2016 15:09:44 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/mayanthi-fernando-the-republic-unsettled-muslim-french-and-the-contradictions-of-secularism-duke-up-2014/

Mayanthi Fernando

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Mayanthi Fernando's The Republic Unsettled: Muslim French and the Contradictions of Secularism (Duke University Press, 2014) is an important and provocative book. Drawing on years of field work, the book makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the complex interactions between religion and politics in contemporary France. Considering the Islamic revival and public debates provoked initially by the "headscarf crisis" of the late 1980s, the book examines the ethical, social, and political lives of the Muslim French men and women whose religiosity is so often regarded as "incommensurable" with the democratic culture and politics of the nation.

Rather than churning existing conversations about Islam in France that tend to fixate on immigration and integration, The Republic Unsettled thinks through citizenship, exploring the ways Muslim French bring together Islam and the values of the secular-republican nation, articulating new ways of believing and living on both fronts. The book also examines attempts by the French state to regulate Islam in France, attempts that highlight the fractures and contradictions at the very heart of secularism and republican universalism. The Republic Unsettled moves between the experiences of Fernando's interlocutors, the examination of key debates, institutions, and laws concerning laicité in France, and the analysis of a range of public discourses on religion, gender, and sexuality in which Islam has figured centrally. An ethnographic study that is profoundly attentive to France's colonial past, the book is a model of a scholarship that is at once theoretical and politically engaged.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/mayanthi-fernando-the-republic-unsettled-muslim-french-and-the-contradictions-of-secularism-duke-up-2014/feed/ 0 1:00:32 Mayanthi FernandoView on AmazonMayanthi Fernando's The Republic Unsettled: Muslim French and the Contradictions of Secularism (Duke University Press, 2014) is an important and provocative book. Drawing on years of field work, the book makes a signif[...] Mayanthi FernandoView on AmazonMayanthi Fernando's The Republic Unsettled: Muslim French and the Contradictions of Secularism (Duke University Press, 2014) is an important and provocative book. Drawing on years of field work, the book makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the complex interactions between religion and politics in contemporary France. Considering the Islamic revival and public debates provoked initially by the "headscarf crisis" of the late 1980s, the book examines the ethical, social, and political lives of the Muslim French men and women whose religiosity is so often regarded as "incommensurable" with the democratic culture and politics of the nation. Rather than churning existing conversations about Islam in France that tend to fixate on immigration and integration, The Republic Unsettled thinks through citizenship, exploring the ways Muslim French bring together Islam and the values of the secular-republican nation, articulating new ways of believing and living on both fronts. The book also examines attempts by the French state to regulate Islam in France, attempts that highlight the fractures and contradictions at the very heart of secularism and republican universalism. The Republic Unsettled moves between the experiences of Fernando's interlocutors, the examination of key debates, institutions, and laws concerning laicité in France, and the analysis of a range of public discourses on religion, gender, and sexuality in which Islam has figured centrally. An ethnographic study that is profoundly attentive to France's colonial past, the book is a model of a scholarship that is at once theoretical and politically engaged. New Books Network no no
Carla Freeman, "Entrepreneurial Selves: Neoliberal Respectability and the Making of a Caribbean Middle Class" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/carla-freeman-entrepreneurial-selves-neoliberal-respectability-and-the-making-of-a-caribbean-middle-class-duke-university-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/carla-freeman-entrepreneurial-selves-neoliberal-respectability-and-the-making-of-a-caribbean-middle-class-duke-university-press-2014/#comments Tue, 05 Jan 2016 15:07:01 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/carla-freeman-entrepreneurial-selves-neoliberal-respectability-and-the-making-of-a-caribbean-middle-class-duke-university-press-2014/

Carla Freeman

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This marvelous ethnography traces one of the surprising outcomes of shifting neoliberal regimes in Barbados. As women find themselves leading entrepreneurial lives, they also find themselves engaging in a new range of emotions, both at work and at home. Carla Freeman's Entrepreneurial Selves: Neoliberal Respectability and the Making of a Caribbean Middle Class (Duke University Press, 2014) follows the lives of a number of female Barbadians and finds that the demands of the twenty-first century economy create practices of care, attention and intimacy that shape their working lives and their leisure lives, their relationships with families and spouses as well as co-workers, their moments of rest or consumption as well as of business. It's an important transformation that has reshaped the lives of many Barbadians, and Freeman observes and probes changing landscapes of emotion with a great deal of nuance.
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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2016/01/05/carla-freeman-entrepreneurial-selves-neoliberal-respectability-and-the-making-of-a-caribbean-middle-class-duke-university-press-2014/feed/ 0 0:50:36 Carla FreemanView on AmazonThis marvelous ethnography traces one of the surprising outcomes of shifting neoliberal regimes in Barbados. As women find themselves leading entrepreneurial lives, they also find themselves engaging in a new range of emot[...] Carla FreemanView on AmazonThis marvelous ethnography traces one of the surprising outcomes of shifting neoliberal regimes in Barbados. As women find themselves leading entrepreneurial lives, they also find themselves engaging in a new range of emotions, both at work and at home. Carla Freeman's Entrepreneurial Selves: Neoliberal Respectability and the Making of a Caribbean Middle Class (Duke University Press, 2014) follows the lives of a number of female Barbadians and finds that the demands of the twenty-first century economy create practices of care, attention and intimacy that shape their working lives and their leisure lives, their relationships with families and spouses as well as co-workers, their moments of rest or consumption as well as of business. It's an important transformation that has reshaped the lives of many Barbadians, and Freeman observes and probes changing landscapes of emotion with a great deal of nuance. New Books Network no no
Afaneh Najmabadi, "Professing Selves: Transsexuality and Same-Sex Desire in Contemporary Iran" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/afaneh-najmabadi-professing-selves-transsexuality-and-same-sex-desire-in-contemporary-iran-duke-up-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/afaneh-najmabadi-professing-selves-transsexuality-and-same-sex-desire-in-contemporary-iran-duke-up-2013/#comments Wed, 30 Dec 2015 21:10:14 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/afaneh-najmabadi-professing-selves-transsexuality-and-same-sex-desire-in-contemporary-iran-duke-up-2013/

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In her fascinating new book Professing Selves: Transsexuality and Same-Sex Desire in Contemporary Iran (Duke University Press, 2015), Afaneh Najmabadi, Professor of History and of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University, explores shifting meanings of transsexuality in contemporary Iran. By brilliantly combining historical and ethnographic inquiry, Najmabadi highlights the complex ways in which biomedical, psychiatric, and Islamic jurisprudential discourses and institutions conjoin to generate particular notions of acceptable and unacceptable sexuality. Moreover, she also shows some of the paradoxical ways in which state regulation enables certain possibilities and spaces for nonheteronormative sexuality in Iran. In our conversation, we talked about problems of translation involved in using Western categories in Gender and Sexuality Studies in the Iranian context, the certification process for sex change applicants in Iran, shifting conceptualizations of transsexuality overtime, continuities and ruptures seen in nonheteronormative masculinities in Tehran before and after the 1979 revolution, and the category of the narrative self. This multilayered book is at once lyrically written and theoretically exhilarating. It will be of much interest to students of gender and sexuality, Islamic law, religion and science, and of contemporary Iranian society. It will also make a wonderful choice for graduate and upper lever undergraduate courses on the same subjects.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/afaneh-najmabadi-professing-selves-transsexuality-and-same-sex-desire-in-contemporary-iran-duke-up-2013/feed/ 0 0:55:24 View on AmazonIn her fascinating new book Professing Selves: Transsexuality and Same-Sex Desire in Contemporary Iran (Duke University Press, 2015), Afaneh Najmabadi, Professor of History and of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard Un[...] View on AmazonIn her fascinating new book Professing Selves: Transsexuality and Same-Sex Desire in Contemporary Iran (Duke University Press, 2015), Afaneh Najmabadi, Professor of History and of Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality at Harvard University, explores shifting meanings of transsexuality in contemporary Iran. By brilliantly combining historical and ethnographic inquiry, Najmabadi highlights the complex ways in which biomedical, psychiatric, and Islamic jurisprudential discourses and institutions conjoin to generate particular notions of acceptable and unacceptable sexuality. Moreover, she also shows some of the paradoxical ways in which state regulation enables certain possibilities and spaces for nonheteronormative sexuality in Iran. In our conversation, we talked about problems of translation involved in using Western categories in Gender and Sexuality Studies in the Iranian context, the certification process for sex change applicants in Iran, shifting conceptualizations of transsexuality overtime, continuities and ruptures seen in nonheteronormative masculinities in Tehran before and after the 1979 revolution, and the category of the narrative self. This multilayered book is at once lyrically written and theoretically exhilarating. It will be of much interest to students of gender and sexuality, Islamic law, religion and science, and of contemporary Iranian society. It will also make a wonderful choice for graduate and upper lever undergraduate courses on the same subjects. New Books Network no no
Erik Linstrum , "Ruling Minds: Ruling Minds: Psychology in the British Empire" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/erik-linstrum-ruling-minds-psychology-in-the-british-empire-harvard-up-2016/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/erik-linstrum-ruling-minds-psychology-in-the-british-empire-harvard-up-2016/#comments Wed, 30 Dec 2015 19:54:17 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/erik-linstrum-ruling-minds-psychology-in-the-british-empire-harvard-up-2016/

Erik Linstrum

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In Ruling Minds: Psychology in the British Empire (Harvard University Press, 2016), Erik Linstrum examines how the field of psychology was employed in the service of empire.

Linstrum explores the careers of scientists sent to the South Pacific, India, and Africa to verify and define characteristics of white racial superiority. Far from confirming the inferiority of the colonized, psychologists exposed flaws in Britain's civilizing mission, often doubting or subverting its underlying assumptions. Linstrum exposes a fundamental tension between the authoritarian goals of state and the role of science, showing how expert knowledge could be adapted as a tool of colonization just as it could be undermined by scientific discovery.

Despite its critics, Linstrum shows how psychology mobilized to take part in Britain's counter-insurgency campaigns in Kenya and Malaya. Colonial administrators borrowed tools from psychology to conduct interrogations and suppress dissent. The colonial state attempted to cast doubt on the psychological maturity of the colonized, articulating Third World nationalism itself as a kind of pathology. Britain's representatives aimed to actively reshape thoughts and feelings in their quest to win "hearts and minds."

Linstrum's book challenges rigid definitions of scientists in the service of empire, complicating earlier narratives which portrayed psychologists as powerful supporters of colonial discourse. Psychology's intended role was to aid the technocratic administration of a waning empire. While attempting to make the colonized knowable and predictable, British psychologists unintentionally exposed the dysfunctions inherent in European society, challenging the notion of an irrational, inferior "other."

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/erik-linstrum-ruling-minds-psychology-in-the-british-empire-harvard-up-2016/feed/ 0 0:57:31 Erik Linstrum View on AmazonIn Ruling Minds: Psychology in the British Empire (Harvard University Press, 2016), Erik Linstrum examines how the field of psychology was employed in the service of empire. Linstrum explores the careers of scientists s[...] Erik Linstrum View on AmazonIn Ruling Minds: Psychology in the British Empire (Harvard University Press, 2016), Erik Linstrum examines how the field of psychology was employed in the service of empire. Linstrum explores the careers of scientists sent to the South Pacific, India, and Africa to verify and define characteristics of white racial superiority. Far from confirming the inferiority of the colonized, psychologists exposed flaws in Britain's civilizing mission, often doubting or subverting its underlying assumptions. Linstrum exposes a fundamental tension between the authoritarian goals of state and the role of science, showing how expert knowledge could be adapted as a tool of colonization just as it could be undermined by scientific discovery. Despite its critics, Linstrum shows how psychology mobilized to take part in Britain's counter-insurgency campaigns in Kenya and Malaya. Colonial administrators borrowed tools from psychology to conduct interrogations and suppress dissent. The colonial state attempted to cast doubt on the psychological maturity of the colonized, articulating Third World nationalism itself as a kind of pathology. Britain's representatives aimed to actively reshape thoughts and feelings in their quest to win "hearts and minds." Linstrum's book challenges rigid definitions of scientists in the service of empire, complicating earlier narratives which portrayed psychologists as powerful supporters of colonial discourse. Psychology's intended role was to aid the technocratic administration of a waning empire. While attempting to make the colonized knowable and predictable, British psychologists unintentionally exposed the dysfunctions inherent in European society, challenging the notion of an irrational, inferior "other." New Books Network no no
Sujey Vega, "Latino Heartland: Of Borders and Belonging in the Midwest" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/sujey-vega-latino-heartland-of-borders-and-belonging-in-the-midwest-nyu-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/sujey-vega-latino-heartland-of-borders-and-belonging-in-the-midwest-nyu-press-2015/#comments Wed, 30 Dec 2015 19:11:27 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/sujey-vega-latino-heartland-of-borders-and-belonging-in-the-midwest-nyu-press-2015/

Sujey Vega

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In Latino Heartland: Of Borders and Belonging in the Midwest (New York University Press, 2015), Sujey Vega Assistant Professor of Women and Gender Studies at Arizona State University, traces the way Latina/o Hoosiers established community and belonging in Central Indiana amongst the sharp rise in anti-immigrant/Mexican sentiment after the passage of the Border Protection, Antiterrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005 (H.R. 4437). Dr. Vega foregrounds her analysis by illuminating the "pathology of forgetting" practiced by the region's non-Hispanic White population as they have reimagined and celebrated the region's ethnic past through the lenses of whiteness and assimilation. Thus, despite their multigenerational presence in the region and regardless of immigration status, Latina/o Hoosiers are perpetually viewed as foreign and unassimilated by many of their White neighbors. Following the passage of H.R. 4437 by the 109th U.S. Congress in Dec. 2005, Dr. Vega explains how the discourses of illegality and nativism intermixed with the region's collective memory to "other" and "racialize" Latina/o Hoosiers as outside the bounds of community and belonging in America's Heartland. Examining religious practices, community celebrations, sporting events, and other forms of socialization, Professor Vega details the formation of ethnic belonging among Latina/o Hoosiers as they appropriated space and claimed membership in Greater Lafayette, Indiana. Amidst the anti-immigrant fervor of the day, Vega asserts that the establishment of ethnic belonging laid the groundwork for civic engagement and political activism as Latina/o Hoosiers participated in public demonstrations of solidarity and protest, like the Immigration Reform Protests that swept across the nation between March and May of 2006.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/sujey-vega-latino-heartland-of-borders-and-belonging-in-the-midwest-nyu-press-2015/feed/ 0 1:09:51 Sujey VegaView on AmazonIn Latino Heartland: Of Borders and Belonging in the Midwest (New York University Press, 2015), Sujey Vega Assistant Professor of Women and Gender Studies at Arizona State University, traces the way Latina/o Hoosiers establi[...] Sujey VegaView on AmazonIn Latino Heartland: Of Borders and Belonging in the Midwest (New York University Press, 2015), Sujey Vega Assistant Professor of Women and Gender Studies at Arizona State University, traces the way Latina/o Hoosiers established community and belonging in Central Indiana amongst the sharp rise in anti-immigrant/Mexican sentiment after the passage of the Border Protection, Antiterrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005 (H.R. 4437). Dr. Vega foregrounds her analysis by illuminating the "pathology of forgetting" practiced by the region's non-Hispanic White population as they have reimagined and celebrated the region's ethnic past through the lenses of whiteness and assimilation. Thus, despite their multigenerational presence in the region and regardless of immigration status, Latina/o Hoosiers are perpetually viewed as foreign and unassimilated by many of their White neighbors. Following the passage of H.R. 4437 by the 109th U.S. Congress in Dec. 2005, Dr. Vega explains how the discourses of illegality and nativism intermixed with the region's collective memory to "other" and "racialize" Latina/o Hoosiers as outside the bounds of community and belonging in America's Heartland. Examining religious practices, community celebrations, sporting events, and other forms of socialization, Professor Vega details the formation of ethnic belonging among Latina/o Hoosiers as they appropriated space and claimed membership in Greater Lafayette, Indiana. Amidst the anti-immigrant fervor of the day, Vega asserts that the establishment of ethnic belonging laid the groundwork for civic engagement and political activism as Latina/o Hoosiers participated in public demonstrations of solidarity and protest, like the Immigration Reform Protests that swept across the nation between March and May of 2006. New Books Network no no
Peter J. Gloviczki, "Journalism and Memorialization in the Age of Social Media" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/peter-j-gloviczki-journalism-and-memorialization-in-the-age-of-social-media-palgrave-macmillan-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/peter-j-gloviczki-journalism-and-memorialization-in-the-age-of-social-media-palgrave-macmillan-2015/#comments Wed, 30 Dec 2015 06:00:54 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/peter-j-gloviczki-journalism-and-memorialization-in-the-age-of-social-media-palgrave-macmillan-2015/

Peter J. Gloviczki

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Humans have coped with tragedy using ritual and memorials since the Neolithic era. Doka called a memorial a space invested with meaning, "set aside to commemorate an event such as a tragedy." Memorialization is a ritual of bereavement, the creation of a place, permanent or not, that facilitates the persistence of memory. This space allows for the restructuring of the social network between the living, those who create the memorial, and the dead, those for which the memorial is created.

Memorialization happens in both the analog and digital contexts. In fact, some now decline to recognize a distinction between the on- and offline worlds. In his new book, Journalism and Memorialization in the Age of Social Media (Palgrave MacMillan, 2015), Peter J. Gloviczki, an assistant professor at Coker College, conceptualizes online memorials as networked remembrance spaces. These social media posts and groups are "immediate, interactive and public and they function across a great distance." Online memorials are both user-driven – the users drive the conversations and are responsible for keeping up the sites – and story-driven – the sites are places where users tell stories related to the subject(s) of the memorial.

Thorough, fact-based journalism plays an important role in the maintenance of online memorials. According to Gloviczki, news reports provide the foundation for the discussion of events, as well as being central to making sense of those events. So significant is journalism for online memorials that, in some cases, a memorial will cease once coverage of that event ends. But many online memorials continue long after media interests concludes. The persistence of these sites demonstrates how online memorials "disrupt the notion of a finite end."

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/30/peter-j-gloviczki-journalism-and-memorialization-in-the-age-of-social-media-palgrave-macmillan-2015/feed/ 0 0:32:11 Peter J. GloviczkiView on AmazonHumans have coped with tragedy using ritual and memorials since the Neolithic era. Doka called a memorial a space invested with meaning, "set aside to commemorate an event such as a tragedy." Memorialization is a rit[...] Peter J. GloviczkiView on AmazonHumans have coped with tragedy using ritual and memorials since the Neolithic era. Doka called a memorial a space invested with meaning, "set aside to commemorate an event such as a tragedy." Memorialization is a ritual of bereavement, the creation of a place, permanent or not, that facilitates the persistence of memory. This space allows for the restructuring of the social network between the living, those who create the memorial, and the dead, those for which the memorial is created. Memorialization happens in both the analog and digital contexts. In fact, some now decline to recognize a distinction between the on- and offline worlds. In his new book, Journalism and Memorialization in the Age of Social Media (Palgrave MacMillan, 2015), Peter J. Gloviczki, an assistant professor at Coker College, conceptualizes online memorials as networked remembrance spaces. These social media posts and groups are "immediate, interactive and public and they function across a great distance." Online memorials are both user-driven – the users drive the conversations and are responsible for keeping up the sites – and story-driven – the sites are places where users tell stories related to the subject(s) of the memorial. Thorough, fact-based journalism plays an important role in the maintenance of online memorials. According to Gloviczki, news reports provide the foundation for the discussion of events, as well as being central to making sense of those events. So significant is journalism for online memorials that, in some cases, a memorial will cease once coverage of that event ends. But many online memorials continue long after media interests concludes. The persistence of these sites demonstrates how online memorials "disrupt the notion of a finite end." New Books Network no no
Natasha Myers, "Rendering Life Molecular: Models, Modelers, and Excitable Matter" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/21/natasha-myers-rendering-life-molecular-models-modelers-and-excitable-matter-duke-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/21/natasha-myers-rendering-life-molecular-models-modelers-and-excitable-matter-duke-up-2015/#comments Mon, 21 Dec 2015 15:22:17 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/21/natasha-myers-rendering-life-molecular-models-modelers-and-excitable-matter-duke-up-2015/

Natasha Myers

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After reading Natasha Myers's new book, the world begins to dance in new ways. Rendering Life Molecular: Models, Modelers, and Excitable Matter (Duke University Press, 2015) is a sensory ethnography of protein crystallographers that is based on five years of fieldwork conducted between 2003-2008 at a research university on the East Coast of the US. "Protein modelers are the scientists to watch in order to see what forms of life and what materialities are coming to matter in the twenty-first-century life sciences," according to Myers, and the book bears out this statement. Those forms of life and materialities emerge from kinesthetic and affective entanglements created and navigated by the scientists in the course of their modeling work. Understanding that work – in part thanks to a thoughtful exploration of the notion of "rendering" that unfolds over the course of the book – helps us understand the ways that scientific knowledge is fundamentally embodied and gestural, and refigures scientific cultures as performance cultures. This is an exciting, inspiring book that is simultaneously a careful study of a particular local scientific culture, and a model for how to re-enchant our knowledge of the living world.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/21/natasha-myers-rendering-life-molecular-models-modelers-and-excitable-matter-duke-up-2015/feed/ 0 1:04:54 Natasha MyersView on AmazonAfter reading Natasha Myers's new book, the world begins to dance in new ways. Rendering Life Molecular: Models, Modelers, and Excitable Matter (Duke University Press, 2015) is a sensory ethnography of protein crystallog[...] Natasha MyersView on AmazonAfter reading Natasha Myers's new book, the world begins to dance in new ways. Rendering Life Molecular: Models, Modelers, and Excitable Matter (Duke University Press, 2015) is a sensory ethnography of protein crystallographers that is based on five years of fieldwork conducted between 2003-2008 at a research university on the East Coast of the US. "Protein modelers are the scientists to watch in order to see what forms of life and what materialities are coming to matter in the twenty-first-century life sciences," according to Myers, and the book bears out this statement. Those forms of life and materialities emerge from kinesthetic and affective entanglements created and navigated by the scientists in the course of their modeling work. Understanding that work – in part thanks to a thoughtful exploration of the notion of "rendering" that unfolds over the course of the book – helps us understand the ways that scientific knowledge is fundamentally embodied and gestural, and refigures scientific cultures as performance cultures. This is an exciting, inspiring book that is simultaneously a careful study of a particular local scientific culture, and a model for how to re-enchant our knowledge of the living world. New Books Network no no
Michael Kimmel, "Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/18/michael-kimmel-angry-white-men-american-masculinity-at-the-end-of-an-era-nation-books-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/18/michael-kimmel-angry-white-men-american-masculinity-at-the-end-of-an-era-nation-books-2013/#comments Fri, 18 Dec 2015 06:00:04 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/18/michael-kimmel-angry-white-men-american-masculinity-at-the-end-of-an-era-nation-books-2013/

Michael Kimmel

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Michael Kimmel is the Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Stony Brook University. He is also executive director of the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities. His book Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era (Nation Books, 2013) is an engaging and eye-opening book about the lives and attitudes of white men who are expressing rage and feelings of "aggrieved entitlement" in a new age of gender relations. In the vast social, economy and political changes women have gained increased equality in the home, and the workplace, while many straight white males are experiencing a sense of loss. Having worked hard and fulfilled what they view as the requirements of masculinity, men now find that the economic rewards are slow in coming. Kimmel has spent hundreds of hours talking with men from different economic and social stations who blame women, blacks, and gays for their troubles. With a sympathetic ear, he examines the social construction of men's anger express in politicized anti-immigrant, anti-gay, and racist sentiment flamed by right-wing media. Feeling that the system is now stacked against them, we are seeing outbreaks of mass murder by young men at schools and workplaces and men's rights activism which seeks to restore male privilege and "stolen" fathers' rights to extreme cases of battering and murder of women. Through the political mobilization of the Extreme Right represented in the Tea Party, Neo-Nazi groups and religious fundamentalism, men are expressing despair over their perceived loss of status. White supremacist groups are drawing a growing number of women who are embracing old models of gender relations and the slogan of "taking our country back." The beginning of the end of patriarchy, Kimmel argues, is also the start of a better life for men. Gender and racial equality are good for white men and their children. What is needed is not only to turn down the volume of white male rage, but also to empower men to embrace a new definition of manhood that frees them from a sense of entitlement and opens up for them an equalitarian future.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/18/michael-kimmel-angry-white-men-american-masculinity-at-the-end-of-an-era-nation-books-2013/feed/ 0 0:44:52 Michael KimmelView on AmazonMichael Kimmel is the Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Stony Brook University. He is also executive director of the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities. His book Angry White Men: Americ[...] Michael KimmelView on AmazonMichael Kimmel is the Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at Stony Brook University. He is also executive director of the Center for the Study of Men and Masculinities. His book Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era (Nation Books, 2013) is an engaging and eye-opening book about the lives and attitudes of white men who are expressing rage and feelings of "aggrieved entitlement" in a new age of gender relations. In the vast social, economy and political changes women have gained increased equality in the home, and the workplace, while many straight white males are experiencing a sense of loss. Having worked hard and fulfilled what they view as the requirements of masculinity, men now find that the economic rewards are slow in coming. Kimmel has spent hundreds of hours talking with men from different economic and social stations who blame women, blacks, and gays for their troubles. With a sympathetic ear, he examines the social construction of men's anger express in politicized anti-immigrant, anti-gay, and racist sentiment flamed by right-wing media. Feeling that the system is now stacked against them, we are seeing outbreaks of mass murder by young men at schools and workplaces and men's rights activism which seeks to restore male privilege and "stolen" fathers' rights to extreme cases of battering and murder of women. Through the political mobilization of the Extreme Right represented in the Tea Party, Neo-Nazi groups and religious fundamentalism, men are expressing despair over their perceived loss of status. White supremacist groups are drawing a growing number of women who are embracing old models of gender relations and the slogan of "taking our country back." The beginning of the end of patriarchy, Kimmel argues, is also the start of a better life for men. Gender and racial equality are good for white men and their children. What is needed is not only to turn down the volume of white male rage, but also to empower men to embrace a new definition of manhood that frees them from a sense of entitlement and opens up for them an equalitarian future. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Francesca Bray, Peter Coclanis, Edda Fields-Black, and Dagmar Schafer, "Rice: Global Networks and New Histories" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/14/francesca-bray-et-al-eds-rice-global-networks-and-new-histories-cambridge-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/14/francesca-bray-et-al-eds-rice-global-networks-and-new-histories-cambridge-up-2015/#comments Mon, 14 Dec 2015 12:07:19 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/14/francesca-bray-et-al-eds-rice-global-networks-and-new-histories-cambridge-up-2015/

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The new edited volume by Francesca Bray, Peter Coclanis, Edda Fields-Black and Dagmar Schafer is a wonderfully interdisciplinary global history of rice, rooted in specific local cases, that spans 15 chapters written by specialists in the histories of Africa, the Americas, and several regions of Asia. Rice: Global Networks and New Histories (Cambridge University Press, 2015) creates a conversation among regional and disciplinary modes of studying and narrating rice histories that have often been conducted in isolation. Specifically, the project brings together two large-scale debates that emerge from very different rice historiographies: the "Black Rice" and "agricultural involution" debates frame the inquiry here, and as you listen to my conversation with Francesca and Dagmar (the two co-editors with whom I spoke for the podcast) you'll hear them offer an overview of the nature and stakes of both of those areas of inquiry. In the course of the conversation we also had a chance to talk about the collaborative process that produced the volume, a process that successfully maintained the specificity of the local case studies while still enabling authors to contribute to and participate in a common, global conversation that made new kinds of comparisons possible. Enjoy!

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/14/francesca-bray-et-al-eds-rice-global-networks-and-new-histories-cambridge-up-2015/feed/ 0 1:09:32 View on AmazonThe new edited volume by Francesca Bray, Peter Coclanis, Edda Fields-Black and Dagmar Schafer is a wonderfully interdisciplinary global history of rice, rooted in specific local cases, that spans 15 chapters written by specialists in[...] View on AmazonThe new edited volume by Francesca Bray, Peter Coclanis, Edda Fields-Black and Dagmar Schafer is a wonderfully interdisciplinary global history of rice, rooted in specific local cases, that spans 15 chapters written by specialists in the histories of Africa, the Americas, and several regions of Asia. Rice: Global Networks and New Histories (Cambridge University Press, 2015) creates a conversation among regional and disciplinary modes of studying and narrating rice histories that have often been conducted in isolation. Specifically, the project brings together two large-scale debates that emerge from very different rice historiographies: the "Black Rice" and "agricultural involution" debates frame the inquiry here, and as you listen to my conversation with Francesca and Dagmar (the two co-editors with whom I spoke for the podcast) you'll hear them offer an overview of the nature and stakes of both of those areas of inquiry. In the course of the conversation we also had a chance to talk about the collaborative process that produced the volume, a process that successfully maintained the specificity of the local case studies while still enabling authors to contribute to and participate in a common, global conversation that made new kinds of comparisons possible. Enjoy! Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Christine Hong, "Identity, Youth, and Gender in the Korean American Church" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/12/christine-hong-identity-youth-and-gender-in-the-korean-american-church-palgrave-macmillan-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/12/christine-hong-identity-youth-and-gender-in-the-korean-american-church-palgrave-macmillan-2015/#comments Sat, 12 Dec 2015 13:57:47 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/12/christine-hong-identity-youth-and-gender-in-the-korean-american-church-palgrave-macmillan-2015/

Christine Hong

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In her new book, Identity, Youth, and Gender in the Korean American Church (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), Dr. Christine Hong explores the lives of female Korean American Mainline Christian adolescents. Hong's work, an exercise in feminist ethnography and practical theology, focuses on the difficulties these young women encounter as people who face marginalization within both broader American society and their own faith communities, and discusses ways to help them overcome these obstacles. Hong's sensitive analysis is sure to benefit anyone interested in religion, ethnicity, and youth in America.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/12/christine-hong-identity-youth-and-gender-in-the-korean-american-church-palgrave-macmillan-2015/feed/ 0 0:47:51 Christine HongView on AmazonIn her new book, Identity, Youth, and Gender in the Korean American Church (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), Dr. Christine Hong explores the lives of female Korean American Mainline Christian adolescents. Hong's work, an exerc[...] Christine HongView on AmazonIn her new book, Identity, Youth, and Gender in the Korean American Church (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015), Dr. Christine Hong explores the lives of female Korean American Mainline Christian adolescents. Hong's work, an exercise in feminist ethnography and practical theology, focuses on the difficulties these young women encounter as people who face marginalization within both broader American society and their own faith communities, and discusses ways to help them overcome these obstacles. Hong's sensitive analysis is sure to benefit anyone interested in religion, ethnicity, and youth in America. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Arlene Davila, "Latinos, Inc.: The Marketing and Making of a People" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/11/arlene-davila-latinos-inc-the-marketing-and-making-of-a-people-u-california-press-2012/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/11/arlene-davila-latinos-inc-the-marketing-and-making-of-a-people-u-california-press-2012/#comments Fri, 11 Dec 2015 11:40:06 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/11/arlene-davila-latinos-inc-the-marketing-and-making-of-a-people-u-california-press-2012/

Arlene Davila

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In Latinos Inc.: The Marketing and Making of a People (University of California Press, updated ed. 2012) Arlene Davila, Professor of Anthropology at New York University, questions the profound influence of the Hispanic-Latina/o marketing industry in defining notions of Latina/o identity and culture. Providing an ethnography of the industry's founders, key intellectuals, as well as its position within corporate America, Dr. Dávila critiques the "sanitization" of Latinidad by Hispanic ad agencies that promote a "safe" (i.e., consumable) image of Latina/os rooted in behavioral stereotypes as Spanish-language dominant, Catholic, conservative, traditional, family-oriented, and "suicidally brand loyal." Professor Dávila also illuminates the hierarchies of race, class, culture, and nation that not only undergird the "whitewashed" representations of Latina/os, but which also work to marginalize their labor and lack of representation within the industry. Situating the rise of Hispanic marketing within its proper neoliberal context, Dávila contests the boosterish assumptions that the heightened visibility of Latina/os in the media will translate into increased political representation and power.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/11/arlene-davila-latinos-inc-the-marketing-and-making-of-a-people-u-california-press-2012/feed/ 0 0:59:12 Arlene DavilaView on AmazonIn Latinos Inc.: The Marketing and Making of a People (University of California Press, updated ed. 2012) Arlene Davila, Professor of Anthropology at New York University, questions the profound influence of the Hispanic-Lat[...] Arlene DavilaView on AmazonIn Latinos Inc.: The Marketing and Making of a People (University of California Press, updated ed. 2012) Arlene Davila, Professor of Anthropology at New York University, questions the profound influence of the Hispanic-Latina/o marketing industry in defining notions of Latina/o identity and culture. Providing an ethnography of the industry's founders, key intellectuals, as well as its position within corporate America, Dr. Dávila critiques the "sanitization" of Latinidad by Hispanic ad agencies that promote a "safe" (i.e., consumable) image of Latina/os rooted in behavioral stereotypes as Spanish-language dominant, Catholic, conservative, traditional, family-oriented, and "suicidally brand loyal." Professor Dávila also illuminates the hierarchies of race, class, culture, and nation that not only undergird the "whitewashed" representations of Latina/os, but which also work to marginalize their labor and lack of representation within the industry. Situating the rise of Hispanic marketing within its proper neoliberal context, Dávila contests the boosterish assumptions that the heightened visibility of Latina/os in the media will translate into increased political representation and power. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Erica Weiss, "Conscientious Objectors in Israel: Citizenship, Sacrifice, Trials of Fealty" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/10/erica-weiss-conscientious-objectors-in-israel-citizenship-sacrifice-trials-of-fealty-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/10/erica-weiss-conscientious-objectors-in-israel-citizenship-sacrifice-trials-of-fealty-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2014/#comments Thu, 10 Dec 2015 15:22:50 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/10/erica-weiss-conscientious-objectors-in-israel-citizenship-sacrifice-trials-of-fealty-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2014/

Erica Weiss

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In Conscientious Objectors in Israel: Citizenship, Sacrifice, Trials of Fealty (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014), Erica Weiss, assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Tel Aviv University, examines the lives and choices Israeli conscientious objectors, those who have refused to perform military service for reasons of conscience.  As an ethnographer, Weiss takes us into the the lives of two generations of conscientious objectors in a state that valorizes what she calls the "economy of sacrifice." The tale of the Israeli conscientious objection sheds light on the nature of contemporary citizenship more broadly.

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Yarimar Bonilla, "Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/10/yarimar-bonilla-non-sovereign-futures-french-caribbean-politics-in-the-wake-of-disenchantment-u-of-chicago-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/10/yarimar-bonilla-non-sovereign-futures-french-caribbean-politics-in-the-wake-of-disenchantment-u-of-chicago-press-2015/#comments Thu, 10 Dec 2015 15:03:40 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/10/yarimar-bonilla-non-sovereign-futures-french-caribbean-politics-in-the-wake-of-disenchantment-u-of-chicago-press-2015/

Yarimar Bonilla

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As overseas departments of France, the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique are frequently described as anomalies within the postcolonial Caribbean. Yet in reality, as Yarimar Bonilla argues in her new book Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment (University of Chicago Press, 2015), the majority of Caribbean states are in fact non-sovereign. Moreover, even for those nations that are nominally independent, their sovereignty is nonetheless continually compromised by the foreign influence that comes with globalization. Thus, the Caribbean as a whole is a region where non-sovereignty is the dominant political status, requiring alternative political frameworks that move beyond identifying sovereignty as the inevitable and necessary result of decolonization. Bonilla calls this process of imagining and testing out these new frameworks "non-sovereign politics." Non-Sovereign Futures examines the emergence of non-sovereign politics through an ethnography of labor activists in Guadeloupe. Whereas union activists had explicitly nationalist agendas in the 1950s and 1960s, by the early 2000s, sovereignty was no longer the terrain on which activists made claims upon the state. Bonilla provides a compelling analysis of the ways that Guadeloupean labor activists disrupted island life through a series of labor and general strikes, engaged and shaped the historical legacies of slavery and emancipation, and transformed their own personal political selves. Though these activists frequently expressed disappointment with the results of these strikes, Bonilla insists that their true accomplishment was in imagining new possibilities for making claims upon the French state that were no longer bound to the unsatisfying question of sovereignty.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/10/yarimar-bonilla-non-sovereign-futures-french-caribbean-politics-in-the-wake-of-disenchantment-u-of-chicago-press-2015/feed/ 0 0:45:27 Yarimar BonillaView on AmazonAs overseas departments of France, the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique are frequently described as anomalies within the postcolonial Caribbean. Yet in reality, as Yarimar Bonilla argues in her new book Non-Sovereign[...] Yarimar BonillaView on AmazonAs overseas departments of France, the islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique are frequently described as anomalies within the postcolonial Caribbean. Yet in reality, as Yarimar Bonilla argues in her new book Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment (University of Chicago Press, 2015), the majority of Caribbean states are in fact non-sovereign. Moreover, even for those nations that are nominally independent, their sovereignty is nonetheless continually compromised by the foreign influence that comes with globalization. Thus, the Caribbean as a whole is a region where non-sovereignty is the dominant political status, requiring alternative political frameworks that move beyond identifying sovereignty as the inevitable and necessary result of decolonization. Bonilla calls this process of imagining and testing out these new frameworks "non-sovereign politics." Non-Sovereign Futures examines the emergence of non-sovereign politics through an ethnography of labor activists in Guadeloupe. Whereas union activists had explicitly nationalist agendas in the 1950s and 1960s, by the early 2000s, sovereignty was no longer the terrain on which activists made claims upon the state. Bonilla provides a compelling analysis of the ways that Guadeloupean labor activists disrupted island life through a series of labor and general strikes, engaged and shaped the historical legacies of slavery and emancipation, and transformed their own personal political selves. Though these activists frequently expressed disappointment with the results of these strikes, Bonilla insists that their true accomplishment was in imagining new possibilities for making claims upon the French state that were no longer bound to the unsatisfying question of sovereignty. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Saba Mahmood, "Religious Difference in a Secular Age: A Minority Report" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/07/saba-mahmood-religious-difference-in-a-secular-age-a-minority-report/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/07/saba-mahmood-religious-difference-in-a-secular-age-a-minority-report/#comments Mon, 07 Dec 2015 12:04:10 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/07/saba-mahmood-religious-difference-in-a-secular-age-a-minority-report/

Saba Mahmood

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It is commonly thought that violence, injustice, and discrimination against religious minorities, especially in the Middle East, are a product of religious fundamentalism and myopia. Concomitantly, it is often argued, that more of secularism and less of religion represents the solution to this problem. In her stunning new book Religious Difference in a Secular Age: A Minority Report (Princeton University Press, 2015), Saba Mahmood, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley, brings such a celebratory view of secularism into fatal doubt. Through a careful and brilliant analysis, Mahmood convincingly shows that far from a solution to the problem of interreligious strife, political secularism and modern secular governance are in fact intimately entwined to the exacerbation of religious tensions in the Middle East. Focusing on Egypt and the experience of Egyptian Copts and Bahais, Mahmood explores multiple conceptual and discursive registers to highlight the paradoxical qualities of political secularism, arguing that majority/minority conflict in Egypt is less a reflection of the failure of secularism and more a product of secular discourses and politics, both within and outside the country. In our conversation, we touched on the salient features of this book such as the concept of political secularism and its applicability to a context such as Egypt, the genealogy of minority rights and religious liberty in the Middle East, discourses of minority rights and citizenship in relation to the Egyptian Copts, the discourse of public order and the regulation of Bahai religious identity and difference in Egypt, secularism, family law, and sexuality and the category of secularity and particular understandings of time, history, and scripture brought into view by the controversy generated in Egypt by the novel Azazeel. This theoretically rigorous book is also wonderfully written, making it particularly suitable for graduate and undergraduate courses on Islam, the Middle East, secularism, religion and politics, gender and sexuality, and theories and methods in religion.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/07/saba-mahmood-religious-difference-in-a-secular-age-a-minority-report/feed/ 0 1:23:58 Saba MahmoodView on AmazonIt is commonly thought that violence, injustice, and discrimination against religious minorities, especially in the Middle East, are a product of religious fundamentalism and myopia. Concomitantly, it is often argued, that [...] Saba MahmoodView on AmazonIt is commonly thought that violence, injustice, and discrimination against religious minorities, especially in the Middle East, are a product of religious fundamentalism and myopia. Concomitantly, it is often argued, that more of secularism and less of religion represents the solution to this problem. In her stunning new book Religious Difference in a Secular Age: A Minority Report (Princeton University Press, 2015), Saba Mahmood, Professor of Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley, brings such a celebratory view of secularism into fatal doubt. Through a careful and brilliant analysis, Mahmood convincingly shows that far from a solution to the problem of interreligious strife, political secularism and modern secular governance are in fact intimately entwined to the exacerbation of religious tensions in the Middle East. Focusing on Egypt and the experience of Egyptian Copts and Bahais, Mahmood explores multiple conceptual and discursive registers to highlight the paradoxical qualities of political secularism, arguing that majority/minority conflict in Egypt is less a reflection of the failure of secularism and more a product of secular discourses and politics, both within and outside the country. In our conversation, we touched on the salient features of this book such as the concept of political secularism and its applicability to a context such as Egypt, the genealogy of minority rights and religious liberty in the Middle East, discourses of minority rights and citizenship in relation to the Egyptian Copts, the discourse of public order and the regulation of Bahai religious identity and difference in Egypt, secularism, family law, and sexuality and the category of secularity and particular understandings of time, history, and scripture brought into view by the controversy generated in Egypt by the novel Azazeel. This theoretically rigorous book is also wonderfully written, making it particularly suitable for graduate and undergraduate courses on Islam, the Middle East, secularism, religion and politics, gender and sexuality, and theories and methods in religion. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Anna L. Tsing, "The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/06/anna-l-tsing-the-mushroom-at-the-end-of-the-world-on-the-possibility-of-life-in-capitalist-ruins-princeton-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/06/anna-l-tsing-the-mushroom-at-the-end-of-the-world-on-the-possibility-of-life-in-capitalist-ruins-princeton-up-2015/#comments Sun, 06 Dec 2015 12:16:55 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/06/anna-l-tsing-the-mushroom-at-the-end-of-the-world-on-the-possibility-of-life-in-capitalist-ruins-princeton-up-2015/

Anna L. Tsing

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Anna L. Tsing's new book is on my new (as of this post) list of Must-Read-Books-That-All-Humans-Who-Can-Read-Should-Read-And-That-Nonhumans-Should-Find-A-Way-To-Somehow-Engage-Even-If-Reading-Is-Not-Their-Thing. The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins (Princeton University Press, 2015) joyfully bursts forth in a "riot of short chapters" that collectively open out into a mushroom-focused exploration of what Tsing refers to as a "third nature," or "what manages to live despite capitalism." Tsing's book is based on fieldwork conducted between 2004 and 2011 in the US, Japan, Canada, China, and Finland, plus interviews with scientists, foresters, and matsutake traders in those places and in Denmark, Sweden, and Turkey. The book is an exemplar of the kind of work that can come out of thoughtful and extended scholarly collaboration, here resulting from Tsing's work with the Matsutake Worlds Research Group. The book treats matsutake mushrooms as objects and companions that are good to think with, offering an exuberant picture of what it might look like to live "in our messes" as parts of contaminated and contaminating multispecies worlds and assemblages. Tsing calls for renewed attention to the importance of "arts of noticing," of curiosity, of play, of polyphony, of adventure. And at the same time as it accomplishes all of this, The Mushroom at the End of the World is deeply committed to telling stories, taking us into moments in the lives of individual smellers and sellers and pickers and tasters and bosses and crusaders. It is a wonderful work of ethnography that, in many ways, transcends genre and discipline.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/06/anna-l-tsing-the-mushroom-at-the-end-of-the-world-on-the-possibility-of-life-in-capitalist-ruins-princeton-up-2015/feed/ 0 1:01:18 Anna L. TsingView on AmazonAnna L. Tsing's new book is on my new (as of this post) list of Must-Read-Books-That-All-Humans-Who-Can-Read-Should-Read-And-That-Nonhumans-Should-Find-A-Way-To-Somehow-Engage-Even-If-Reading-Is-Not-Their-Thing. The Mushr[...] Anna L. TsingView on AmazonAnna L. Tsing's new book is on my new (as of this post) list of Must-Read-Books-That-All-Humans-Who-Can-Read-Should-Read-And-That-Nonhumans-Should-Find-A-Way-To-Somehow-Engage-Even-If-Reading-Is-Not-Their-Thing. The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins (Princeton University Press, 2015) joyfully bursts forth in a "riot of short chapters" that collectively open out into a mushroom-focused exploration of what Tsing refers to as a "third nature," or "what manages to live despite capitalism." Tsing's book is based on fieldwork conducted between 2004 and 2011 in the US, Japan, Canada, China, and Finland, plus interviews with scientists, foresters, and matsutake traders in those places and in Denmark, Sweden, and Turkey. The book is an exemplar of the kind of work that can come out of thoughtful and extended scholarly collaboration, here resulting from Tsing's work with the Matsutake Worlds Research Group. The book treats matsutake mushrooms as objects and companions that are good to think with, offering an exuberant picture of what it might look like to live "in our messes" as parts of contaminated and contaminating multispecies worlds and assemblages. Tsing calls for renewed attention to the importance of "arts of noticing," of curiosity, of play, of polyphony, of adventure. And at the same time as it accomplishes all of this, The Mushroom at the End of the World is deeply committed to telling stories, taking us into moments in the lives of individual smellers and sellers and pickers and tasters and bosses and crusaders. It is a wonderful work of ethnography that, in many ways, transcends genre and discipline. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Angelique V. Nixon, "Resisting Paradise: Tourism, Diaspora, and Sexuality in Caribbean Culture" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/02/angelique-v-nixon-resisting-paradise-tourism-diaspora-and-sexuality-in-caribbean-culture-u-press-of-mississippi-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/02/angelique-v-nixon-resisting-paradise-tourism-diaspora-and-sexuality-in-caribbean-culture-u-press-of-mississippi-2015/#comments Wed, 02 Dec 2015 13:04:55 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/12/02/angelique-v-nixon-resisting-paradise-tourism-diaspora-and-sexuality-in-caribbean-culture-u-press-of-mississippi-2015/

Angelique V. Nixon

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It's easy to conjure images of paradise when thinking of the Caribbean. The region is know for its lovely beaches, temperate weather, and gorgeous landscapes. For the people who live there, however, living in paradise means dealing with tourists, inequality, exploitation, and corruption. While many scholars have published critiques of Caribbean tourism ranging from measured to withering, the voices of Caribbean people, living in the region or abroad, are rarely evident. Angelique V. Nixon's Resisting Paradise: Tourism, Diaspora, and Sexuality in Caribbean Culture (U Press of Mississippi, 2015 ) explores the many ways in which Caribbean authors, artists, workers, filmakers, educators and activists have understood, worked with, and challenged the foundations of a tourist economy.

For more information about the author's work, follow her on Facebook (Angelique V. Nixon), Twitter and Instagram @sistellablack, blog,  and visit her staff page on the IGDS website.

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Marcia C. Inhorn, "The New Arab Man: Emergent Masculinities, Technologies, and Islam in the Middle East" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/25/marcia-c-inhorn-the-new-arab-man-emergent-masculinities-technologies-and-islam-in-the-middle-east-princeton-up-2012/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/25/marcia-c-inhorn-the-new-arab-man-emergent-masculinities-technologies-and-islam-in-the-middle-east-princeton-up-2012/#comments Wed, 25 Nov 2015 06:00:26 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/25/marcia-c-inhorn-the-new-arab-man-emergent-masculinities-technologies-and-islam-in-the-middle-east-princeton-up-2012/

Marcia C. Inhorn

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Winner of the 2015 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology, and the American Anthropological Association Winner of the 2014 JMEWS Book Award, The New Arab Man: Emergent Masculinities, Technologies, and Islam in the Middle East (Princeton University Press, 2015) by Marcia C. Inhorn challenges the Western stereotypical image of the Arab man as terrorist, religious zealot, and brutal oppressor of women. Through stories of ordinary Middle Eastern men as they struggle to overcome infertility and childlessness through assisted reproduction, Inhorn draws on two decades of ethnographic research across the Middle East with hundreds of men from a variety of social and religious backgrounds to show how the new Arab man is self-consciously rethinking the patriarchal masculinity of his forefathers and unseating received wisdoms. This is especially true in childless Middle Eastern marriages where, contrary to popular belief, infertility is more common among men than women. Inhorn captures the marital, moral, and material commitments of couples undergoing assisted reproduction, revealing how new technologies are transforming their lives and religious sensibilities.

 

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/25/marcia-c-inhorn-the-new-arab-man-emergent-masculinities-technologies-and-islam-in-the-middle-east-princeton-up-2012/feed/ 0 0:55:19 Marcia C. InhornView on AmazonWinner of the 2015 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology, and the American Anthropological Association Winner of the 2014 JMEWS Book Award, The New Arab Man: Emergent Masculiniti[...] Marcia C. InhornView on AmazonWinner of the 2015 Robert B. Textor and Family Prize for Excellence in Anticipatory Anthropology, and the American Anthropological Association Winner of the 2014 JMEWS Book Award, The New Arab Man: Emergent Masculinities, Technologies, and Islam in the Middle East (Princeton University Press, 2015) by Marcia C. Inhorn challenges the Western stereotypical image of the Arab man as terrorist, religious zealot, and brutal oppressor of women. Through stories of ordinary Middle Eastern men as they struggle to overcome infertility and childlessness through assisted reproduction, Inhorn draws on two decades of ethnographic research across the Middle East with hundreds of men from a variety of social and religious backgrounds to show how the new Arab man is self-consciously rethinking the patriarchal masculinity of his forefathers and unseating received wisdoms. This is especially true in childless Middle Eastern marriages where, contrary to popular belief, infertility is more common among men than women. Inhorn captures the marital, moral, and material commitments of couples undergoing assisted reproduction, revealing how new technologies are transforming their lives and religious sensibilities.   Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Phillip Roscoe, "A Richer Life: How Economics can Change the Way We Think and Feel" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/19/philip-roscoe-a-richer-life-how-economics-can-change-the-way-we-think-and-feel-penguin-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/19/philip-roscoe-a-richer-life-how-economics-can-change-the-way-we-think-and-feel-penguin-2015/#comments Thu, 19 Nov 2015 14:44:23 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/19/philip-roscoe-a-richer-life-how-economics-can-change-the-way-we-think-and-feel-penguin-2015/

Phillip Roscoe

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So many of our social questions are now the subject of analysis from economics. In A Richer Life: How Economics can Change the Way We Think and Feel (Penguin, 2015), Phillip Roscoe, a reader at the University of St Andrew's School of Management, offers a critique of the long march of economics into social life. The book covers a vast range of social examples, including dating, organ transplantation, and education, alongside accessible engagements with historical and contemporary economic theory. Using personal examples as well as academic expertise, Roscoe's book offers a primer in the social cost of economics, as well as what we can do to resit and challenge economistic modes of thought.

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John Durham Peters, "The Marvelous Clouds: Toward a Philosophy of Elemental Media" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/17/john-durham-peters-the-marvelous-clouds-toward-a-philosophy-of-elemental-media-u-of-chicago-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/17/john-durham-peters-the-marvelous-clouds-toward-a-philosophy-of-elemental-media-u-of-chicago-press-2015/#comments Tue, 17 Nov 2015 13:05:57 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/17/john-durham-peters-the-marvelous-clouds-toward-a-philosophy-of-elemental-media-u-of-chicago-press-2015/

John Durham Peters

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[Cross-posted from the NBN SeminarJohn Durham Peters' wonderful new book is a brilliant and beautifully-written consideration of natural environments as subjects for media studies. Accessible and informative for a broad readership. The Marvelous Clouds: Toward a Philosophy of Elemental Media (University of Chicago Press, 2015) is structured as a series of meditations on and explorations of water, fire, air, earth, and ether media. After a chapter that sets out some of the foundational ideas shaping the book and charts an intellectual landscape for rethinking media, each of the following chapters offers a carefully curated series of studies of particulars – dolphin jaws, candles, towers, watches, clouds, feet, bells, weathermen, Google, and more – as a means of examining the significance of infrastructure, forgetting, technicity, and other modes of understanding media. Peters asks us to come with a fresh perspective to notions that we otherwise take for granted, and the result is a thoughtful and inspiring account that brings together media studies, theology, philosophy, and the natural sciences in thoroughly compelling ways. Among other things, the book is a call for a "greener media studies" that "appreciates our long natural history of shaping and being shaped by our habitats as a process of mediation." What if, Peters asks, we took nature instead of the mind as the "epitome of meaning"? What are the stakes of doing so? The result is among the most exciting and enjoyable books that I've read in some time.

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Anderson Blanton, "Hittin' the Prayer Bones: Materiality of Spirit in the Pentecostal South" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/12/anderson-blanton-hittin-the-prayer-bones-materiality-of-spirit-in-the-pentecostal-south-unc-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/12/anderson-blanton-hittin-the-prayer-bones-materiality-of-spirit-in-the-pentecostal-south-unc-press-2015/#comments Thu, 12 Nov 2015 17:44:14 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/11/12/anderson-blanton-hittin-the-prayer-bones-materiality-of-spirit-in-the-pentecostal-south-unc-press-2015/

Anderson Blanton

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Anderson Blanton's Hittin' the Prayer Bones: Materiality of Spirit in the Pentecostal South (University of North Carolina Press, 2015), illuminates how prayer, faith, and healing are intertwined with technologies of sound reproduction and material culture in the charismatic Christian worship of southern Appalachia. Drawing on two years of field work in church congregations and small independent radio studios, Hittin the Prayer Bones explores radio prayers, curative faith cloths, and the poetics of breath and laughter in broadcast sermons. It is an attempt to hear and feel the Holy Ghost in sonic and material space, bodily techniques, and media technology. Throughout, it documents the transformation and consecration of everyday objects, while also offering a historiography of faith healing and prayer, as well as insight into theoretical models of materiality and transcendence.

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Eugene Raikhel, Editor; Todd Meyers, Associate Editor; Emily Yates-Doerr, Member, "Somatosphere.net" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/13/eugene-raikhel-todd-meyers-emily-yates-doerr-somatosphere-net/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/13/eugene-raikhel-todd-meyers-emily-yates-doerr-somatosphere-net/#comments Tue, 13 Oct 2015 13:56:24 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/13/eugene-raikhel-todd-meyers-emily-yates-doerr-somatosphere-net/

017medicinesomatosphere_bkcoverSomatosphere is "a collaborative website covering the intersections of medical anthropology, science and technology studies, cultural psychiatry, psychology and bioethics." Founded in July 2008, Somatosphere has evolved into an innovative platform for collaborative experiments, interdisciplinary exchange, and intellectual community. As such, it reveals how websites–and the communities of discourse that create and read them–have become important sites of intellectual production, authorship, and exchange. In editorial departments such as "In the Journals" and "Web Roundup," authors distill recent scholarly contributions across disciplines and spaces. More recently, the editors have incubated creative digital endeavors such as Commonplaces, a "collaborative cabinet" that itemizes the technological present, with entries devoted to topics such as the petri dish, the brain, and the waiting room. Book Forum invites commentary from a range of authors, representing not only different scholarly disciplines but offering intriguing, timely, and often original angles on recent important texts. Thanks to its editorial vision and the palpable energy of its contributors, Somatosphere has become informative, creative, and essential reading.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/13/eugene-raikhel-todd-meyers-emily-yates-doerr-somatosphere-net/feed/ 0 0:58:22 Somatosphere is "a collaborative website covering the intersections of medical anthropology, science and technology studies, cultural psychiatry, psychology and bioethics." Founded in July 2008, Somatosphere has evolved into an innovative platform f[...] Somatosphere is "a collaborative website covering the intersections of medical anthropology, science and technology studies, cultural psychiatry, psychology and bioethics." Founded in July 2008, Somatosphere has evolved into an innovative platform for collaborative experiments, interdisciplinary exchange, and intellectual community. As such, it reveals how websites–and the communities of discourse that create and read them–have become important sites of intellectual production, authorship, and exchange. In editorial departments such as "In the Journals" and "Web Roundup," authors distill recent scholarly contributions across disciplines and spaces. More recently, the editors have incubated creative digital endeavors such as Commonplaces, a "collaborative cabinet" that itemizes the technological present, with entries devoted to topics such as the petri dish, the brain, and the waiting room. Book Forum invites commentary from a range of authors, representing not only different scholarly disciplines but offering intriguing, timely, and often original angles on recent important texts. Thanks to its editorial vision and the palpable energy of its contributors, Somatosphere has become informative, creative, and essential reading. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Adam Rosenblatt, "Digging for the Disappeared: Forensic Science After Atrocity" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/09/adam-rosenblatt-digging-for-the-disappeared-forensic-science-after-atrocity-stanford-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/09/adam-rosenblatt-digging-for-the-disappeared-forensic-science-after-atrocity-stanford-up-2015/#comments Fri, 09 Oct 2015 16:14:50 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/09/adam-rosenblatt-digging-for-the-disappeared-forensic-science-after-atrocity-stanford-up-2015/

Adam Rosenblatt

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Do dead bodies have human rights?

This is one of many fascinating questions Adam Rosenblatt asks in his compelling new book Digging for the Disappeared: Forensic Science After Atrocity (Stanford University Press, 2015)

Rosenblatt, a faculty member at Haverford College, doesn't try to recount the emergence of forensic science  in investigating mass violence.  Instead, he's really interested in examining the political, ethical and philosophical questions that surround the study of dead bodies in the aftermath of atrocities.  His book is a thought examination of these questions.  He considers how the interests of the various constituents of forensic investigations often clash.  He thinks about the way in which dead bodies become political footballs.  He considers how to balance the sometime competing claims of religion, lawyers and politicians to human remains.  And he asks how best to recognize the rights of the dead. Digging for the Disappeared is a rich, introspective and thoughtful treatment of an increasingly important subject.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/09/adam-rosenblatt-digging-for-the-disappeared-forensic-science-after-atrocity-stanford-up-2015/feed/ 0 1:18:54 Adam RosenblattView on AmazonDo dead bodies have human rights? This is one of many fascinating questions Adam Rosenblatt asks in his compelling new book Digging for the Disappeared: Forensic Science After Atrocity (Stanford University Press, 2015) R[...] Adam RosenblattView on AmazonDo dead bodies have human rights? This is one of many fascinating questions Adam Rosenblatt asks in his compelling new book Digging for the Disappeared: Forensic Science After Atrocity (Stanford University Press, 2015) Rosenblatt, a faculty member at Haverford College, doesn't try to recount the emergence of forensic science  in investigating mass violence.  Instead, he's really interested in examining the political, ethical and philosophical questions that surround the study of dead bodies in the aftermath of atrocities.  His book is a thought examination of these questions.  He considers how the interests of the various constituents of forensic investigations often clash.  He thinks about the way in which dead bodies become political footballs.  He considers how to balance the sometime competing claims of religion, lawyers and politicians to human remains.  And he asks how best to recognize the rights of the dead. Digging for the Disappeared is a rich, introspective and thoughtful treatment of an increasingly important subject. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Annie Blazer, "Playing for God: Evangelical Women and the Unintended Consequences of Sports Ministry" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/08/annie-blazer-playing-for-god-evangelical-women-and-the-unintended-consequences-of-sports-ministry-nyu-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/08/annie-blazer-playing-for-god-evangelical-women-and-the-unintended-consequences-of-sports-ministry-nyu-press-2015/#comments Thu, 08 Oct 2015 11:32:52 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/08/annie-blazer-playing-for-god-evangelical-women-and-the-unintended-consequences-of-sports-ministry-nyu-press-2015/

Annie Blazer

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In her new book, Playing for God: Evangelical Women and the Unintended Consequences of Sports Ministry (NYU Press, 2015), Annie Blazer shows through archival research and participant-observation how the paradigm of sports ministry transformed from one centered on celebrity male athletes using their fame to explicitly call audiences to conversion to Christ, to one in which female athletes predominate and implicitly seek to convert their sports fans through moral, Christian behavior while seeing themselves as engaged in spiritual warfare and enjoying the joy of athletic pleasure as God's affirmation of their own devotion. At the same time, Blazer shows how their identity as female athletes and relationships with players who are lesbians has led many to reinterpret or challenge traditional Evangelical understandings of gender roles and sexuality. Throughout her book, Blazer skillfully weaves together the stories her subjects told her with her own insightful analysis, all done in a sensitive and even-handed way. This book is an excellent read, and anyone interested in the intersection of sports, gender, and Evangelical Christianity would gain much from it.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/08/annie-blazer-playing-for-god-evangelical-women-and-the-unintended-consequences-of-sports-ministry-nyu-press-2015/feed/ 0 1:11:20 Annie BlazerView on AmazonIn her new book, Playing for God: Evangelical Women and the Unintended Consequences of Sports Ministry (NYU Press, 2015), Annie Blazer shows through archival research and participant-observation how the paradigm of sport[...] Annie BlazerView on AmazonIn her new book, Playing for God: Evangelical Women and the Unintended Consequences of Sports Ministry (NYU Press, 2015), Annie Blazer shows through archival research and participant-observation how the paradigm of sports ministry transformed from one centered on celebrity male athletes using their fame to explicitly call audiences to conversion to Christ, to one in which female athletes predominate and implicitly seek to convert their sports fans through moral, Christian behavior while seeing themselves as engaged in spiritual warfare and enjoying the joy of athletic pleasure as God's affirmation of their own devotion. At the same time, Blazer shows how their identity as female athletes and relationships with players who are lesbians has led many to reinterpret or challenge traditional Evangelical understandings of gender roles and sexuality. Throughout her book, Blazer skillfully weaves together the stories her subjects told her with her own insightful analysis, all done in a sensitive and even-handed way. This book is an excellent read, and anyone interested in the intersection of sports, gender, and Evangelical Christianity would gain much from it. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Eric H. Cline, "1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/07/eric-h-cline-1177-b-c-the-year-civilization-collapsed-princeton-university-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/07/eric-h-cline-1177-b-c-the-year-civilization-collapsed-princeton-university-press-2014/#comments Wed, 07 Oct 2015 10:31:52 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/07/eric-h-cline-1177-b-c-the-year-civilization-collapsed-princeton-university-press-2014/

Eric H. Cline

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It quickly sold out in hardback, and then, within a matter of days, sold out in paperback. Available again as a 2nd edition hardback, and soon in the 10th edition paperback with a new Afterword by the author, Eric H. Cline's 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed (Princeton University Press, 2015) is THE must have, must read book of 2014, and 2015. Why? Because it's serious archaeology, history and anthropology, but it reads like a mystery novel. The prose is superb; so good that it's hard to put down. Homer wrote about the Age of Olympians: Zeus and Apollo, Odysseus, Achilles and Hector. Cline writes about the Minoans and Mycenaeans, the Trojans and the Egyptians, Hittites and Babylonians. And both epics, one mythology and one history, are about the same extraordinary time.

Cline recreates the late Bronze Age in fascinating detail and then describes its utter and complete destruction. City after city, empire after empire, civilization after civilization: annihilated to extinction, one right after another, and in a shockingly short amount of time. What caused a catastrophe so extreme that the First Dark Age descended over the world: a mysterious invading culture–the Sea People, plague and pestilence, earthquake, climate change, all of the above? 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed discusses each possibility in turn. A great interview with a world-class researcher–it easily could have gone for three-hours.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/07/eric-h-cline-1177-b-c-the-year-civilization-collapsed-princeton-university-press-2014/feed/ 0 1:25:57 Eric H. ClineView on AmazonIt quickly sold out in hardback, and then, within a matter of days, sold out in paperback. Available again as a 2nd edition hardback, and soon in the 10th edition paperback with a new Afterword by the author, Eric H. Cline[...] Eric H. ClineView on AmazonIt quickly sold out in hardback, and then, within a matter of days, sold out in paperback. Available again as a 2nd edition hardback, and soon in the 10th edition paperback with a new Afterword by the author, Eric H. Cline's 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed (Princeton University Press, 2015) is THE must have, must read book of 2014, and 2015. Why? Because it's serious archaeology, history and anthropology, but it reads like a mystery novel. The prose is superb; so good that it's hard to put down. Homer wrote about the Age of Olympians: Zeus and Apollo, Odysseus, Achilles and Hector. Cline writes about the Minoans and Mycenaeans, the Trojans and the Egyptians, Hittites and Babylonians. And both epics, one mythology and one history, are about the same extraordinary time. Cline recreates the late Bronze Age in fascinating detail and then describes its utter and complete destruction. City after city, empire after empire, civilization after civilization: annihilated to extinction, one right after another, and in a shockingly short amount of time. What caused a catastrophe so extreme that the First Dark Age descended over the world: a mysterious invading culture–the Sea People, plague and pestilence, earthquake, climate change, all of the above? 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed discusses each possibility in turn. A great interview with a world-class researcher–it easily could have gone for three-hours. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Kate Pahl, "Materializing Literacies in Communities: he Uses of Literacy Revisited" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/06/kate-pahl-materializing-literacies-in-communities-the-uses-of-literacy-revisited-bloomsbury-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/06/kate-pahl-materializing-literacies-in-communities-the-uses-of-literacy-revisited-bloomsbury-2014/#comments Tue, 06 Oct 2015 13:46:53 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/06/kate-pahl-materializing-literacies-in-communities-the-uses-of-literacy-revisited-bloomsbury-2014/

Kate Pahl

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Literary practices are often associated with specific social groups in particular social settings. Kate Pahl's Materializing Literacies in Communities: The Uses of Literacy Revisited (Bloomsbury, 2014) challenges these assumptions by showing the varieties of literary practice in Rotherham, England. The book engages with the locally particular to draw out a variety of general findings, relevant to methodological reflection and material culture debates. The book draws on a wealth of projects from the AHRC funded Connected Communities programme, including Fishing as Wisdom, The Imagine Projectand Language as TalismanThe book represents an important intervention into how we understand community, literacy and identity.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/06/kate-pahl-materializing-literacies-in-communities-the-uses-of-literacy-revisited-bloomsbury-2014/feed/ 0 0:36:33 Kate PahlView on AmazonLiterary practices are often associated with specific social groups in particular social settings. Kate Pahl's Materializing Literacies in Communities: The Uses of Literacy Revisited (Bloomsbury, 2014) challenges these assum[...] Kate PahlView on AmazonLiterary practices are often associated with specific social groups in particular social settings. Kate Pahl's Materializing Literacies in Communities: The Uses of Literacy Revisited (Bloomsbury, 2014) challenges these assumptions by showing the varieties of literary practice in Rotherham, England. The book engages with the locally particular to draw out a variety of general findings, relevant to methodological reflection and material culture debates. The book draws on a wealth of projects from the AHRC funded Connected Communities programme, including Fishing as Wisdom, The Imagine Project, and Language as Talisman. The book represents an important intervention into how we understand community, literacy and identity. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Sanjay Srivastava, "Entangled Urbanism: Slum, Gated Community and Shopping Mall in Delhi and Gurgaon" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/02/sanjay-srivastava-entangled-urbanism-slum-gated-community-and-shopping-mall-in-delhi-and-gurgaon-oxford-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/02/sanjay-srivastava-entangled-urbanism-slum-gated-community-and-shopping-mall-in-delhi-and-gurgaon-oxford-up-2015/#comments Fri, 02 Oct 2015 14:48:12 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/02/sanjay-srivastava-entangled-urbanism-slum-gated-community-and-shopping-mall-in-delhi-and-gurgaon-oxford-up-2015/

Sanjay Srivastava

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Entangled Urbanism: Slum, Gated Community and Shopping Mall in Delhi and Gurgaon (Oxford University Press, 2015) is the latest book by Sanjay Srivastava. A wonderfully readable piece of urban anthropology, the book explores the ways spaces and processes are interconnected in the city. From temples that resemble shopping malls, through the gates of luxury apartments and into the electricity supply networks of slums, the book pulls together the threads that entangle city dwellers with one another.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/10/02/sanjay-srivastava-entangled-urbanism-slum-gated-community-and-shopping-mall-in-delhi-and-gurgaon-oxford-up-2015/feed/ 0 0:44:02 Sanjay SrivastavaView on AmazonEntangled Urbanism: Slum, Gated Community and Shopping Mall in Delhi and Gurgaon (Oxford University Press, 2015) is the latest book by Sanjay Srivastava. A wonderfully readable piece of urban anthropology, the book ex[...] Sanjay SrivastavaView on AmazonEntangled Urbanism: Slum, Gated Community and Shopping Mall in Delhi and Gurgaon (Oxford University Press, 2015) is the latest book by Sanjay Srivastava. A wonderfully readable piece of urban anthropology, the book explores the ways spaces and processes are interconnected in the city. From temples that resemble shopping malls, through the gates of luxury apartments and into the electricity supply networks of slums, the book pulls together the threads that entangle city dwellers with one another. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Jonathyne Briggs, "Sounds French: Globalization, Cultural Communities, and Pop Music, 1958-1980" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/30/jonathyne-briggs-sounds-french-globalization-cultural-communities-and-pop-music-1958-1980-oxford-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/30/jonathyne-briggs-sounds-french-globalization-cultural-communities-and-pop-music-1958-1980-oxford-up-2015/#comments Wed, 30 Sep 2015 14:48:37 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/30/jonathyne-briggs-sounds-french-globalization-cultural-communities-and-pop-music-1958-1980-oxford-up-2015/

Jonathyne Briggs

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"Pop pop pop pop musik" -M

Jonathyne Briggs' new book, Sounds French: Globalization, Cultural Communities, and Pop Music, 1958-1980 (Oxford University Press, 2015)  makes music the historical focus of the Fifth Republic's first two decades. What made certain sounds "French," and how did different cultural communities come together, expressing themselves in a variety of musical forms? From Françoise Hardy to Serge Gainsbourg, to the sounds of free jazz, Brittany folk, and punk, the book considers French musical production and consumption in global cultural context. Exploring the relationship between audio and national identities and communities, Briggs tracks both the influences from outside France on a range of scenes in and beyond Paris, and the reach of "French" sounds beyond the nation's borders.

Sounds French is a book that examines the contributions of artists and listeners, reading "the noise" of (and surrounding) the music treated in its pages. The book also includes links to some of the songs that Briggs writes about (see the companion website developed by OUP). Fans of yé-yé, Johnny Hallyday, chanson, Jean-Michel Jarre, Alain Stivell, Métal Urbain, and/or Daft Punk will all find much to learn and enjoy here.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/30/jonathyne-briggs-sounds-french-globalization-cultural-communities-and-pop-music-1958-1980-oxford-up-2015/feed/ 0 0:59:46 Jonathyne BriggsView on Amazon"Pop pop pop pop musik" -M Jonathyne Briggs' new book, Sounds French: Globalization, Cultural Communities, and Pop Music, 1958-1980 (Oxford University Press, 2015)  makes music the historical focus of the Fifth Republ[...] Jonathyne BriggsView on Amazon"Pop pop pop pop musik" -M Jonathyne Briggs' new book, Sounds French: Globalization, Cultural Communities, and Pop Music, 1958-1980 (Oxford University Press, 2015)  makes music the historical focus of the Fifth Republic's first two decades. What made certain sounds "French," and how did different cultural communities come together, expressing themselves in a variety of musical forms? From Françoise Hardy to Serge Gainsbourg, to the sounds of free jazz, Brittany folk, and punk, the book considers French musical production and consumption in global cultural context. Exploring the relationship between audio and national identities and communities, Briggs tracks both the influences from outside France on a range of scenes in and beyond Paris, and the reach of "French" sounds beyond the nation's borders. Sounds French is a book that examines the contributions of artists and listeners, reading "the noise" of (and surrounding) the music treated in its pages. The book also includes links to some of the songs that Briggs writes about (see the companion website developed by OUP). Fans of yé-yé, Johnny Hallyday, chanson, Jean-Michel Jarre, Alain Stivell, Métal Urbain, and/or Daft Punk will all find much to learn and enjoy here. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Amanda Lucia, "Reflections of Amma: Devotees in a Global Embrace" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/26/amanda-lucia-reflections-of-amma-devotees-in-a-global-embrace-university-of-california-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/26/amanda-lucia-reflections-of-amma-devotees-in-a-global-embrace-university-of-california-press-2014/#comments Sat, 26 Sep 2015 19:50:52 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/26/amanda-lucia-reflections-of-amma-devotees-in-a-global-embrace-university-of-california-press-2014/

Amanda Lucia

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Waiting several hours in line for a hug is well worth it for thousands of people, the devotees of the Guru,  Amma, Mata Amritanandamayi. In Reflections of Amma: Devotees in a Global Embrace (University of California Press, 2014), Amanda Lucia, Associate Professor of Religion at UC Riverside, provides a rich ethnographic account of Amma's American followers and convincingly argues that there is much to learn here about gender, interpretation, and contemporary American religiosity. Amma's devotees in the United States are usually "inheritors" or "adopters" of Hindu traditions, which shapes their interpretive vantage point and understandings of Amma as Hindu goddesses or feminist. American multiculturalism and romantic orientalist attitudes frequently reifiy cultural differences further structuring the interrelations between South Asian and non-Indian devotees in the American context. In our conversation we discuss female religious leaders, darshan, gurus in American context, purity and ritual, women's empowerment, village and urban transformations, Devi Bhava, and gendered interpretations of Hinduism.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/26/amanda-lucia-reflections-of-amma-devotees-in-a-global-embrace-university-of-california-press-2014/feed/ 0 0:55:56 Amanda LuciaView on AmazonWaiting several hours in line for a hug is well worth it for thousands of people, the devotees of the Guru,  Amma, Mata Amritanandamayi. In Reflections of Amma: Devotees in a Global Embrace (University of California Press,[...] Amanda LuciaView on AmazonWaiting several hours in line for a hug is well worth it for thousands of people, the devotees of the Guru,  Amma, Mata Amritanandamayi. In Reflections of Amma: Devotees in a Global Embrace (University of California Press, 2014), Amanda Lucia, Associate Professor of Religion at UC Riverside, provides a rich ethnographic account of Amma's American followers and convincingly argues that there is much to learn here about gender, interpretation, and contemporary American religiosity. Amma's devotees in the United States are usually "inheritors" or "adopters" of Hindu traditions, which shapes their interpretive vantage point and understandings of Amma as Hindu goddesses or feminist. American multiculturalism and romantic orientalist attitudes frequently reifiy cultural differences further structuring the interrelations between South Asian and non-Indian devotees in the American context. In our conversation we discuss female religious leaders, darshan, gurus in American context, purity and ritual, women's empowerment, village and urban transformations, Devi Bhava, and gendered interpretations of Hinduism. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Kimberly Arkin, "Rhinestones, Religion, and the Republic: Fashioning Jewishness in France" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/24/kimberly-arkin-rhinestones-religion-and-the-republic-fashioning-jewishness-in-france-stanford-up-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/24/kimberly-arkin-rhinestones-religion-and-the-republic-fashioning-jewishness-in-france-stanford-up-2013/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 17:57:25 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/24/kimberly-arkin-rhinestones-religion-and-the-republic-fashioning-jewishness-in-france-stanford-up-2013/

Kimberly Arkin

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In Rhinestones, Religion, and the Republic: Fashioning Jewishness in France (Stanford University Press, 2014), Kimberly Arkin, assistant professor of anthropology at Boston University, explores the "racialization" of Jewishness among second- and third-generation North African Jewish adolescents in France. Through her interviews with students at three Jewish day schools and other members of the Paris Jewish community, she sheds light on the issue of multiculturalism in postcolonial France.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/24/kimberly-arkin-rhinestones-religion-and-the-republic-fashioning-jewishness-in-france-stanford-up-2013/feed/ 0 0:32:06 Kimberly ArkinView on AmazonIn Rhinestones, Religion, and the Republic: Fashioning Jewishness in France (Stanford University Press, 2014), Kimberly Arkin, assistant professor of anthropology at Boston University, explores the "racialization" of Je[...] Kimberly ArkinView on AmazonIn Rhinestones, Religion, and the Republic: Fashioning Jewishness in France (Stanford University Press, 2014), Kimberly Arkin, assistant professor of anthropology at Boston University, explores the "racialization" of Jewishness among second- and third-generation North African Jewish adolescents in France. Through her interviews with students at three Jewish day schools and other members of the Paris Jewish community, she sheds light on the issue of multiculturalism in postcolonial France. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Leonard Cassuto, "The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/22/leonard-cassuto-the-graduate-school-mess-what-caused-it-and-how-we-can-fix-it-harvard-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/22/leonard-cassuto-the-graduate-school-mess-what-caused-it-and-how-we-can-fix-it-harvard-up-2015/#comments Tue, 22 Sep 2015 12:46:05 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/22/leonard-cassuto-the-graduate-school-mess-what-caused-it-and-how-we-can-fix-it-harvard-up-2015/

Leonard Cassuto

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The discontented graduate student is something of a cultural fixture in the U.S. Indeed theirs is a sorry lot. They work very hard, earn very little, and have very poor prospects. Nearly all of them want to become professors, but most of them won't. Indeed a disturbingly large minority of them won't even finish their degrees. It's little wonder graduate students are, as a group, somewhat depressed.

In his thought-provoking book The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It (Harvard University Press, 2015), Leonard Cassuto tries to figure out why graduate education in the U.S. is in such a sad state. More importantly, he offers a host of fascinating proposals to "fix" American graduate schools. Listen in.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/22/leonard-cassuto-the-graduate-school-mess-what-caused-it-and-how-we-can-fix-it-harvard-up-2015/feed/ 0 0:46:11 Leonard CassutoView on AmazonThe discontented graduate student is something of a cultural fixture in the U.S. Indeed theirs is a sorry lot. They work very hard, earn very little, and have very poor prospects. Nearly all of them want to become profe[...] Leonard CassutoView on AmazonThe discontented graduate student is something of a cultural fixture in the U.S. Indeed theirs is a sorry lot. They work very hard, earn very little, and have very poor prospects. Nearly all of them want to become professors, but most of them won't. Indeed a disturbingly large minority of them won't even finish their degrees. It's little wonder graduate students are, as a group, somewhat depressed. In his thought-provoking book The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It (Harvard University Press, 2015), Leonard Cassuto tries to figure out why graduate education in the U.S. is in such a sad state. More importantly, he offers a host of fascinating proposals to "fix" American graduate schools. Listen in. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Neha Vora, "Impossible Citizens: Dubai's Indian Diaspora" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/22/neha-vora-impossible-citizens-dubais-indian-diaspora-duke-up-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/22/neha-vora-impossible-citizens-dubais-indian-diaspora-duke-up-2013/#comments Tue, 22 Sep 2015 06:00:18 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/22/neha-vora-impossible-citizens-dubais-indian-diaspora-duke-up-2013/

Neha Vora

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Neha Vora's Impossible Citizens: Dubai's Indian Diaspora (Duke University Press, 2013) is a wonderfully rich and engaging account of middle class Indians who live and work, supposedly temporarily, in Dubai. Through an analysis of these perpetual outsiders, that are crucial to the Emirati economy, Vora sheds new light on our understanding of citizenship, belonging and Dubai itself. In the finest tradition of anthropology, the book is simultaneously minutely detailed in its descriptions and global in its analytical reach, opening up new ways of thinking about migrants in the contemporary world.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/22/neha-vora-impossible-citizens-dubais-indian-diaspora-duke-up-2013/feed/ 0 0:53:24 Neha VoraView on AmazonNeha Vora's Impossible Citizens: Dubai's Indian Diaspora (Duke University Press, 2013) is a wonderfully rich and engaging account of middle class Indians who live and work, supposedly temporarily, in Dubai. Through an analysis[...] Neha VoraView on AmazonNeha Vora's Impossible Citizens: Dubai's Indian Diaspora (Duke University Press, 2013) is a wonderfully rich and engaging account of middle class Indians who live and work, supposedly temporarily, in Dubai. Through an analysis of these perpetual outsiders, that are crucial to the Emirati economy, Vora sheds new light on our understanding of citizenship, belonging and Dubai itself. In the finest tradition of anthropology, the book is simultaneously minutely detailed in its descriptions and global in its analytical reach, opening up new ways of thinking about migrants in the contemporary world. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Gerard Russell, "Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms: Journeys Into the Disappearing Religions of the Middle East" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/21/gerard-russell-heirs-to-forgotten-kingdoms-journeys-into-the-disappearing-religions-of-the-middle-east-basic-books-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/21/gerard-russell-heirs-to-forgotten-kingdoms-journeys-into-the-disappearing-religions-of-the-middle-east-basic-books-2014/#comments Mon, 21 Sep 2015 11:32:37 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/21/gerard-russell-heirs-to-forgotten-kingdoms-journeys-into-the-disappearing-religions-of-the-middle-east-basic-books-2014/

Gerard Russell

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In this interview Gerard Russell talks about his vivid and timely new book Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms: Journeys Into the Disappearing Religions of the Middle East (Basic Books, 2014). Russell's experience as a British diplomat in a rapidly changing region gives the book remarkable breadth, providing a valuable insight into the lives of minority communities from the Afghanistan-Pakistan border to Egypt: Mandaeans, Yazidis, Zoroastrians, Druze, Samaritans, Copts and Kalasha. Russell's account pays particular attention to the circulation of stories, symbols and practices between these groups and reveals a history or extraordinary diversity and interdependence. His journey through this symbolic ecosystem, struggling to survive in its lands of origin, leads him eventually to diaspora communities in America and Europe. Is this the final domain of these forgotten kingdoms?

Gerard Russell's account of these colourful pasts, precarious presents and unknown futures will be of interest to scholars of religion, culture, the Middle East, and a wider non-specialist readership.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/21/gerard-russell-heirs-to-forgotten-kingdoms-journeys-into-the-disappearing-religions-of-the-middle-east-basic-books-2014/feed/ 0 0:45:01 Gerard RussellView on AmazonIn this interview Gerard Russell talks about his vivid and timely new book Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms: Journeys Into the Disappearing Religions of the Middle East (Basic Books, 2014). Russell's experience as a British [...] Gerard RussellView on AmazonIn this interview Gerard Russell talks about his vivid and timely new book Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms: Journeys Into the Disappearing Religions of the Middle East (Basic Books, 2014). Russell's experience as a British diplomat in a rapidly changing region gives the book remarkable breadth, providing a valuable insight into the lives of minority communities from the Afghanistan-Pakistan border to Egypt: Mandaeans, Yazidis, Zoroastrians, Druze, Samaritans, Copts and Kalasha. Russell's account pays particular attention to the circulation of stories, symbols and practices between these groups and reveals a history or extraordinary diversity and interdependence. His journey through this symbolic ecosystem, struggling to survive in its lands of origin, leads him eventually to diaspora communities in America and Europe. Is this the final domain of these forgotten kingdoms? Gerard Russell's account of these colourful pasts, precarious presents and unknown futures will be of interest to scholars of religion, culture, the Middle East, and a wider non-specialist readership. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Brett Hendrickson, "Border Medicine: A Transcultural History of Mexican American Curanderismo" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/17/brett-hendrickson-border-medicine-a-transcultural-history-of-mexican-american-curanderismo-nyu-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/17/brett-hendrickson-border-medicine-a-transcultural-history-of-mexican-american-curanderismo-nyu-press-2014/#comments Thu, 17 Sep 2015 11:46:06 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/17/brett-hendrickson-border-medicine-a-transcultural-history-of-mexican-american-curanderismo-nyu-press-2014/

Brett Hendrickson

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Mexican American religious healing – often called curanderismo – is a vital component of life in the US-Mexican borderlands. In his book Border Medicine: A Transcultural History of Mexican American Curanderismo (New York University Press, 2014) – Brett Hendrickson tracks healers going back to the nineteenth century and even before. He argues that these healing practices were never only Mexican American nor were they a sign of an inability to develop modern bio-medicine. They have in fact been shaped in a transcultural context where ideas about metaphysical healing and the efficacy of gifted individuals circulated among Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Anglo-American settlers. Each population has contributed to the development and growing popularity of folk curanderismo.

Brett Hendrickson is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/17/brett-hendrickson-border-medicine-a-transcultural-history-of-mexican-american-curanderismo-nyu-press-2014/feed/ 0 0:46:08 Brett HendricksonView on AmazonMexican American religious healing – often called curanderismo – is a vital component of life in the US-Mexican borderlands. In his book Border Medicine: A Transcultural History of Mexican American Curande[...] Brett HendricksonView on AmazonMexican American religious healing – often called curanderismo – is a vital component of life in the US-Mexican borderlands. In his book Border Medicine: A Transcultural History of Mexican American Curanderismo (New York University Press, 2014) – Brett Hendrickson tracks healers going back to the nineteenth century and even before. He argues that these healing practices were never only Mexican American nor were they a sign of an inability to develop modern bio-medicine. They have in fact been shaped in a transcultural context where ideas about metaphysical healing and the efficacy of gifted individuals circulated among Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Anglo-American settlers. Each population has contributed to the development and growing popularity of folk curanderismo. Brett Hendrickson is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Lafayette College in Pennsylvania. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Christopher R. Duncan, "Violence and Vengeance: Religious Conflict and Its Aftermath in Eastern Indonesia " http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/15/christopher-r-duncan-violence-and-vengeance-religious-conflict-and-its-aftermath-in-eastern-indonesia-cornell-up-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/15/christopher-r-duncan-violence-and-vengeance-religious-conflict-and-its-aftermath-in-eastern-indonesia-cornell-up-2013/#comments Tue, 15 Sep 2015 09:59:22 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/15/christopher-r-duncan-violence-and-vengeance-religious-conflict-and-its-aftermath-in-eastern-indonesia-cornell-up-2013/

Christopher R. Duncan

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Researching the communal killings that occurred in North Maluku, Indonesia during 1999 and 2000, Christopher Duncan was struck by how participants "experienced the violence as a religious conflict and continue to remember it that way", yet outsiders–among them academics, journalists, and NGO workers–have tended to dismiss or downplay its religious features. Agreeing that we need to move beyond essentialist explanations, Duncan nevertheless insists that the challenge for scholars "is to explain the role of religion in the violence without essentializing it".

In Violence and Vengeance: Religious Conflict and Its Aftermath in Eastern Indonesia (Cornell University Press, 2013) he takes up the challenge. Drawing on over a decade of research in North Maluku, and informed by time spent in the region prior to the conflict, Duncan speaks with impressive authority about the before, during and after of the bloodshed. Utilizing work by scholars of political violence and the management of memory like Stanley Tambiah and Steve Stern, he shows how participants themselves produced and reproduced master narratives of holy warfare. In the process, he critiques scholarship that overstates elite agendas and machinations, remaining too focused on the causes of violence and losing sight of how, in the words of Gerry Van Klinken, "a runaway war can become decoupled from its initial conditions".

Violence and Vengeance makes a powerful case for why study of vernacular understandings of conflict matter. The book also is exemplary in demonstrating how such study can and should be done.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/15/christopher-r-duncan-violence-and-vengeance-religious-conflict-and-its-aftermath-in-eastern-indonesia-cornell-up-2013/feed/ 0 0:59:53 Christopher R. DuncanView on AmazonResearching the communal killings that occurred in North Maluku, Indonesia during 1999 and 2000, Christopher Duncan was struck by how participants "experienced the violence as a religious conflict and continue to r[...] Christopher R. DuncanView on AmazonResearching the communal killings that occurred in North Maluku, Indonesia during 1999 and 2000, Christopher Duncan was struck by how participants "experienced the violence as a religious conflict and continue to remember it that way", yet outsiders–among them academics, journalists, and NGO workers–have tended to dismiss or downplay its religious features. Agreeing that we need to move beyond essentialist explanations, Duncan nevertheless insists that the challenge for scholars "is to explain the role of religion in the violence without essentializing it". In Violence and Vengeance: Religious Conflict and Its Aftermath in Eastern Indonesia (Cornell University Press, 2013) he takes up the challenge. Drawing on over a decade of research in North Maluku, and informed by time spent in the region prior to the conflict, Duncan speaks with impressive authority about the before, during and after of the bloodshed. Utilizing work by scholars of political violence and the management of memory like Stanley Tambiah and Steve Stern, he shows how participants themselves produced and reproduced master narratives of holy warfare. In the process, he critiques scholarship that overstates elite agendas and machinations, remaining too focused on the causes of violence and losing sight of how, in the words of Gerry Van Klinken, "a runaway war can become decoupled from its initial conditions". Violence and Vengeance makes a powerful case for why study of vernacular understandings of conflict matter. The book also is exemplary in demonstrating how such study can and should be done. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Bruce A. Bradley, Michael B. Collins, and Andrew Hemmings, "Clovis Technology" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/12/bruce-a-bradley-et-al-clovis-technology-international-monographs-in-prehistory-2010/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/12/bruce-a-bradley-et-al-clovis-technology-international-monographs-in-prehistory-2010/#comments Sat, 12 Sep 2015 11:52:34 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/12/bruce-a-bradley-et-al-clovis-technology-international-monographs-in-prehistory-2010/

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13,000-years ago, the people of the first identifiable culture in North America were hunting mammoth and mastodon, bison, and anything else they could launch their darts and spears at, and undoubtedly, most assuredly, they themselves were being hunted by gigantic short-faced bears, America lions and saber-toothed cats. Thus, in order to survive life in the Pleistocene, Clovis people developed a sophisticated tool and weapon technology. Clovis Technology (International Monographs in Prehistory, 2010) describes it in a step by step, easy to understand way using simple, common-sense terms with photos and drawings that makes a complex subject an absolute joy to read. Three (3) Paleoindian specialists, Bruce Bradley, Michael Collins and Andrew Hemmings, (with important contributions by Marilyn Shoberg, and Jon Lohse) have written a "must have" book for anyone interested in lithic, bone or ivory analysis, not just Clovis technology. The interview with Andrew Hemmings goes deep into the weeds of Clovis Technology and discusses new discoveries and information.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/12/bruce-a-bradley-et-al-clovis-technology-international-monographs-in-prehistory-2010/feed/ 0 1:52:06 View on Amazon13,000-years ago, the people of the first identifiable culture in North America were hunting mammoth and mastodon, bison, and anything else they could launch their darts and spears at, and undoubtedly, most assuredly, they themselves w[...] View on Amazon13,000-years ago, the people of the first identifiable culture in North America were hunting mammoth and mastodon, bison, and anything else they could launch their darts and spears at, and undoubtedly, most assuredly, they themselves were being hunted by gigantic short-faced bears, America lions and saber-toothed cats. Thus, in order to survive life in the Pleistocene, Clovis people developed a sophisticated tool and weapon technology. Clovis Technology (International Monographs in Prehistory, 2010) describes it in a step by step, easy to understand way using simple, common-sense terms with photos and drawings that makes a complex subject an absolute joy to read. Three (3) Paleoindian specialists, Bruce Bradley, Michael Collins and Andrew Hemmings, (with important contributions by Marilyn Shoberg, and Jon Lohse) have written a "must have" book for anyone interested in lithic, bone or ivory analysis, not just Clovis technology. The interview with Andrew Hemmings goes deep into the weeds of Clovis Technology and discusses new discoveries and information. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Lene Auestad, "Respect, Plurality, and Prejudice: A Psychoanalytical and Philosophical Enquiry into the Dynamics of Social Exclusion and Discrimination" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/11/lene-auestad-respect-plurality-and-prejudice-karnac-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/11/lene-auestad-respect-plurality-and-prejudice-karnac-2015/#comments Fri, 11 Sep 2015 12:49:41 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/11/lene-auestad-respect-plurality-and-prejudice-karnac-2015/

Lene Auestad

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Lene Auestad, PhD, is Research Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Oslo, and affiliated with the Centre for Studies of the Holocaust and Religious Minorities, Oslo. She currently resides in the UK to pursuing long-standing interests in British psychoanalysis. Working at the interface of psychoanalytic thinking and ethics/political theory, her writing has focused on the themes of emotions, prejudice and minority rights.

Her books include:

  • Respect, Plurality, and Prejudice: A Psychoanalytical and Philosophical Enquiry into the Dynamics of Social Exclusion and Discrimination (Karnac, 2015)
  • Nationalism and the Body Politic. Psychoanalysis and the Rise of Ethnocentrism and Xenophobia (Karnac, 2014)
  • Psychoanalysis and Politics – Exclusion and the Politics of Representation (Karnac, 2012)
  • Action, Freedom, Humanity – Encounters with Hannah Arendt (in Norwegian)

Auestad founded and co-directs the interdisciplinary conference series "Psychoanalysis and Politics," which aims to address how crucial contemporary political issues may be fruitfully analyzed through psychoanalytic theory and vice versa – how political phenomena may reflect back on psychoanalytic thinking.

In the book we'll be discussing today, Respect, Plurality, and Prejudice: A Psychoanalytical and Philosophical Enquiry into the Dynamics of Social Exclusion and Discrimination (Karnac, 2015), Auestad brings together psychoanalytic theory, philosophy, and sociology to create a bold and lively study of prejudice and its causes and effects at personal and social levels. The scope of her work is thrilling, moving from a clear investigation of how the unconscious and primary process play out in the phenomena of racism and prejudice; to the ethical issues of hate speech; to an exciting mash-up of Adorno and Bion on the implications of the authoritarian personality. But, following the example of Hannah Arendt, Auestad does not rest in the realm of detached theory, rather, she draws lessons from experience and current news headlines, exploring abuses and prejudice related to treatment of asylum seekers and migrants. Auestad is rigorous and thorough intellectually, but also uncommonly willing to consider how everyone plays a role in the workings of prejudice– including philosophers and psychoanalysts. During the interview, we attempt both to consider the content of Auestad's study, but also to tell the intellectual story of her efforts to work across disciplines in ways that hold great promise for using psychoanalytic theory to understand social space.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/11/lene-auestad-respect-plurality-and-prejudice-karnac-2015/feed/ 0 0:54:22 Lene AuestadView on AmazonLene Auestad, PhD, is Research Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Oslo, and affiliated with the Centre for Studies of the Holocaust and Religious Minorities, Oslo. She currently resides in the UK to pursuing long-sta[...] Lene AuestadView on AmazonLene Auestad, PhD, is Research Fellow in Philosophy at the University of Oslo, and affiliated with the Centre for Studies of the Holocaust and Religious Minorities, Oslo. She currently resides in the UK to pursuing long-standing interests in British psychoanalysis. Working at the interface of psychoanalytic thinking and ethics/political theory, her writing has focused on the themes of emotions, prejudice and minority rights. Her books include: Respect, Plurality, and Prejudice: A Psychoanalytical and Philosophical Enquiry into the Dynamics of Social Exclusion and Discrimination (Karnac, 2015) Nationalism and the Body Politic. Psychoanalysis and the Rise of Ethnocentrism and Xenophobia (Karnac, 2014) Psychoanalysis and Politics – Exclusion and the Politics of Representation (Karnac, 2012) Action, Freedom, Humanity – Encounters with Hannah Arendt (in Norwegian) Auestad founded and co-directs the interdisciplinary conference series "Psychoanalysis and Politics," which aims to address how crucial contemporary political issues may be fruitfully analyzed through psychoanalytic theory and vice versa – how political phenomena may reflect back on psychoanalytic thinking. In the book we'll be discussing today, Respect, Plurality, and Prejudice: A Psychoanalytical and Philosophical Enquiry into the Dynamics of Social Exclusion and Discrimination (Karnac, 2015), Auestad brings together psychoanalytic theory, philosophy, and sociology to create a bold and lively study of prejudice and its causes and effects at personal and social levels. The scope of her work is thrilling, moving from a clear investigation of how the unconscious and primary process play out in the phenomena of racism and prejudice; to the ethical issues of hate speech; to an exciting mash-up of Adorno and Bion on the implications of the authoritarian personality. But, following the example of Hannah Arendt, Auestad does not rest in the realm of detached theory, rather, she draws lessons from experience and current news headlines, exploring abuses and prejudice related to treatment of asylum seekers and migrants. Auestad is rigorous and thorough intellectually, but also uncommonly willing to consider how everyone plays a role in the workings of prejudice– including philosophers and psychoanalysts. During the interview, we attempt both to consider the content of Auestad's study, but also to tell the intellectual story of her efforts to work across disciplines in ways that hold great promise for using psychoanalytic theory to understand social space. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Kristin Peterson, "Speculative Markets: Drug Circuits and Derivative Life in Nigeria" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/10/kristin-peterson-speculative-markets-drug-circuits-and-derivative-life-in-nigeria-duke-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/10/kristin-peterson-speculative-markets-drug-circuits-and-derivative-life-in-nigeria-duke-up-2015/#comments Thu, 10 Sep 2015 12:59:22 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/10/kristin-peterson-speculative-markets-drug-circuits-and-derivative-life-in-nigeria-duke-up-2015/

Kristin Peterson

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Kristin Peterson's new ethnography looks carefully at the Nigerian pharmaceutical market, paying special attention to the ways that the drug trade links West Africa within a larger global economy. Speculative Markets: Drug Circuits and Derivative Life in Nigeria (Duke University Press, 2015) takes reads into a story that is part medical anthropology, part careful analysis of global economy, and shows that understanding one is vital to understanding the other in the modern West African pharmaceutical landscape. Peterson pays special attention to the Idumota market, an area that was strictly residential in the 1970s and has since become one of the largest West African points of drug distribution for pharmaceuticals and other materials from all over the world. Peterson looks at the consequences of major local and global historical factors in that transformation, including civil war in the late 1960s and migration that followed, a 1970s oil boom and bust, and changes in the global pharmaceutical market in the 1980s. By the early 1980s, Nigeria was deep into an economic crisis that had profound implications for the production, circulation, and marketing of pharmaceuticals. The pharmaceutical industry remade itself by becoming tied to the speculative marketplace, with wide-ranging implications that included the rise of new professional relationships & market formations in Nigeria, new relationships with firms in China and India, new forms of speculation, and new questions about the ontology of markets. Peterson demonstrates that these transformations continue to have important consequences for the bodies of individual Nigerians, including major problems with drug resistance and a mismatch between existing drug therapies and existing diseases. The book avoids the usual discourse of corporate greed, instead focusing on the "structural logics of pharmaceutical capital through which corporate practices can be understood." It is a timely and fascinating study.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/10/kristin-peterson-speculative-markets-drug-circuits-and-derivative-life-in-nigeria-duke-up-2015/feed/ 0 1:03:17 Kristin PetersonView on AmazonKristin Peterson's new ethnography looks carefully at the Nigerian pharmaceutical market, paying special attention to the ways that the drug trade links West Africa within a larger global economy. Speculative Markets: [...] Kristin PetersonView on AmazonKristin Peterson's new ethnography looks carefully at the Nigerian pharmaceutical market, paying special attention to the ways that the drug trade links West Africa within a larger global economy. Speculative Markets: Drug Circuits and Derivative Life in Nigeria (Duke University Press, 2015) takes reads into a story that is part medical anthropology, part careful analysis of global economy, and shows that understanding one is vital to understanding the other in the modern West African pharmaceutical landscape. Peterson pays special attention to the Idumota market, an area that was strictly residential in the 1970s and has since become one of the largest West African points of drug distribution for pharmaceuticals and other materials from all over the world. Peterson looks at the consequences of major local and global historical factors in that transformation, including civil war in the late 1960s and migration that followed, a 1970s oil boom and bust, and changes in the global pharmaceutical market in the 1980s. By the early 1980s, Nigeria was deep into an economic crisis that had profound implications for the production, circulation, and marketing of pharmaceuticals. The pharmaceutical industry remade itself by becoming tied to the speculative marketplace, with wide-ranging implications that included the rise of new professional relationships & market formations in Nigeria, new relationships with firms in China and India, new forms of speculation, and new questions about the ontology of markets. Peterson demonstrates that these transformations continue to have important consequences for the bodies of individual Nigerians, including major problems with drug resistance and a mismatch between existing drug therapies and existing diseases. The book avoids the usual discourse of corporate greed, instead focusing on the "structural logics of pharmaceutical capital through which corporate practices can be understood." It is a timely and fascinating study. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Liz McFall, "Devising Consumption: Cultural Economies of Insurance, Credit and Spending" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/02/liz-mcfall-devising-consumption-cultural-economies-of-insurance-credit-and-spending-routledge-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/02/liz-mcfall-devising-consumption-cultural-economies-of-insurance-credit-and-spending-routledge-2014/#comments Wed, 02 Sep 2015 17:56:51 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/02/liz-mcfall-devising-consumption-cultural-economies-of-insurance-credit-and-spending-routledge-2014/

Liz McFall

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The role of financial services in individuals' and communities' everyday lives is more important than ever. In Devising Consumption: Cultural Economies of Insurance, Credit and Spending (Routledge, 2014), Liz McFall charts the rise of one particular element of financial services, door-to-door sales, to understand the role of insurance and credit in society. In doing so McFall aims to 'ventriloquise the lives and consumption practices of the silent poor', as well as charting a the history of a very neglected element of the story of finance's role in contemporary life. The book contains a wealth of historical data, alongside a theoretical engagement with the meaning of 'the device' within current social theoretical literature. Moreover the book offers reflections on the role and workings of markets and states, both with regard to finance and more broadly to the government of social life. The combination of these perspectives offers an important new lens through which to understand the sociology of consumption and thus, more generally, the social world itself.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/09/02/liz-mcfall-devising-consumption-cultural-economies-of-insurance-credit-and-spending-routledge-2014/feed/ 0 0:45:18 Liz McFallView on AmazonThe role of financial services in individuals' and communities' everyday lives is more important than ever. In Devising Consumption: Cultural Economies of Insurance, Credit and Spending (Routledge, 2014), Liz McFall charts [...] Liz McFallView on AmazonThe role of financial services in individuals' and communities' everyday lives is more important than ever. In Devising Consumption: Cultural Economies of Insurance, Credit and Spending (Routledge, 2014), Liz McFall charts the rise of one particular element of financial services, door-to-door sales, to understand the role of insurance and credit in society. In doing so McFall aims to 'ventriloquise the lives and consumption practices of the silent poor', as well as charting a the history of a very neglected element of the story of finance's role in contemporary life. The book contains a wealth of historical data, alongside a theoretical engagement with the meaning of 'the device' within current social theoretical literature. Moreover the book offers reflections on the role and workings of markets and states, both with regard to finance and more broadly to the government of social life. The combination of these perspectives offers an important new lens through which to understand the sociology of consumption and thus, more generally, the social world itself. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Douglas Bamforth, "The Allen Site: A Paleoindian Camp in Southwestern Nebraska" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/25/douglas-b-bamforth-et-al-the-allen-site-a-paleoindian-camp-in-southwestern-nebraska-u-of-new-mexico-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/25/douglas-b-bamforth-et-al-the-allen-site-a-paleoindian-camp-in-southwestern-nebraska-u-of-new-mexico-press-2015/#comments Tue, 25 Aug 2015 14:58:53 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/25/douglas-b-bamforth-et-al-the-allen-site-a-paleoindian-camp-in-southwestern-nebraska-u-of-new-mexico-press-2015/

Douglas Bamforth

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It's the ultimate cold case: a mountain of 10,000-year old evidence excavated and stored in hundreds of boxes that sat unopened and nearly forgotten in the basement of a museum for nearly 60-years. The Allen Site: A Paleoindian Camp in Southwestern Nebraska  (University of New Mexico Press, 2007) by Douglas Bamforth is the site report of an early excavation in southwestern Nebraska, a Paleoindian camp site on Medicine Creek, now permanently submerged under the waters of Harry Strunk reservoir. An extraordinary example of dedication and professionalism in the field of archaeology, The Allen Site combines the work of eleven (11) contributors. Superbly written in clear, easy to understand language, and illustrated with photos, maps and drawings, The Allen Site documents the earliest presence of freshwater mussels in the Paleoindian diet, compelling evidence of Paleoindian children learning the craft of flintknapping, and intriguing evidence for Paleoindian fishing and netting. If you are interested in Paleoindian camp life, the archaeology beyond the massive bison bonebeds, this interview is a gem, and most definitely, you need a copy of The Allen Site in you library.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/25/douglas-b-bamforth-et-al-the-allen-site-a-paleoindian-camp-in-southwestern-nebraska-u-of-new-mexico-press-2015/feed/ 0 1:19:57 Douglas BamforthView on AmazonIt's the ultimate cold case: a mountain of 10,000-year old evidence excavated and stored in hundreds of boxes that sat unopened and nearly forgotten in the basement of a museum for nearly 60-years. The Allen Site: A Pal[...] Douglas BamforthView on AmazonIt's the ultimate cold case: a mountain of 10,000-year old evidence excavated and stored in hundreds of boxes that sat unopened and nearly forgotten in the basement of a museum for nearly 60-years. The Allen Site: A Paleoindian Camp in Southwestern Nebraska  (University of New Mexico Press, 2007) by Douglas Bamforth is the site report of an early excavation in southwestern Nebraska, a Paleoindian camp site on Medicine Creek, now permanently submerged under the waters of Harry Strunk reservoir. An extraordinary example of dedication and professionalism in the field of archaeology, The Allen Site combines the work of eleven (11) contributors. Superbly written in clear, easy to understand language, and illustrated with photos, maps and drawings, The Allen Site documents the earliest presence of freshwater mussels in the Paleoindian diet, compelling evidence of Paleoindian children learning the craft of flintknapping, and intriguing evidence for Paleoindian fishing and netting. If you are interested in Paleoindian camp life, the archaeology beyond the massive bison bonebeds, this interview is a gem, and most definitely, you need a copy of The Allen Site in you library. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Stefan Ecks, "Eating Drugs: Psychopharmaceutical Pluralism in India" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/19/stefan-ecks-eating-drugs-psychopharmaceutical-pluralism-in-india-nyu-press-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/19/stefan-ecks-eating-drugs-psychopharmaceutical-pluralism-in-india-nyu-press-2013/#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2015 11:24:05 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/19/stefan-ecks-eating-drugs-psychopharmaceutical-pluralism-in-india-nyu-press-2013/

Stefan Ecks

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Drugs exist that are meant to help people feel better. The doctors who prescribe them might believe that they work, while their patients do not. In explaining the drugs to their patients, should those doctors use the medical terminology they themselves use – which might not be immediately understandable to their patients – or should they translate the description into terms more comfortable and familiar to the patient? And what are the practical and ethical consequences of each decision? Stefan Ecks' new book carefully considers these problems in the context of health-related practices in modern Calcutta. Eating Drugs: Psychopharmaceutical Pluralism in India (NYU Press, 2013) looks successively at the different and overlapping medical and healing contexts that together make up a significant part of the medical marketplace in Calcutta. Ch. 1 treats popular notions that include the importance of the belly as the "somatic center of good health," the power of the mind to regulate good health, and the connection between modernity and pollution as causes of illness. Ch. 2 looks at Ayurvedic practices in Calcutta. It reflects on some of the most important ways that Ayurveda is changing in India – especially at the levels of practitioner training, language, and the patient-physician relationship – despite the fact that the centrality of food and digestion has remained constant. Ch. 3 looks closely at homeopathy, the second most popular type of medicine in Bengal, and focuses on the principles, histories, and pluralities of homeopathic practices in Calcutta. Ch. 4 looks at the ways that Calcutta psychiatrists position themselves with respect to popular beliefs about psychopharmaceuticals, general physicians, practitioners of non-biomedical treatments, and the pharmaceutical industry. This chapter pays special attention to how Bengali doctors use metaphors to help patients understand and respond to psychiatric diagnoses, with comparisons to nature, the Ganges river, fairytales, everyday over-the-counter drugs, diabetes, and food. The conclusion explores a key argument of the book, proposing that "patients' suspicions of psychopharmaceuticals are based on suspicions of biomedicine's 'magic bullet' model of drug effects," looking at the implications of this conclusion, and considering the possible broader impacts of this study beyond Calcutta. It's a fascinating study of potential interest to historians and anthropologists of medicine and healing, as well as readers interested in learning more about the medical marketplace of modern India and anyone interested in modern psychopharmaceuticals.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/19/stefan-ecks-eating-drugs-psychopharmaceutical-pluralism-in-india-nyu-press-2013/feed/ 0 1:19:04 Stefan EcksView on AmazonDrugs exist that are meant to help people feel better. The doctors who prescribe them might believe that they work, while their patients do not. In explaining the drugs to their patients, should those doctors use the medical[...] Stefan EcksView on AmazonDrugs exist that are meant to help people feel better. The doctors who prescribe them might believe that they work, while their patients do not. In explaining the drugs to their patients, should those doctors use the medical terminology they themselves use – which might not be immediately understandable to their patients – or should they translate the description into terms more comfortable and familiar to the patient? And what are the practical and ethical consequences of each decision? Stefan Ecks' new book carefully considers these problems in the context of health-related practices in modern Calcutta. Eating Drugs: Psychopharmaceutical Pluralism in India (NYU Press, 2013) looks successively at the different and overlapping medical and healing contexts that together make up a significant part of the medical marketplace in Calcutta. Ch. 1 treats popular notions that include the importance of the belly as the "somatic center of good health," the power of the mind to regulate good health, and the connection between modernity and pollution as causes of illness. Ch. 2 looks at Ayurvedic practices in Calcutta. It reflects on some of the most important ways that Ayurveda is changing in India – especially at the levels of practitioner training, language, and the patient-physician relationship – despite the fact that the centrality of food and digestion has remained constant. Ch. 3 looks closely at homeopathy, the second most popular type of medicine in Bengal, and focuses on the principles, histories, and pluralities of homeopathic practices in Calcutta. Ch. 4 looks at the ways that Calcutta psychiatrists position themselves with respect to popular beliefs about psychopharmaceuticals, general physicians, practitioners of non-biomedical treatments, and the pharmaceutical industry. This chapter pays special attention to how Bengali doctors use metaphors to help patients understand and respond to psychiatric diagnoses, with comparisons to nature, the Ganges river, fairytales, everyday over-the-counter drugs, diabetes, and food. The conclusion explores a key argument of the book, proposing that "patients' suspicions of psychopharmaceuticals are based on suspicions of biomedicine's 'magic bullet' model of drug effects," looking at the implications of this conclusion, and considering the possible broader impacts of this study beyond Calcutta. It's a fascinating study of potential interest to historians and anthropologists of medicine and healing, as well as readers interested in learning more about the medical marketplace of modern India and anyone interested in modern psychopharmaceuticals. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Paul A. Christensen, "Japan, Alcoholism, and Masculinity: Suffering Sobriety in Tokyo" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/19/paul-a-christensen-japan-alcoholism-and-masculinity-suffering-sobriety-in-tokyo-lexington-books-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/19/paul-a-christensen-japan-alcoholism-and-masculinity-suffering-sobriety-in-tokyo-lexington-books-2014/#comments Wed, 19 Aug 2015 10:29:35 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/19/paul-a-christensen-japan-alcoholism-and-masculinity-suffering-sobriety-in-tokyo-lexington-books-2014/

Paul A. Christensen

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Paul A. Christensen's new book is a thoughtful ethnography of drinking, drunkenness, and male sociability in modern urban Japan. Focusing on two major alcohol sobriety support groups in Japan, Alcoholics Anonymous and Danshukai, Japan, Alcoholism, and Masculinity: Suffering Sobriety in Tokyo (Lexington Books, 2014) explores the ways that admitting to and living with alcoholism in Japan challenges prevailing norms of masculinity and sociability, and looks carefully at its profound consequences for the individual sufferer. After a brief history of alcohol and drunkenness in Japan, Christensen considers the ubiquitous coding of alcohol as fun and leisurely in mass media, and directs our attention to the difficulties that this framing creates for male alcoholics. The book then moves to a discussion of historical shifts in notions of addiction in Japan, as well as contemporary debates over treatment methodologies and the ways that methodologies transplanted into Japan from the US map – or not – onto local cultural and religious realities. Christensen follows this with detailed accounts of the major support groups available to sufferers in Tokyo, the languages and bodies of alcoholic experience, and much else. Throughout the study, Christensen offers an extraordinarily sensitive treatment of the struggle of individual men to build a new selfhood while their sense of masculinity, and of a place in society, have been dismantled.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/08/19/paul-a-christensen-japan-alcoholism-and-masculinity-suffering-sobriety-in-tokyo-lexington-books-2014/feed/ 0 1:05:14 Paul A. ChristensenView on AmazonPaul A. Christensen's new book is a thoughtful ethnography of drinking, drunkenness, and male sociability in modern urban Japan. Focusing on two major alcohol sobriety support groups in Japan, Alcoholics Anonymous an[...] Paul A. ChristensenView on AmazonPaul A. Christensen's new book is a thoughtful ethnography of drinking, drunkenness, and male sociability in modern urban Japan. Focusing on two major alcohol sobriety support groups in Japan, Alcoholics Anonymous and Danshukai, Japan, Alcoholism, and Masculinity: Suffering Sobriety in Tokyo (Lexington Books, 2014) explores the ways that admitting to and living with alcoholism in Japan challenges prevailing norms of masculinity and sociability, and looks carefully at its profound consequences for the individual sufferer. After a brief history of alcohol and drunkenness in Japan, Christensen considers the ubiquitous coding of alcohol as fun and leisurely in mass media, and directs our attention to the difficulties that this framing creates for male alcoholics. The book then moves to a discussion of historical shifts in notions of addiction in Japan, as well as contemporary debates over treatment methodologies and the ways that methodologies transplanted into Japan from the US map – or not – onto local cultural and religious realities. Christensen follows this with detailed accounts of the major support groups available to sufferers in Tokyo, the languages and bodies of alcoholic experience, and much else. Throughout the study, Christensen offers an extraordinarily sensitive treatment of the struggle of individual men to build a new selfhood while their sense of masculinity, and of a place in society, have been dismantled. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Donald Nonini, "“Getting By”: Class and State Formation Among Chinese in Malaysia" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/31/donald-m-nonini-getting-by-class-and-state-formation-among-chinese-in-malaysia-cornell-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/31/donald-m-nonini-getting-by-class-and-state-formation-among-chinese-in-malaysia-cornell-up-2015/#comments Fri, 31 Jul 2015 14:06:23 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/31/donald-m-nonini-getting-by-class-and-state-formation-among-chinese-in-malaysia-cornell-up-2015/

Donald Nonini

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"Getting By": Class and State Formation Among Chinese in Malaysia (Cornell University Press, 2015) is a powerful and multilayered book that upbraids overseas Chinese studies for their neglect of class. Bringing class struggle and identity firmly to the centre of his analysis, Donald Nonini argues that scholars of the overseas Chinese have not accounted for class and its role in state formation adequately. Instead, an abiding concern for articulating an imagined essential "Chinese culture" causes scholars to disregard the radical dialectics of state formation and antagonism that crisscross time and space in Southeast Asian postcolonies. Nevertheless, class relations have been fundamental to Malaysian society, and especially, to the making of meaning among its racially differentiated citizenry.

Drawing on over three decades of fieldwork, from 1978 to the 2000s, "Getting By" is full of detail yet highly readable. Sometimes provocative but always reflective, it is throughout concerned with rethinking premises and questioning assumed knowledge–both of the state in Malaysia and of the academic discipline. In parts political history, in other parts political ethnography, at each point the book couples Nonini's concern for historical contingency and insularity with larger debates on hegemony, struggle and domination.

At a time that it seems to be the fashion for academics to hobnob with policymakers rather than hang out with petty traders or lorry drivers, to demonstrate competencies rather than take up causes, and to produce thought bubbles rather than do deep longitudinal research, "Getting By" is a beautifully unfashionable book that reminds its readers of how much can be learned from staying put, and from thinking and writing plainly about people and things that clearly matter.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/31/donald-m-nonini-getting-by-class-and-state-formation-among-chinese-in-malaysia-cornell-up-2015/feed/ 0 1:09:32 Donald NoniniView on Amazon"Getting By": Class and State Formation Among Chinese in Malaysia (Cornell University Press, 2015) is a powerful and multilayered book that upbraids overseas Chinese studies for their neglect of class. Bringing class stru[...] Donald NoniniView on Amazon"Getting By": Class and State Formation Among Chinese in Malaysia (Cornell University Press, 2015) is a powerful and multilayered book that upbraids overseas Chinese studies for their neglect of class. Bringing class struggle and identity firmly to the centre of his analysis, Donald Nonini argues that scholars of the overseas Chinese have not accounted for class and its role in state formation adequately. Instead, an abiding concern for articulating an imagined essential "Chinese culture" causes scholars to disregard the radical dialectics of state formation and antagonism that crisscross time and space in Southeast Asian postcolonies. Nevertheless, class relations have been fundamental to Malaysian society, and especially, to the making of meaning among its racially differentiated citizenry. Drawing on over three decades of fieldwork, from 1978 to the 2000s, "Getting By" is full of detail yet highly readable. Sometimes provocative but always reflective, it is throughout concerned with rethinking premises and questioning assumed knowledge–both of the state in Malaysia and of the academic discipline. In parts political history, in other parts political ethnography, at each point the book couples Nonini's concern for historical contingency and insularity with larger debates on hegemony, struggle and domination. At a time that it seems to be the fashion for academics to hobnob with policymakers rather than hang out with petty traders or lorry drivers, to demonstrate competencies rather than take up causes, and to produce thought bubbles rather than do deep longitudinal research, "Getting By" is a beautifully unfashionable book that reminds its readers of how much can be learned from staying put, and from thinking and writing plainly about people and things that clearly matter. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone, "Queerness in Heavy Metal Music: Metal Bent" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/26/amber-r-clifford-napoleone-queerness-in-heavy-metal-music-metal-bent-routledge-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/26/amber-r-clifford-napoleone-queerness-in-heavy-metal-music-metal-bent-routledge-2015/#comments Sun, 26 Jul 2015 16:41:22 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/26/amber-r-clifford-napoleone-queerness-in-heavy-metal-music-metal-bent-routledge-2015/

Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone

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Much of the scholarship on heavy metal has assumed that the primary audience is straight white males, who are likely sexist and homophobic.  In her new book, Queerness in Heavy Metal Music: Metal Bent (Routledge, 2015), Amber Clifford-Napoleone challenges these assumptions through her ethnographic study of self-identified queer performers and fans of heavy metal. She also reveals some surprising links between queer and heavy metal communities.

In this podcast, we discuss the history of heavy metal, its connection to the post-World War II leather scene, and how heavy metal's embrace of non-normative lifestyles and cultures has allowed queer fans and performers an accepted space within heavy metal. In the interview, Clifford Napoleone explores why heavy metal has been a welcoming space for queer fans. We also talk about the role of particular musicians and acts, such as Judas Priest and Joan Jett.

Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Curator of Nance Collections at the University of Central Missouri. In addition to her research on heavy metal, she studies gender in jazz in Kansas City and blogs on heavy metal.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/26/amber-r-clifford-napoleone-queerness-in-heavy-metal-music-metal-bent-routledge-2015/feed/ 0 0:49:50 Amber R. Clifford-NapoleoneView on AmazonMuch of the scholarship on heavy metal has assumed that the primary audience is straight white males, who are likely sexist and homophobic.  In her new book, Queerness in Heavy Metal Music: Metal Bent (Routl[...] Amber R. Clifford-NapoleoneView on AmazonMuch of the scholarship on heavy metal has assumed that the primary audience is straight white males, who are likely sexist and homophobic.  In her new book, Queerness in Heavy Metal Music: Metal Bent (Routledge, 2015), Amber Clifford-Napoleone challenges these assumptions through her ethnographic study of self-identified queer performers and fans of heavy metal. She also reveals some surprising links between queer and heavy metal communities. In this podcast, we discuss the history of heavy metal, its connection to the post-World War II leather scene, and how heavy metal's embrace of non-normative lifestyles and cultures has allowed queer fans and performers an accepted space within heavy metal. In the interview, Clifford Napoleone explores why heavy metal has been a welcoming space for queer fans. We also talk about the role of particular musicians and acts, such as Judas Priest and Joan Jett. Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Curator of Nance Collections at the University of Central Missouri. In addition to her research on heavy metal, she studies gender in jazz in Kansas City and blogs on heavy metal. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin Lewis, "The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/21/the-indo-european-controversy-facts-and-fallacies-in-historical-linguistics-cambridge-university-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/21/the-indo-european-controversy-facts-and-fallacies-in-historical-linguistics-cambridge-university-press-2015/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 14:47:06 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/21/the-indo-european-controversy-facts-and-fallacies-in-historical-linguistics-cambridge-university-press-2015/

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Who were the Indo-Europeans? Were they all-conquering heroes? Aggressive patriarchal Kurgan horsemen, sweeping aside the peaceful civilizations of Old Europe? Weed-smoking drug dealers rolling across Eurasia in a cannabis-induced haze? Or slow-moving but inexorable farmers from Anatolia?

These are just some of the many possibilities discussed in the scholarly literature. But in 2012, a New York Times article announced that the problem had been solved, by a team of innovative biologists applying computational tools to language change. In an article published in Science, they claimed to have found decisive support for the Anatolian hypothesis.

In their book, The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics (Cambridge University Press, 2015), Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin Lewis make the case that this conclusion is premature, and based on unwarranted assumptions. In this interview, Asya and Martin talk to me about the history of the Indo-European homeland question, the problems they see in the Science article, and the form that a good theory of Indo-European origins needs to take.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/21/the-indo-european-controversy-facts-and-fallacies-in-historical-linguistics-cambridge-university-press-2015/feed/ 0 1:00:32 View on AmazonWho were the Indo-Europeans? Were they all-conquering heroes? Aggressive patriarchal Kurgan horsemen, sweeping aside the peaceful civilizations of Old Europe? Weed-smoking drug dealers rolling across Eurasia in a cannabis-induced haze?[...] View on AmazonWho were the Indo-Europeans? Were they all-conquering heroes? Aggressive patriarchal Kurgan horsemen, sweeping aside the peaceful civilizations of Old Europe? Weed-smoking drug dealers rolling across Eurasia in a cannabis-induced haze? Or slow-moving but inexorable farmers from Anatolia? These are just some of the many possibilities discussed in the scholarly literature. But in 2012, a New York Times article announced that the problem had been solved, by a team of innovative biologists applying computational tools to language change. In an article published in Science, they claimed to have found decisive support for the Anatolian hypothesis. In their book, The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics (Cambridge University Press, 2015), Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin Lewis make the case that this conclusion is premature, and based on unwarranted assumptions. In this interview, Asya and Martin talk to me about the history of the Indo-European homeland question, the problems they see in the Science article, and the form that a good theory of Indo-European origins needs to take. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Kocku von Stuckrad, "The Scientification of Religion: An Historical Study of Discursive Change, 1800-2000" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/06/kocku-von-stuckrad-the-scientification-of-religion-an-historical-study-of-discursive-change-1800-2000-de-gruyter-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/06/kocku-von-stuckrad-the-scientification-of-religion-an-historical-study-of-discursive-change-1800-2000-de-gruyter-2014/#comments Mon, 06 Jul 2015 14:54:41 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/06/kocku-von-stuckrad-the-scientification-of-religion-an-historical-study-of-discursive-change-1800-2000-de-gruyter-2014/

Kocku von Stuckrad

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Science and religion are often paired as diametric opposites. However, the boundaries of these two fields were not always as clear as they seem to be today. In The Scientification of Religion: An Historical Study of Discursive Change, 1800-2000 (De Gruyter, 2014), Kocku von Stuckrad, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Groningen, demonstrates how the construction of what constitutes 'religion' and 'science' was a relational process that emerged with the competition between various systems of knowledge. In this book, von Stuckrad traces the transformation and perpetuation of religious discourses as a result of their entanglement with secular academic discourses. In the first half of the book, he presents the discursive constructions of  'religion' and 'science' through the disciplines of astrology, astronomy, psychology, alchemy, chemistry, and scientific experimentation more generally. The second half of the book explores the power of academic legitimization of knowledge in emerging European modernities. Here, the discursive entanglements of professional and participant explanations of modern practices shaped and solidified those realities. Key figures in the history of the field of Religious Studies, such as Martin Buber, Gershom Scholem, Rudolf Otto, and Mircea Eliade, played instrumental roles in legitimizing the authority of mysticism, goddess worship, and shamanism. Ultimately, what we discover is that 'religion' and 'science' are not so much distinctive spheres but elastic systems that arise within the particular circumstances of secular modernity. In our conversation we discussed discursive approaches to the study of religion, the Theosophical Society, marginalized forms of knowledge, the occult sciences, Jewish mysticism, secularization, nature-focused spiritualities, experiential knowledge, pagan religious practices, and 'modern' science.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/06/kocku-von-stuckrad-the-scientification-of-religion-an-historical-study-of-discursive-change-1800-2000-de-gruyter-2014/feed/ 0 0:54:10 Kocku von StuckradView on AmazonScience and religion are often paired as diametric opposites. However, the boundaries of these two fields were not always as clear as they seem to be today. In The Scientification of Religion: An Historical Study of D[...] Kocku von StuckradView on AmazonScience and religion are often paired as diametric opposites. However, the boundaries of these two fields were not always as clear as they seem to be today. In The Scientification of Religion: An Historical Study of Discursive Change, 1800-2000 (De Gruyter, 2014), Kocku von Stuckrad, Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Groningen, demonstrates how the construction of what constitutes 'religion' and 'science' was a relational process that emerged with the competition between various systems of knowledge. In this book, von Stuckrad traces the transformation and perpetuation of religious discourses as a result of their entanglement with secular academic discourses. In the first half of the book, he presents the discursive constructions of  'religion' and 'science' through the disciplines of astrology, astronomy, psychology, alchemy, chemistry, and scientific experimentation more generally. The second half of the book explores the power of academic legitimization of knowledge in emerging European modernities. Here, the discursive entanglements of professional and participant explanations of modern practices shaped and solidified those realities. Key figures in the history of the field of Religious Studies, such as Martin Buber, Gershom Scholem, Rudolf Otto, and Mircea Eliade, played instrumental roles in legitimizing the authority of mysticism, goddess worship, and shamanism. Ultimately, what we discover is that 'religion' and 'science' are not so much distinctive spheres but elastic systems that arise within the particular circumstances of secular modernity. In our conversation we discussed discursive approaches to the study of religion, the Theosophical Society, marginalized forms of knowledge, the occult sciences, Jewish mysticism, secularization, nature-focused spiritualities, experiential knowledge, pagan religious practices, and 'modern' science. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Joyce B. Flueckiger, "When the World Becomes Female: Guises of a South Indian Goddess" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/03/joyce-b-flueckiger-when-the-world-becomes-female-guises-of-a-south-indian-goddess-indiana-up-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/03/joyce-b-flueckiger-when-the-world-becomes-female-guises-of-a-south-indian-goddess-indiana-up-2013/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 14:13:51 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/03/joyce-b-flueckiger-when-the-world-becomes-female-guises-of-a-south-indian-goddess-indiana-up-2013/

Joyce B. Flueckiger

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Joyce B. Flueckiger's new book When the World Becomes Female: Guises of a South Indian Goddess (Indiana University Press, 2013) is a rich and colorful analysis of the goddess Gangamma's festival and her devotees. During the festival men take on female guises, whilst women intensify the rituals that they perform throughout the year. The books explores the excess of the goddess and the lives of those who bear her.

 

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/07/03/joyce-b-flueckiger-when-the-world-becomes-female-guises-of-a-south-indian-goddess-indiana-up-2013/feed/ 0 0:58:13 Joyce B. FlueckigerView on AmazonJoyce B. Flueckiger's new book When the World Becomes Female: Guises of a South Indian Goddess (Indiana University Press, 2013) is a rich and colorful analysis of the goddess Gangamma's festival and her devotees. Du[...] Joyce B. FlueckigerView on AmazonJoyce B. Flueckiger's new book When the World Becomes Female: Guises of a South Indian Goddess (Indiana University Press, 2013) is a rich and colorful analysis of the goddess Gangamma's festival and her devotees. During the festival men take on female guises, whilst women intensify the rituals that they perform throughout the year. The books explores the excess of the goddess and the lives of those who bear her.   Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
J. Laurence Hare, "Excavating Nations: Archaeology, Museums, and the German-Danish Borderlands" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/28/j-laurence-hare-excavating-nations-archaeology-museums-and-the-german-danish-borderlands-u-of-toronto-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/28/j-laurence-hare-excavating-nations-archaeology-museums-and-the-german-danish-borderlands-u-of-toronto-press-2015/#comments Sun, 28 Jun 2015 15:19:01 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/28/j-laurence-hare-excavating-nations-archaeology-museums-and-the-german-danish-borderlands-u-of-toronto-press-2015/

J. Laurence Hare

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A recent book review I read began with the line "borderlands are back." It's certainly true that more and more historians have used borderland regions as the stage for some excellent work on the construction of national identities (or indifference to them) in recent years. J. Laurence Hare, Associate Professor of History at the University of Arkansas, makes a novel and highly compelling contribution to that literature with Excavating Nations: Archaeology, Museums, and the German-Danish Borderlands (University of Toronto Press, 2015). As the title suggests, the book looks at the role of antiquities and archaeology in the creation of Danish and German national identities from the early nationalist period through the twentieth century. The region between Denmark and Germany is perhaps not the place many Americans think of when they think of Scandinavia (home of wind-swept islands and fjords) or Germany (with its forests and Alpine vistas). Yet the German-Danish borderland has a very distinctive landscape all it own–of fens and moors, swamps and dikes–and that landscape contains fascinating antiquities. Unlike the Mediterranean, with its coliseums and cathedrals, the German-Danish borderland is the home of burial mounds and lost cities of the Viking Age, bog bodies and earth works, and mysterious treasures like the Golden Horns of Gallehus. Hare's book detailing the ways these artifacts of an ancient past came to stand as markers of modern identities is an elegantly written and thoroughly fascinating contribution to the expanding literature on borderlands.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/28/j-laurence-hare-excavating-nations-archaeology-museums-and-the-german-danish-borderlands-u-of-toronto-press-2015/feed/ 0 0:51:33 J. Laurence HareView on AmazonA recent book review I read began with the line "borderlands are back." It's certainly true that more and more historians have used borderland regions as the stage for some excellent work on the construction of national[...] J. Laurence HareView on AmazonA recent book review I read began with the line "borderlands are back." It's certainly true that more and more historians have used borderland regions as the stage for some excellent work on the construction of national identities (or indifference to them) in recent years. J. Laurence Hare, Associate Professor of History at the University of Arkansas, makes a novel and highly compelling contribution to that literature with Excavating Nations: Archaeology, Museums, and the German-Danish Borderlands (University of Toronto Press, 2015). As the title suggests, the book looks at the role of antiquities and archaeology in the creation of Danish and German national identities from the early nationalist period through the twentieth century. The region between Denmark and Germany is perhaps not the place many Americans think of when they think of Scandinavia (home of wind-swept islands and fjords) or Germany (with its forests and Alpine vistas). Yet the German-Danish borderland has a very distinctive landscape all it own–of fens and moors, swamps and dikes–and that landscape contains fascinating antiquities. Unlike the Mediterranean, with its coliseums and cathedrals, the German-Danish borderland is the home of burial mounds and lost cities of the Viking Age, bog bodies and earth works, and mysterious treasures like the Golden Horns of Gallehus. Hare's book detailing the ways these artifacts of an ancient past came to stand as markers of modern identities is an elegantly written and thoroughly fascinating contribution to the expanding literature on borderlands. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Gary Wilder, "Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/28/gary-wilder-freedom-time-negritude-decolonization-and-the-future-of-the-world-duke-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/28/gary-wilder-freedom-time-negritude-decolonization-and-the-future-of-the-world-duke-up-2015/#comments Sun, 28 Jun 2015 11:56:52 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/28/gary-wilder-freedom-time-negritude-decolonization-and-the-future-of-the-world-duke-up-2015/

Gary Wilder

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Gary Wilder's new book, Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World (Duke University Press, 2015) builds upon the work he began in The French Imperial Nation State: Negritude and Colonial Humanism between the Two World Wars (University of Chicago Press, 2005). Freedom Time considers the politics and poetics of Aimé Césaire and Léopold Senghor during the period 1945-1960, "thinking with" and "working through" the ways these figures anticipated a post-imperial world. The book explores notions of liberation and temporality, considering the alternatives to nationalism and the nation-state that these thinkers imagined as they looked forward to a more democratic, autonomous future on the other side of colonialism.

While The French Imperial Nation State asked readers to "rethink France," the project here is, in the author's own words, to "unthink France". Indeed, France, decolonization, and even liberation itself, are all interrogated in this work, as they were by the authors who are at the center of the project. Freedom Time is a book that takes seriously the futures envisioned by Césaire and Senghor, situating their projects historically and intellectually within contexts French and global, and considering the implications of their thought for a contemporary world still troubled by profound inequalities. It is an important book for those interested in the most urgent political questions, and in the problems and promises of freedoms past, present, and future.

At the beginning of our interview, Gary mentions a video link I sent him before we spoke. It is a video of Lauryn Hill performing "Freedom Time," a wonderful song that I was reminded of by this wonderful book.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/28/gary-wilder-freedom-time-negritude-decolonization-and-the-future-of-the-world-duke-up-2015/feed/ 0 1:00:24 Gary WilderView on AmazonGary Wilder's new book, Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World (Duke University Press, 2015) builds upon the work he began in The French Imperial Nation State: Negritude and Colonial Humanism be[...] Gary WilderView on AmazonGary Wilder's new book, Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World (Duke University Press, 2015) builds upon the work he began in The French Imperial Nation State: Negritude and Colonial Humanism between the Two World Wars (University of Chicago Press, 2005). Freedom Time considers the politics and poetics of Aimé Césaire and Léopold Senghor during the period 1945-1960, "thinking with" and "working through" the ways these figures anticipated a post-imperial world. The book explores notions of liberation and temporality, considering the alternatives to nationalism and the nation-state that these thinkers imagined as they looked forward to a more democratic, autonomous future on the other side of colonialism. While The French Imperial Nation State asked readers to "rethink France," the project here is, in the author's own words, to "unthink France". Indeed, France, decolonization, and even liberation itself, are all interrogated in this work, as they were by the authors who are at the center of the project. Freedom Time is a book that takes seriously the futures envisioned by Césaire and Senghor, situating their projects historically and intellectually within contexts French and global, and considering the implications of their thought for a contemporary world still troubled by profound inequalities. It is an important book for those interested in the most urgent political questions, and in the problems and promises of freedoms past, present, and future. At the beginning of our interview, Gary mentions a video link I sent him before we spoke. It is a video of Lauryn Hill performing "Freedom Time," a wonderful song that I was reminded of by this wonderful book. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Allison Truitt, "Dreaming of Money in Ho Chi Minh City" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/15/allison-truitt-dreaming-of-money-in-ho-chi-minh-city-u-of-washington-press-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/15/allison-truitt-dreaming-of-money-in-ho-chi-minh-city-u-of-washington-press-2013/#comments Mon, 15 Jun 2015 06:00:13 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/15/allison-truitt-dreaming-of-money-in-ho-chi-minh-city-u-of-washington-press-2013/

Allison Truitt

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There's a lot more to money than its exchange value, as Allison Truitt reveals in her smartly written and lively study, Dreaming of Money in Ho Chi Minh City (University of Washington Press, 2013) about how people in Vietnam's largest city negotiate relations with one another, the state, the global marketplace and the spirit world through dollars and dong,

On the streets of Ho Chi Minh City, remitted greenbacks cease to be the stuff of the currency trader or foreign state. Here, they take on new and distinctive roles. They mingle with their counterfeits, the one burned at cemeteries and shrines to satisfy ancestral debts, the other sent by relatives living abroad to acknowledge the debt-bond owed by those who have left the country to those who remain behind. They celebrate the transnational yet also beckon to the intimate. And, they challenge the communist party to reorder its narrative of modernity so as to maintain the primacy of its role in political and administrative affairs.

As Truitt herself puts it, Dreaming of Money in Ho Chi Minh City tells a story of "monetary pluralism rather than tightly wound institutional bets, of the sensuous pleasures of cash rather than calculations of derivatives". It also tells a story of power: of the claims to power that states make through the production of territorial currency, and of how those claims are undermined by the ways that people use money for their own purposes.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/15/allison-truitt-dreaming-of-money-in-ho-chi-minh-city-u-of-washington-press-2013/feed/ 0 1:00:03 Allison TruittView on AmazonThere's a lot more to money than its exchange value, as Allison Truitt reveals in her smartly written and lively study, Dreaming of Money in Ho Chi Minh City (University of Washington Press, 2013) about how people in Vi[...] Allison TruittView on AmazonThere's a lot more to money than its exchange value, as Allison Truitt reveals in her smartly written and lively study, Dreaming of Money in Ho Chi Minh City (University of Washington Press, 2013) about how people in Vietnam's largest city negotiate relations with one another, the state, the global marketplace and the spirit world through dollars and dong, On the streets of Ho Chi Minh City, remitted greenbacks cease to be the stuff of the currency trader or foreign state. Here, they take on new and distinctive roles. They mingle with their counterfeits, the one burned at cemeteries and shrines to satisfy ancestral debts, the other sent by relatives living abroad to acknowledge the debt-bond owed by those who have left the country to those who remain behind. They celebrate the transnational yet also beckon to the intimate. And, they challenge the communist party to reorder its narrative of modernity so as to maintain the primacy of its role in political and administrative affairs. As Truitt herself puts it, Dreaming of Money in Ho Chi Minh City tells a story of "monetary pluralism rather than tightly wound institutional bets, of the sensuous pleasures of cash rather than calculations of derivatives". It also tells a story of power: of the claims to power that states make through the production of territorial currency, and of how those claims are undermined by the ways that people use money for their own purposes. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Julie Billaud , "Kabul Carnival: Gender Politics in Postwar Afghanistan" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/10/julie-billaud-kabul-carnival-gender-politics-in-postwar-afghanistan-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/10/julie-billaud-kabul-carnival-gender-politics-in-postwar-afghanistan-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2015/#comments Wed, 10 Jun 2015 11:59:51 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/10/julie-billaud-kabul-carnival-gender-politics-in-postwar-afghanistan-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2015/

Julie Billaud

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Kabul Carnival: Gender Politics in Postwar Afghanistan (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015) by Julie Billaud is a fascinating account of women and the state and ongoing 'reconstruction' projects in post-war Afghanistan. The book moves through places such as gender empowerment training programmes and women's dormitories, and analyses such topics as the law and veiling in public. Subtle and engaging, Kabul Carnival is a rare and much needed anthropological insight into women's lives in Afghanistan.

]]> http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/10/julie-billaud-kabul-carnival-gender-politics-in-postwar-afghanistan-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2015/feed/ 0 0:47:06 Julie Billaud View on AmazonKabul Carnival: Gender Politics in Postwar Afghanistan (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015) by Julie Billaud is a fascinating account of women and the state and ongoing 'reconstruction' projects in post-war Afghanis[...] Julie Billaud View on AmazonKabul Carnival: Gender Politics in Postwar Afghanistan (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015) by Julie Billaud is a fascinating account of women and the state and ongoing 'reconstruction' projects in post-war Afghanistan. The book moves through places such as gender empowerment training programmes and women's dormitories, and analyses such topics as the law and veiling in public. Subtle and engaging, Kabul Carnival is a rare and much needed anthropological insight into women's lives in Afghanistan. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no Simon A. Wood and David Harrington Watt, ed.s, "Fundamentalism: Perspectives on a Contested History" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/08/simon-a-wood-and-david-h-watt-eds-fundamentalism-perspectives-on-a-contested-history-u-of-south-carolina-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/08/simon-a-wood-and-david-h-watt-eds-fundamentalism-perspectives-on-a-contested-history-u-of-south-carolina-press-2014/#comments Mon, 08 Jun 2015 15:38:37 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/08/simon-a-wood-and-david-h-watt-eds-fundamentalism-perspectives-on-a-contested-history-u-of-south-carolina-press-2014/

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In the past few decades, radical fundamentalists have become a major force in the global world. Or at least that what we often here in media outlets or from politicians and religious figures. But what exactly does 'fundamentalism' mean? Does this category point to something specific and exclude phenomena that falls outside the intended use of the term? In Fundamentalism: Perspectives on a Contested History (University of South Carolina Press, 2014) editors Simon A. Wood, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and David Harrington Watt, Professor of History at Temple University, collect a broad set of essays that address just this. They investigate the origins of the term, various communities that have been classified 'fundamentalist,' and alternative trajectories for the deployment of the label. Most often 'fundamentalism' is used to designate a position that advocates a rejection of modernity, scriptural literalism, militancy, and politicization of religion. However, under further investigation the separate communities or leaders do not always comply with these positions or approaches. Additionally, we frequently find familiar positions advocating for these standpoints without being labeled 'fundamentalist.' While not excluding other voices the editors and most of the collection's authors argue that the term 'fundamentalism' is unanchored from its American Protestant origins, obscure in its designation, and assumes religion is a separate distinct sphere of social life. Therefore, they claim it is inadequate and ineffective to employ the term as an analytical category. In our conversation we discuss early twentieth-century conservative Protestantism, Ayatollah Khomeini, American and Israeli Judaism, Islamic Education, environmental consciousness, Salafism, Sufism, Shiism, and secular societies.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/08/simon-a-wood-and-david-h-watt-eds-fundamentalism-perspectives-on-a-contested-history-u-of-south-carolina-press-2014/feed/ 0 1:02:26 View on AmazonIn the past few decades, radical fundamentalists have become a major force in the global world. Or at least that what we often here in media outlets or from politicians and religious figures. But what exactly does 'fundamentalism' mean[...] View on AmazonIn the past few decades, radical fundamentalists have become a major force in the global world. Or at least that what we often here in media outlets or from politicians and religious figures. But what exactly does 'fundamentalism' mean? Does this category point to something specific and exclude phenomena that falls outside the intended use of the term? In Fundamentalism: Perspectives on a Contested History (University of South Carolina Press, 2014) editors Simon A. Wood, Associate Professor of Religious Studies at University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and David Harrington Watt, Professor of History at Temple University, collect a broad set of essays that address just this. They investigate the origins of the term, various communities that have been classified 'fundamentalist,' and alternative trajectories for the deployment of the label. Most often 'fundamentalism' is used to designate a position that advocates a rejection of modernity, scriptural literalism, militancy, and politicization of religion. However, under further investigation the separate communities or leaders do not always comply with these positions or approaches. Additionally, we frequently find familiar positions advocating for these standpoints without being labeled 'fundamentalist.' While not excluding other voices the editors and most of the collection's authors argue that the term 'fundamentalism' is unanchored from its American Protestant origins, obscure in its designation, and assumes religion is a separate distinct sphere of social life. Therefore, they claim it is inadequate and ineffective to employ the term as an analytical category. In our conversation we discuss early twentieth-century conservative Protestantism, Ayatollah Khomeini, American and Israeli Judaism, Islamic Education, environmental consciousness, Salafism, Sufism, Shiism, and secular societies. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Kevin O'Neill, "Secure the Soul: Christian Piety and Gang Prevention in Guatemala" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/02/kevin-oneill-secure-the-soul-christian-piety-and-gang-prevention-in-guatemala-u-of-california-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/02/kevin-oneill-secure-the-soul-christian-piety-and-gang-prevention-in-guatemala-u-of-california-press-2015/#comments Tue, 02 Jun 2015 13:10:29 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/02/kevin-oneill-secure-the-soul-christian-piety-and-gang-prevention-in-guatemala-u-of-california-press-2015/

Kevin O'Neill

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Kevin O'Neill's fascinating book Secure the Soul: Christian Piety and Gang Prevention in Guatemala (University of California Press, 2015) traces the efforts of multi-million dollar programs aimed at state security through gang prevention in Guatemala.  O'Neill is most interested in the ways that Christianity and ideas about piety, salvation, redemption, and transformation guide and shape a variety of programs in prisons, rehabilitation centers, and, perhaps surprisingly, reality television and call centers. This is a finely hewn multi-sited ethnography as well as a moving account of the life of a single former gang member. At its core is a tension between the critique of programs that range from the absurd to the tragic, and a recognition that without those programs, former gang members in Guatemala would be relegated to the barest of bare lives.
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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/06/02/kevin-oneill-secure-the-soul-christian-piety-and-gang-prevention-in-guatemala-u-of-california-press-2015/feed/ 0 0:48:57 Kevin O'NeillView on AmazonKevin O'Neill's fascinating book Secure the Soul: Christian Piety and Gang Prevention in Guatemala (University of California Press, 2015) traces the efforts of multi-million dollar programs aimed at state security through[...] Kevin O'NeillView on AmazonKevin O'Neill's fascinating book Secure the Soul: Christian Piety and Gang Prevention in Guatemala (University of California Press, 2015) traces the efforts of multi-million dollar programs aimed at state security through gang prevention in Guatemala.  O'Neill is most interested in the ways that Christianity and ideas about piety, salvation, redemption, and transformation guide and shape a variety of programs in prisons, rehabilitation centers, and, perhaps surprisingly, reality television and call centers. This is a finely hewn multi-sited ethnography as well as a moving account of the life of a single former gang member. At its core is a tension between the critique of programs that range from the absurd to the tragic, and a recognition that without those programs, former gang members in Guatemala would be relegated to the barest of bare lives. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Joseph Webster, "The Anthropology of Protestantism: Faith and Crisis among Scottish Fishermen" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/29/joseph-webster-the-anthropology-of-protestantism-faith-and-crisis-among-scottish-fishermen-palgrave-macmillan-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/29/joseph-webster-the-anthropology-of-protestantism-faith-and-crisis-among-scottish-fishermen-palgrave-macmillan-2013/#comments Fri, 29 May 2015 12:16:12 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/29/joseph-webster-the-anthropology-of-protestantism-faith-and-crisis-among-scottish-fishermen-palgrave-macmillan-2013/

Joseph Webster

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In The Anthropology of Protestantism: Faith and Crisis among Scottish Fishermen (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013),  anthropologist Joseph Webster takes readers deep into the lives of fishermen in Gamrie, a village perched above the sea in northeastern Scotland. It's a place of great wealth and also poverty, a place of staunch Protestantism among many of the older people and reckless abandon or religious unconcern among the young and "incomers" – that is, new arrivals in the village. By tracing the millennialist faith of the village's many Presbyterian and Brethren churches, this careful ethnography calls into question assumptions about the decline of religion in modern societies. It asks, how do the fishermen of Gamrie experience life as both modern and enchanted?

Joseph Webster is Lecturer in Anthropology at Queen's University Belfast. The Anthropology of Protestantism comes out in paperback in June 2015.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/29/joseph-webster-the-anthropology-of-protestantism-faith-and-crisis-among-scottish-fishermen-palgrave-macmillan-2013/feed/ 0 0:56:55 Joseph WebsterView on AmazonIn The Anthropology of Protestantism: Faith and Crisis among Scottish Fishermen (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013),  anthropologist Joseph Webster takes readers deep into the lives of fishermen in Gamrie, a village perched abov[...] Joseph WebsterView on AmazonIn The Anthropology of Protestantism: Faith and Crisis among Scottish Fishermen (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013),  anthropologist Joseph Webster takes readers deep into the lives of fishermen in Gamrie, a village perched above the sea in northeastern Scotland. It's a place of great wealth and also poverty, a place of staunch Protestantism among many of the older people and reckless abandon or religious unconcern among the young and "incomers" – that is, new arrivals in the village. By tracing the millennialist faith of the village's many Presbyterian and Brethren churches, this careful ethnography calls into question assumptions about the decline of religion in modern societies. It asks, how do the fishermen of Gamrie experience life as both modern and enchanted? Joseph Webster is Lecturer in Anthropology at Queen's University Belfast. The Anthropology of Protestantism comes out in paperback in June 2015. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Todd Meyers, "The Clinic and Elsewhere: Addiction, Adolescents, and the Afterlife of Therapy" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/22/todd-meyers-the-clinic-and-elsewhere-addiction-adolescents-and-the-afterlife-of-therapy-u-of-washington-press-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/22/todd-meyers-the-clinic-and-elsewhere-addiction-adolescents-and-the-afterlife-of-therapy-u-of-washington-press-2013/#comments Fri, 22 May 2015 13:59:28 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/22/todd-meyers-the-clinic-and-elsewhere-addiction-adolescents-and-the-afterlife-of-therapy-u-of-washington-press-2013/

Todd Meyers

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Todd Meyers' The Clinic and Elsewhere: Addiction, Adolescents, and the Afterlife of Therapy (University of Washington Press, 2013) is many things, all of them compelling and fully realized. Most directly, the book is an ethnography of drug dependence and treatment among adolescents in Baltimore between 2005-2008. Meyers traces twelve people through their treatment in the clinic and beyond, into what he calls "the afterlife of therapy." The group of adolescents was diverse–their economic and family circumstances, their demographics, and arc of their narratives from addiction to treatment varied widely. Yet they shared at least one important experience: "each had either been enrolled in a clinical trial or were currently being treated with a relatively new drug for opiate withdrawal and replacement therapy: buprenorphine" (4). In this way, the book is also the story of a pharmaceutical making its way and its mark in the worlds of therapeutics, law, public opinion and, especially, in the lives of its users. Meyers shows how the lives and experiences of these adolescents (as well as others in their lives) were often shaped and constrained by their roles as subjects in pharmaceutical trials evaluating the effectiveness of buprenorphine. Moreover, Meyers looks beyond the questions and answers asked and answered under the constraints of randomized controlled trials. Rather, as he puts it, "my ethnographic gaze is fixed upon the intersection of clinical medicine and social life, at the place where medical and pharmacological subjects are constituted under the sign of therapeutics" (17). As a result, The Clinic as Elsewhere locates palpable places where medicine and the social intersect in the material world and lived experience; as readers, we see the relationship between the medical and the social as much as understand it as a conceptual given. Ultimately, Meyers shows how therapeutics is not only a form of intervention, but a "sign": under which people are constituted as subjects, and with which people "assign value, meaning, and worth assign value to pharmaceutical intervention" (116).

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/22/todd-meyers-the-clinic-and-elsewhere-addiction-adolescents-and-the-afterlife-of-therapy-u-of-washington-press-2013/feed/ 0 1:04:17 Todd MeyersView on AmazonTodd Meyers' The Clinic and Elsewhere: Addiction, Adolescents, and the Afterlife of Therapy (University of Washington Press, 2013) is many things, all of them compelling and fully realized. Most directly, the book is an ethn[...] Todd MeyersView on AmazonTodd Meyers' The Clinic and Elsewhere: Addiction, Adolescents, and the Afterlife of Therapy (University of Washington Press, 2013) is many things, all of them compelling and fully realized. Most directly, the book is an ethnography of drug dependence and treatment among adolescents in Baltimore between 2005-2008. Meyers traces twelve people through their treatment in the clinic and beyond, into what he calls "the afterlife of therapy." The group of adolescents was diverse–their economic and family circumstances, their demographics, and arc of their narratives from addiction to treatment varied widely. Yet they shared at least one important experience: "each had either been enrolled in a clinical trial or were currently being treated with a relatively new drug for opiate withdrawal and replacement therapy: buprenorphine" (4). In this way, the book is also the story of a pharmaceutical making its way and its mark in the worlds of therapeutics, law, public opinion and, especially, in the lives of its users. Meyers shows how the lives and experiences of these adolescents (as well as others in their lives) were often shaped and constrained by their roles as subjects in pharmaceutical trials evaluating the effectiveness of buprenorphine. Moreover, Meyers looks beyond the questions and answers asked and answered under the constraints of randomized controlled trials. Rather, as he puts it, "my ethnographic gaze is fixed upon the intersection of clinical medicine and social life, at the place where medical and pharmacological subjects are constituted under the sign of therapeutics" (17). As a result, The Clinic as Elsewhere locates palpable places where medicine and the social intersect in the material world and lived experience; as readers, we see the relationship between the medical and the social as much as understand it as a conceptual given. Ultimately, Meyers shows how therapeutics is not only a form of intervention, but a "sign": under which people are constituted as subjects, and with which people "assign value, meaning, and worth assign value to pharmaceutical intervention" (116). Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Benjamin Schmidt, "Inventing Exoticism: Geography, Globalism, and Europe's Early Modern World" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/19/benjamin-schmidt-inventing-exoticism-geography-globalism-and-europes-early-modern-world-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/19/benjamin-schmidt-inventing-exoticism-geography-globalism-and-europes-early-modern-world-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2015/#comments Tue, 19 May 2015 18:13:24 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/19/benjamin-schmidt-inventing-exoticism-geography-globalism-and-europes-early-modern-world-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2015/

Benjamin Schmidt

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Benjamin Schmidt's beautiful new book argues that a new form of exoticism emerged in the Netherlands between the mid-1660s and the early 1730s, thanks to a series of successful products in a broad range of media that used both text and image to engage with the non-European world. Inventing Exoticism: Geography, Globalism, and Europe's Early Modern World (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015) takes readers into the Dutch ateliers in which exotic geography was produced by bookmakers, paying special attention to frontispieces and other paratexts through which these editor-printer-booksellers created a new way of looking at the world. Picturing, here, was a kind of performance. Schmidt considers how the exotic, non-European body was produced not just in texts and pictures but also in a range of material arts that depicted the body experiencing pleasure and pain. The book concludes by looking ahead to the middle of the eighteenth century, when there was a backlash against exotic geography, and a call for more "order and method" in the geographical description of the world. Inventing Exoticism is a focused, gorgeously illustrated multi-media exploration of a topic of crucial importance to the history of the early modern world.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/19/benjamin-schmidt-inventing-exoticism-geography-globalism-and-europes-early-modern-world-u-of-pennsylvania-press-2015/feed/ 0 1:07:04 Benjamin SchmidtView on AmazonBenjamin Schmidt's beautiful new book argues that a new form of exoticism emerged in the Netherlands between the mid-1660s and the early 1730s, thanks to a series of successful products in a broad range of media that us[...] Benjamin SchmidtView on AmazonBenjamin Schmidt's beautiful new book argues that a new form of exoticism emerged in the Netherlands between the mid-1660s and the early 1730s, thanks to a series of successful products in a broad range of media that used both text and image to engage with the non-European world. Inventing Exoticism: Geography, Globalism, and Europe's Early Modern World (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015) takes readers into the Dutch ateliers in which exotic geography was produced by bookmakers, paying special attention to frontispieces and other paratexts through which these editor-printer-booksellers created a new way of looking at the world. Picturing, here, was a kind of performance. Schmidt considers how the exotic, non-European body was produced not just in texts and pictures but also in a range of material arts that depicted the body experiencing pleasure and pain. The book concludes by looking ahead to the middle of the eighteenth century, when there was a backlash against exotic geography, and a call for more "order and method" in the geographical description of the world. Inventing Exoticism is a focused, gorgeously illustrated multi-media exploration of a topic of crucial importance to the history of the early modern world. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Nicholas B. Dirks, "Autobiography of an Archive: A Scholar's Passage to India" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/18/nicholas-b-dirks-autobiography-of-an-archive-a-scholars-passage-to-india-columbia-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/18/nicholas-b-dirks-autobiography-of-an-archive-a-scholars-passage-to-india-columbia-up-2015/#comments Mon, 18 May 2015 12:19:16 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/18/nicholas-b-dirks-autobiography-of-an-archive-a-scholars-passage-to-india-columbia-up-2015/

Nicholas B. Dirks

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Nicholas B. Dirks' Autobiography of an Archive: A Scholar's Passage to India (Columbia University Press, 2015) is a wonderful collection of essays, loosely arranged along the line's of the author's scholarly life. The chapters touch upon themes such as empire and the politics of knowledge, as well as the experience of archival research. Illuminating, lucid and always challenging, Autobiography of an Archive is a stimulating and pleasurable read.

 

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/18/nicholas-b-dirks-autobiography-of-an-archive-a-scholars-passage-to-india-columbia-up-2015/feed/ 0 0:52:05 Nicholas B. DirksView on AmazonNicholas B. Dirks' Autobiography of an Archive: A Scholar's Passage to India (Columbia University Press, 2015) is a wonderful collection of essays, loosely arranged along the line's of the author's scholarly life. The [...] Nicholas B. DirksView on AmazonNicholas B. Dirks' Autobiography of an Archive: A Scholar's Passage to India (Columbia University Press, 2015) is a wonderful collection of essays, loosely arranged along the line's of the author's scholarly life. The chapters touch upon themes such as empire and the politics of knowledge, as well as the experience of archival research. Illuminating, lucid and always challenging, Autobiography of an Archive is a stimulating and pleasurable read.   Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Eben Kirksey, "The Multispecies Salon" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/10/eben-kirksey-the-multispecies-salon-duke-university-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/10/eben-kirksey-the-multispecies-salon-duke-university-press-2014/#comments Sun, 10 May 2015 22:31:38 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/10/eben-kirksey-the-multispecies-salon-duke-university-press-2014/

Eben Kirksey

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Eben Kirksey's wonderful new volume is an inspiring introduction to a kind of multispecies ethnography where artists, anthropologists, and others collaborate to create objects and experiences of great thoughtfulness and beauty. Growing out of a traveling art exhibit of the same name, The Multispecies Salon (Duke University Press, 2014) curates a collection of works that explore three major questions: "Which beings flourish, and which fail, when natural and cultural worlds intermingle and collide?" "What happens when the bodies of organisms, and even entire ecosystems, are enlisted in the schemes of biotechnology and the dreams of biocapitalism?" "…In the aftermath of disasters…what are the possibilities of biocultural hope?" Pioneering a style of collaboration inspired by Michel de Certeau's notion of "poaching," the contributions to the volume span essays on bioart and matsutake worlds, recipes for human-milk cheese and acorn mush, ruminations on the production of assmilk soap and on the nature and importance of hope, considerations of the brittlestar and the art of Patricia Piccinini, and much more. This is a volume that I will be returning to, recommending, and assigning for years to come.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/05/10/eben-kirksey-the-multispecies-salon-duke-university-press-2014/feed/ 0 1:06:47 Eben KirkseyView on AmazonEben Kirksey's wonderful new volume is an inspiring introduction to a kind of multispecies ethnography where artists, anthropologists, and others collaborate to create objects and experiences of great thoughtfulness and bea[...] Eben KirkseyView on AmazonEben Kirksey's wonderful new volume is an inspiring introduction to a kind of multispecies ethnography where artists, anthropologists, and others collaborate to create objects and experiences of great thoughtfulness and beauty. Growing out of a traveling art exhibit of the same name, The Multispecies Salon (Duke University Press, 2014) curates a collection of works that explore three major questions: "Which beings flourish, and which fail, when natural and cultural worlds intermingle and collide?" "What happens when the bodies of organisms, and even entire ecosystems, are enlisted in the schemes of biotechnology and the dreams of biocapitalism?" "…In the aftermath of disasters…what are the possibilities of biocultural hope?" Pioneering a style of collaboration inspired by Michel de Certeau's notion of "poaching," the contributions to the volume span essays on bioart and matsutake worlds, recipes for human-milk cheese and acorn mush, ruminations on the production of assmilk soap and on the nature and importance of hope, considerations of the brittlestar and the art of Patricia Piccinini, and much more. This is a volume that I will be returning to, recommending, and assigning for years to come. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Ritu G. Khanduri, "Caricaturing Culture in India: Cartoons and History in the Modern World" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/20/ritu-g-khanduri-caricaturing-culture-in-india-cartoons-and-history-in-the-modern-world-cambridge-up-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/20/ritu-g-khanduri-caricaturing-culture-in-india-cartoons-and-history-in-the-modern-world-cambridge-up-2014/#comments Mon, 20 Apr 2015 17:38:07 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/20/ritu-g-khanduri-caricaturing-culture-in-india-cartoons-and-history-in-the-modern-world-cambridge-up-2014/

Ritu G. Khanduri

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Caricaturing Culture in India: Cartoons and History in the Modern World (Cambridge University Press, 2014) is a wonderful piece of visual anthropology by Ritu Gairola Khanduri, which uses the history of cartoons, from colonial to current times, to talk about various aspects of Indian society from the state, to political society to modernity. Through archival material and fascinating discussions with cartoonists, the book reveals the various ways in which cartoons talk in India, past and present.

 

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/20/ritu-g-khanduri-caricaturing-culture-in-india-cartoons-and-history-in-the-modern-world-cambridge-up-2014/feed/ 0 0:33:42 Ritu G. KhanduriView on AmazonCaricaturing Culture in India: Cartoons and History in the Modern World (Cambridge University Press, 2014) is a wonderful piece of visual anthropology by Ritu Gairola Khanduri, which uses the history of cartoons, from c[...] Ritu G. KhanduriView on AmazonCaricaturing Culture in India: Cartoons and History in the Modern World (Cambridge University Press, 2014) is a wonderful piece of visual anthropology by Ritu Gairola Khanduri, which uses the history of cartoons, from colonial to current times, to talk about various aspects of Indian society from the state, to political society to modernity. Through archival material and fascinating discussions with cartoonists, the book reveals the various ways in which cartoons talk in India, past and present.   Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Thom van Dooren, "Flight Ways: Life and Loss at the Edge of Extinction" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/17/thom-van-dooren-flight-ways-life-and-loss-at-the-edge-of-extinction-columbia-up-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/17/thom-van-dooren-flight-ways-life-and-loss-at-the-edge-of-extinction-columbia-up-2014/#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 11:25:10 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/17/thom-van-dooren-flight-ways-life-and-loss-at-the-edge-of-extinction-columbia-up-2014/

Thom van Dooren

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Thom van Dooren's new book is an absolute must-read. (I was going to qualify that with a "…for anyone who…" and realized that it really needs no qualification.) Flight Ways: Life and Loss at the Edge of Extinction (Columbia University Press, 2014) is a beautifully written and evocative meditation on extinction. The book offers (and implicates us in) stories about five groups of birds – albatrosses, vultures, Little Penguins, whooping cranes, and Hawaiian crows – that build upon one another and collectively enable us to explore and re-imagine what, where, and how extinction is, and why that matters. Van Dooren emphasizes the importance of storytelling to understanding and inhabiting the world, and the book's five "extinction stories" each bring to life the entanglements of avian, human, and other beings to ask readers to consider a series of questions that can best be explored, understood, and engaged through attentiveness to these entanglements. "What is lost," van Dooren asks, "when a species, an evolutionary lineage, a way of life, passes from the world?" How does this loss mean, and what does it mean, within the particular multispecies community formed and shaped by that way of life? And how might storytelling, conceived as an act of witnessing, help draw us into new relationships and accountabilities within our multispecies communities? Flight Ways is deeply concerned with the ethical questions that emerge – and that must be sustained – in the course of thinking through these crucial questions, and it is committed to moving us away from a position of human exceptionalism as we work with and inside of that ethical troubling. Deeply interdisciplinary, van Dooren's book brings together approaches in animal studies and the environmental humanities, but it speaks to and from many more fields.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/17/thom-van-dooren-flight-ways-life-and-loss-at-the-edge-of-extinction-columbia-up-2014/feed/ 0 1:02:20 Thom van DoorenView on AmazonThom van Dooren's new book is an absolute must-read. (I was going to qualify that with a "…for anyone who…" and realized that it really needs no qualification.) Flight Ways: Life and Loss at the Edge of Exti[...] Thom van DoorenView on AmazonThom van Dooren's new book is an absolute must-read. (I was going to qualify that with a "…for anyone who…" and realized that it really needs no qualification.) Flight Ways: Life and Loss at the Edge of Extinction (Columbia University Press, 2014) is a beautifully written and evocative meditation on extinction. The book offers (and implicates us in) stories about five groups of birds – albatrosses, vultures, Little Penguins, whooping cranes, and Hawaiian crows – that build upon one another and collectively enable us to explore and re-imagine what, where, and how extinction is, and why that matters. Van Dooren emphasizes the importance of storytelling to understanding and inhabiting the world, and the book's five "extinction stories" each bring to life the entanglements of avian, human, and other beings to ask readers to consider a series of questions that can best be explored, understood, and engaged through attentiveness to these entanglements. "What is lost," van Dooren asks, "when a species, an evolutionary lineage, a way of life, passes from the world?" How does this loss mean, and what does it mean, within the particular multispecies community formed and shaped by that way of life? And how might storytelling, conceived as an act of witnessing, help draw us into new relationships and accountabilities within our multispecies communities? Flight Ways is deeply concerned with the ethical questions that emerge – and that must be sustained – in the course of thinking through these crucial questions, and it is committed to moving us away from a position of human exceptionalism as we work with and inside of that ethical troubling. Deeply interdisciplinary, van Dooren's book brings together approaches in animal studies and the environmental humanities, but it speaks to and from many more fields. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Ana María Ochoa Gautier, "Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Colombia" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/17/ana-maria-ochoa-gautier-aurality-listening-and-knowledge-in-nineteenth-century-colombia-duke-up-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/17/ana-maria-ochoa-gautier-aurality-listening-and-knowledge-in-nineteenth-century-colombia-duke-up-2014/#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 10:48:41 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/17/ana-maria-ochoa-gautier-aurality-listening-and-knowledge-in-nineteenth-century-colombia-duke-up-2014/

Ana María Ochoa Gautier

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Beyond what people say, what their voices sound like matters. Voice, as Ana María Ochoa Gautier argues in this marvelous new book Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth Century Colombia (Duke University Press, 2014), was embedded in 19th-century conversations and debates about the boundaries between nature and culture, between the civilized and barbaric, between inclusion or marginalization in a public civic sphere. Set in Colombia but relevant for much of Latin America and the Caribbean, the book draws on brilliant interpretations of the sonorous written archive to take up questions of sound, inscription and the epistemological and ontological status of voice. The book will prompt new formulations in both Sound Studies and Latin American Studies.
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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/17/ana-maria-ochoa-gautier-aurality-listening-and-knowledge-in-nineteenth-century-colombia-duke-up-2014/feed/ 0 0:32:28 Ana María Ochoa GautierView on AmazonBeyond what people say, what their voices sound like matters. Voice, as Ana María Ochoa Gautier argues in this marvelous new book Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth Century Colombia (Duke Univers[...] Ana María Ochoa GautierView on AmazonBeyond what people say, what their voices sound like matters. Voice, as Ana María Ochoa Gautier argues in this marvelous new book Aurality: Listening and Knowledge in Nineteenth Century Colombia (Duke University Press, 2014), was embedded in 19th-century conversations and debates about the boundaries between nature and culture, between the civilized and barbaric, between inclusion or marginalization in a public civic sphere. Set in Colombia but relevant for much of Latin America and the Caribbean, the book draws on brilliant interpretations of the sonorous written archive to take up questions of sound, inscription and the epistemological and ontological status of voice. The book will prompt new formulations in both Sound Studies and Latin American Studies. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Peter Gottschalk, "Religion, Science, and Empire: Classifying Hinduism and Islam in British India" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/13/peter-gottschalk-religion-science-and-empire-classifying-hinduism-and-islam-in-british-india-oxford-university-press-2012/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/13/peter-gottschalk-religion-science-and-empire-classifying-hinduism-and-islam-in-british-india-oxford-university-press-2012/#comments Mon, 13 Apr 2015 18:01:33 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/13/peter-gottschalk-religion-science-and-empire-classifying-hinduism-and-islam-in-british-india-oxford-university-press-2012/

Peter Gottschalk

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When did religion begin in South Asia? Many would argue that it was not until the colonial encounter that South Asians began to understand themselves as religious. In Religion, Science, and Empire: Classifying Hinduism and Islam in British India (Oxford University Press, 2012), Peter Gottschalk, Professor of Religion at Wesleyan University, outlines the contingent and mutual coalescence of science and religion as they were cultivated within the structures of empire. He demonstrates how the categories of Hindu and Muslim were constructed and applied to the residents of the Chainpur nexus of villages by the British despite the fact that these identities were not always how South Asians described themselves. Throughout this study we are made aware of the consequences of comparison and classification in the study of religion. Gottschalk engages Jonathan Z. Smith's modes of comparison demonstrating that seemingly neutral categories serve ideological purposes and forms of knowledge are not arbitrary in order. Here, we observe this work through imperial forms of knowledge production in South Asia, including the roles of cartographers, statisticians, artists, ethnographers, and photographers. In the end we witness the social consequences of British scientism and its effects on the construction of the category of religion in South Asia. In our conversation we discuss mapmaking, travel writing, Christian theology, the authority of positioning, the census, folklore studies, ethnographies, royal societies, museums, indigenous identifications, and theories for the study of religion.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/04/13/peter-gottschalk-religion-science-and-empire-classifying-hinduism-and-islam-in-british-india-oxford-university-press-2012/feed/ 0 1:02:00 Peter GottschalkView on AmazonWhen did religion begin in South Asia? Many would argue that it was not until the colonial encounter that South Asians began to understand themselves as religious. In Religion, Science, and Empire: Classifying Hinduism [...] Peter GottschalkView on AmazonWhen did religion begin in South Asia? Many would argue that it was not until the colonial encounter that South Asians began to understand themselves as religious. In Religion, Science, and Empire: Classifying Hinduism and Islam in British India (Oxford University Press, 2012), Peter Gottschalk, Professor of Religion at Wesleyan University, outlines the contingent and mutual coalescence of science and religion as they were cultivated within the structures of empire. He demonstrates how the categories of Hindu and Muslim were constructed and applied to the residents of the Chainpur nexus of villages by the British despite the fact that these identities were not always how South Asians described themselves. Throughout this study we are made aware of the consequences of comparison and classification in the study of religion. Gottschalk engages Jonathan Z. Smith's modes of comparison demonstrating that seemingly neutral categories serve ideological purposes and forms of knowledge are not arbitrary in order. Here, we observe this work through imperial forms of knowledge production in South Asia, including the roles of cartographers, statisticians, artists, ethnographers, and photographers. In the end we witness the social consequences of British scientism and its effects on the construction of the category of religion in South Asia. In our conversation we discuss mapmaking, travel writing, Christian theology, the authority of positioning, the census, folklore studies, ethnographies, royal societies, museums, indigenous identifications, and theories for the study of religion. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Jie Li, "Shanghai Homes: Palimpsests of Private Life" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/30/jie-li-shanghai-homes-palimpsests-of-private-life-columbia-up-2015/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/30/jie-li-shanghai-homes-palimpsests-of-private-life-columbia-up-2015/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 11:43:13 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/30/jie-li-shanghai-homes-palimpsests-of-private-life-columbia-up-2015/

Jie Li

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What's not to love about Jie Li's new book?

Shanghai Homes: Palimpsests of Private Life (Columbia University Press, 2015) explores the history and culture of Shanghai alleyway homes by focusing on two physical spaces, both built in the early twentieth century by Japanese and British companies, and both located in the industrial Yangshupu district in the eastern part of what was the International Settlement in Shanghai. An old house, here, is a palimpsest: Li excavates the archaeology of Shanghai's alleyway homes as a way to get at a history of privacy and private life. The homes in Li's book create and embody many kinds of private space: a nest, a foothold defined in terms of square meters, a refuge, a site for storytelling and gossip, a ruin to be destroyed or remade. As we travel through these spaces, Li introduces us to characters in from her story – and often from her family – that become, by the end of the work, people whom we're sorry to say goodbye to. In addition to being a real pleasure to read, Shanghai Homes also urges us to consider our own homes as valid sources of scholarly inquiry, models a thoughtful engagement with video and cinema as research tools, and pays careful attention to the material histories of modern urban space. The result is both a beautifully written narrative and a compelling argument for studying the archaeology of daily life.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/30/jie-li-shanghai-homes-palimpsests-of-private-life-columbia-up-2015/feed/ 0 1:09:24 Jie LiView on AmazonWhat's not to love about Jie Li's new book? Shanghai Homes: Palimpsests of Private Life (Columbia University Press, 2015) explores the history and culture of Shanghai alleyway homes by focusing on two physical spaces, both built [...] Jie LiView on AmazonWhat's not to love about Jie Li's new book? Shanghai Homes: Palimpsests of Private Life (Columbia University Press, 2015) explores the history and culture of Shanghai alleyway homes by focusing on two physical spaces, both built in the early twentieth century by Japanese and British companies, and both located in the industrial Yangshupu district in the eastern part of what was the International Settlement in Shanghai. An old house, here, is a palimpsest: Li excavates the archaeology of Shanghai's alleyway homes as a way to get at a history of privacy and private life. The homes in Li's book create and embody many kinds of private space: a nest, a foothold defined in terms of square meters, a refuge, a site for storytelling and gossip, a ruin to be destroyed or remade. As we travel through these spaces, Li introduces us to characters in from her story – and often from her family – that become, by the end of the work, people whom we're sorry to say goodbye to. In addition to being a real pleasure to read, Shanghai Homes also urges us to consider our own homes as valid sources of scholarly inquiry, models a thoughtful engagement with video and cinema as research tools, and pays careful attention to the material histories of modern urban space. The result is both a beautifully written narrative and a compelling argument for studying the archaeology of daily life. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Abdelwahab El-Affendi, "Genocidal Nightmares: Narratives of Insecurity and the Logic of Mass Atrocities" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/25/abdelwahab-el-affendi-genocidal-nightmares-bloomsbury-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/25/abdelwahab-el-affendi-genocidal-nightmares-bloomsbury-2014/#comments Wed, 25 Mar 2015 14:41:21 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/25/abdelwahab-el-affendi-genocidal-nightmares-bloomsbury-2014/

Abdelwahab El-Affendi

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Genocide studies is one of the few academic fields with which I'm acquainted which is truly interdisciplinary in approach and composition.  Today's guest Abdelwahab El-Affendi, and the book he has edited, Genocidal Nightmares: Narratives of Insecurity and the Logic of Mass Atrocities (Bloomsbury Academic 2014), is an excellent example of how this works out in practice.

The question this book addresses is not that unusual:  How it is that societies and individuals come to a place where they feel it necessary to commit mass atrocities.  But El-Affendi has assembled a set of authors remarkably varied in their background and approach. Indeed, his is one of the very few books in the field to draw on African and Middle Eastern scholars.  And the case studies he examined go well beyond the usual canon of genocide studies.

His conclusions clearly emerge out of this interdisciplinary cooperation. The book focuses on what he calls narratives of insecurity.  These are stories people tell themselves about their relationships with others, stories that both reflect and further the securitization of relationships between people.  These narratives, he argues, play a key role in moving people to commit acts they would earlier have believed unnecessary and even criminal.

The book offers a variety of well-written and considered essays.  And, if you're like me, it will acquaint you with an area of international relations theory I knew nothing about.

After we concluded the interview, Abdelwahab realized he had not mentioned in our discussion one of the key contributors to the book, the UN's Special Adviser to the Secretary General on the Prevention of  Genocide..  Deng authored the books forward and richly deserve the thanks Abdelwahab wanted to give him.  I hope this will serve as an adequate substitute for a verbal appreciation from Abdelwahab.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/25/abdelwahab-el-affendi-genocidal-nightmares-bloomsbury-2014/feed/ 0 0:57:14 Abdelwahab El-AffendiView on AmazonGenocide studies is one of the few academic fields with which I'm acquainted which is truly interdisciplinary in approach and composition.  Today's guest Abdelwahab El-Affendi, and the book he has edited, Genocida[...] Abdelwahab El-AffendiView on AmazonGenocide studies is one of the few academic fields with which I'm acquainted which is truly interdisciplinary in approach and composition.  Today's guest Abdelwahab El-Affendi, and the book he has edited, Genocidal Nightmares: Narratives of Insecurity and the Logic of Mass Atrocities (Bloomsbury Academic 2014), is an excellent example of how this works out in practice. The question this book addresses is not that unusual:  How it is that societies and individuals come to a place where they feel it necessary to commit mass atrocities.  But El-Affendi has assembled a set of authors remarkably varied in their background and approach. Indeed, his is one of the very few books in the field to draw on African and Middle Eastern scholars.  And the case studies he examined go well beyond the usual canon of genocide studies. His conclusions clearly emerge out of this interdisciplinary cooperation. The book focuses on what he calls narratives of insecurity.  These are stories people tell themselves about their relationships with others, stories that both reflect and further the securitization of relationships between people.  These narratives, he argues, play a key role in moving people to commit acts they would earlier have believed unnecessary and even criminal. The book offers a variety of well-written and considered essays.  And, if you're like me, it will acquaint you with an area of international relations theory I knew nothing about. After we concluded the interview, Abdelwahab realized he had not mentioned in our discussion one of the key contributors to the book, the UN's Special Adviser to the Secretary General on the Prevention of  Genocide..  Deng authored the books forward and richly deserve the thanks Abdelwahab wanted to give him.  I hope this will serve as an adequate substitute for a verbal appreciation from Abdelwahab. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Mukulika Banerjee, "



Why India Votes? " http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/18/mukulika-banerjee-why-india-votes-routledge-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/18/mukulika-banerjee-why-india-votes-routledge-2014/#comments Wed, 18 Mar 2015 13:22:43 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/18/mukulika-banerjee-why-india-votes-routledge-2014/

Mukulika Banerjee

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Why India Votes? (Routledge, 2014) is the latest book by Mukulika Banerjee and is a deep, engaging and continually surprising account of elections in India. Weaving together ethnographic research in fieldsites across the country, the book privileges the voice of ordinary voters as they experience the campaign, play with language and enter the polling booth. The answer to Why India Votes? is as complex as it is fascinating and the book will be of interest to scholars of South Asia and democracy, as well as general readers who want to understand the world's largest regularly organised event.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/18/mukulika-banerjee-why-india-votes-routledge-2014/feed/ 0 0:49:31 Mukulika BanerjeeView on AmazonWhy India Votes? (Routledge, 2014) is the latest book by Mukulika Banerjee and is a deep, engaging and continually surprising account of elections in India. Weaving together ethnographic research in fieldsites across t[...] Mukulika BanerjeeView on AmazonWhy India Votes? (Routledge, 2014) is the latest book by Mukulika Banerjee and is a deep, engaging and continually surprising account of elections in India. Weaving together ethnographic research in fieldsites across the country, the book privileges the voice of ordinary voters as they experience the campaign, play with language and enter the polling booth. The answer to Why India Votes? is as complex as it is fascinating and the book will be of interest to scholars of South Asia and democracy, as well as general readers who want to understand the world's largest regularly organised event. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Donna J. Drucker, "The Classification of Sex: Alfred Kinsey and the Organization of Knowledge" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/10/donna-j-drucker-the-classification-of-sex-alfred-kinsey-and-the-organization-of-knowledge-university-of-pittsburg-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/10/donna-j-drucker-the-classification-of-sex-alfred-kinsey-and-the-organization-of-knowledge-university-of-pittsburg-press-2014/#comments Tue, 10 Mar 2015 13:50:39 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/10/donna-j-drucker-the-classification-of-sex-alfred-kinsey-and-the-organization-of-knowledge-university-of-pittsburg-press-2014/

Donna J. Drucker

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Donna J. Drucker is a guest professor at Darmstadt Technical University in Germany. Her book The Classification of Sex: Alfred Kinsey and the Organization of Knowledge (University of Pittsburg Press, 2014) is an in-depth and detailed study of Kinsey's scientific approach. The book examines his career and method of gathering vast amounts of data, identifying patterns, and interpretation that was critical to his most influential works Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948) and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953). Beginning with Kinsey's study of the animal world, Drucker examines how he transferred natural science methods to sex education in his Marriage Course at Indiana University, and ultimately to the massive study of human sexual behavior. He brought into the interdisciplinary science of sexology a thoroughly naturalist approach and believed that taxonomy – collecting, classifying and describing patterns, revealed truths about the natural world and worked against what he considered the prejudice of misclassification. Kinsey was committed to scientific objectivity, free of moral judgment he believed possible through unprejudiced observation, the recording of mass data sets, and the application of biometrics. Nevertheless, Kinsey sex research had significant implications for understanding sexual difference between men and women, sexual preference tied to economic class, and the consideration of normal sexual behavior against standing societal norms. Drucker's work brings attention to the historical contingency of the social and technological process, which produces, encodes and relays information over time. Drucker's close attention to method and the role of data gathering technology again raises the question regarding the role of science in value formation and recovers Kinsey's contribution to scientific practice.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/10/donna-j-drucker-the-classification-of-sex-alfred-kinsey-and-the-organization-of-knowledge-university-of-pittsburg-press-2014/feed/ 0 0:59:16 Donna J. DruckerView on AmazonDonna J. Drucker is a guest professor at Darmstadt Technical University in Germany. Her book The Classification of Sex: Alfred Kinsey and the Organization of Knowledge (University of Pittsburg Press, 2014) is an in-dept[...] Donna J. DruckerView on AmazonDonna J. Drucker is a guest professor at Darmstadt Technical University in Germany. Her book The Classification of Sex: Alfred Kinsey and the Organization of Knowledge (University of Pittsburg Press, 2014) is an in-depth and detailed study of Kinsey's scientific approach. The book examines his career and method of gathering vast amounts of data, identifying patterns, and interpretation that was critical to his most influential works Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948) and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953). Beginning with Kinsey's study of the animal world, Drucker examines how he transferred natural science methods to sex education in his Marriage Course at Indiana University, and ultimately to the massive study of human sexual behavior. He brought into the interdisciplinary science of sexology a thoroughly naturalist approach and believed that taxonomy – collecting, classifying and describing patterns, revealed truths about the natural world and worked against what he considered the prejudice of misclassification. Kinsey was committed to scientific objectivity, free of moral judgment he believed possible through unprejudiced observation, the recording of mass data sets, and the application of biometrics. Nevertheless, Kinsey sex research had significant implications for understanding sexual difference between men and women, sexual preference tied to economic class, and the consideration of normal sexual behavior against standing societal norms. Drucker's work brings attention to the historical contingency of the social and technological process, which produces, encodes and relays information over time. Drucker's close attention to method and the role of data gathering technology again raises the question regarding the role of science in value formation and recovers Kinsey's contribution to scientific practice. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Alexander R. Galloway, "Laruelle: Against the Digital" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/05/alexander-r-galloway-laruelle-against-the-digital-university-of-minnesota-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/05/alexander-r-galloway-laruelle-against-the-digital-university-of-minnesota-press-2014/#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 18:41:38 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/05/alexander-r-galloway-laruelle-against-the-digital-university-of-minnesota-press-2014/

Alexander R. Galloway

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"The chief aim of [philosopher François Laruelle's] life's work is to consider philosophy without resorting to philosophy in order to do so."

What is non-philosophy, what would it look like to practice it, and what are the implications of doing so? Alexander R. Galloway introduces and explores these questions in a vibrant and thoughtful new book. Laruelle: Against the Digital (University of Minnesota Press, 2014) uses François Laruelle's non-philosophy as a foundation for considering the philosophical concept of digitality. In a series of ten chapters (plus intro and conclusion) and 14 theses, Galloway offers an exceptionally clear and provocative treatment of digitality as a way of thinking about and with difference. In addition to offering a critical encounter with some of the most fundamental aspects of Laruelle's work as they open up ways of thinking about identity, distinction, and exchange, the book also contains some wonderful discussions of brightness and obscurity, representation and aesthetics, computation, photography, music, ethics, and capitalism, while putting the work of Laruelle into dialogue with Deleuze, Badiou, Marx, Althusser, and others. It's an exciting work, and I will be re-reading and thinking with it for some time to come.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/05/alexander-r-galloway-laruelle-against-the-digital-university-of-minnesota-press-2014/feed/ 0 1:06:58 Alexander R. GallowayView on Amazon"The chief aim of [philosopher François Laruelle's] life's work is to consider philosophy without resorting to philosophy in order to do so." What is non-philosophy, what would it look like to practice it, and wha[...] Alexander R. GallowayView on Amazon"The chief aim of [philosopher François Laruelle's] life's work is to consider philosophy without resorting to philosophy in order to do so." What is non-philosophy, what would it look like to practice it, and what are the implications of doing so? Alexander R. Galloway introduces and explores these questions in a vibrant and thoughtful new book. Laruelle: Against the Digital (University of Minnesota Press, 2014) uses François Laruelle's non-philosophy as a foundation for considering the philosophical concept of digitality. In a series of ten chapters (plus intro and conclusion) and 14 theses, Galloway offers an exceptionally clear and provocative treatment of digitality as a way of thinking about and with difference. In addition to offering a critical encounter with some of the most fundamental aspects of Laruelle's work as they open up ways of thinking about identity, distinction, and exchange, the book also contains some wonderful discussions of brightness and obscurity, representation and aesthetics, computation, photography, music, ethics, and capitalism, while putting the work of Laruelle into dialogue with Deleuze, Badiou, Marx, Althusser, and others. It's an exciting work, and I will be re-reading and thinking with it for some time to come. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Lisa Stevenson, "Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic " http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/05/lisa-stevenson-life-beside-itself-imagining-care-in-the-canadian-arctic-university-of-california-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/05/lisa-stevenson-life-beside-itself-imagining-care-in-the-canadian-arctic-university-of-california-press-2014/#comments Thu, 05 Mar 2015 18:16:32 +0000 http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/05/lisa-stevenson-life-beside-itself-imagining-care-in-the-canadian-arctic-university-of-california-press-2014/

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Lisa Stevenson's new book opens with two throat-singing women and one listening king. Whether we hear them sitting down to a normal night's dinner (as the women) or stalking the pages of a short story from Italo Calvino's Under the Jaguar Sun (as the king), listening to these voices can potentially transform our notion of listening itself, as well as our understanding of what a "self" is and could be. Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic (University of California Press, 2014) shows us this by exploring formulations and practices of life, death, and care in a history and ethnography of Canadian policies and attitudes toward the Inuit during two epidemics, a tuberculosis epidemic (1940s-early 1960s) and a suicide epidemic (1980s-present). In juxtaposing those two cases, the book considers different forms of "care," bureaucratic and otherwise. In her archival and ethnographic research, Stevenson works as a collector of images, paying careful attention to the ways that they give meaning to life itself, even and especially amid conditions of uncertainty and confusion. The first three chapters of the book trace the practices of anonymous care that characterized the two epidemics in question, considering how the Canadian North has functioned as a massive laboratory for transforming Inuit into Canadian citizens. Whether the biopolitical project operated on tubercular or suicidal subjects, Inuit people were conceptualized as serialized bodies that needed to be brought back to health. Life Beside Itself shows that despite this, Inuit were never fully made into biopolitical subjects: instead, we come to know the friends and acquaintances that animate Stevenson's work as they cultivate multiple forms of life and of care. This is a beautiful and thoughtful book that will reward a wide range of readers, whether they come to it with an interest in health care and its histories, in the Canadian North, in forms of life and death, or simply in a moving and generously narrated story.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/03/05/lisa-stevenson-life-beside-itself-imagining-care-in-the-canadian-arctic-university-of-california-press-2014/feed/ 0 1:13:38 View on AmazonLisa Stevenson's new book opens with two throat-singing women and one listening king. Whether we hear them sitting down to a normal night's dinner (as the women) or stalking the pages of a short story from Italo Calvino's Under the Jag[...] View on AmazonLisa Stevenson's new book opens with two throat-singing women and one listening king. Whether we hear them sitting down to a normal night's dinner (as the women) or stalking the pages of a short story from Italo Calvino's Under the Jaguar Sun (as the king), listening to these voices can potentially transform our notion of listening itself, as well as our understanding of what a "self" is and could be. Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic (University of California Press, 2014) shows us this by exploring formulations and practices of life, death, and care in a history and ethnography of Canadian policies and attitudes toward the Inuit during two epidemics, a tuberculosis epidemic (1940s-early 1960s) and a suicide epidemic (1980s-present). In juxtaposing those two cases, the book considers different forms of "care," bureaucratic and otherwise. In her archival and ethnographic research, Stevenson works as a collector of images, paying careful attention to the ways that they give meaning to life itself, even and especially amid conditions of uncertainty and confusion. The first three chapters of the book trace the practices of anonymous care that characterized the two epidemics in question, considering how the Canadian North has functioned as a massive laboratory for transforming Inuit into Canadian citizens. Whether the biopolitical project operated on tubercular or suicidal subjects, Inuit people were conceptualized as serialized bodies that needed to be brought back to health. Life Beside Itself shows that despite this, Inuit were never fully made into biopolitical subjects: instead, we come to know the friends and acquaintances that animate Stevenson's work as they cultivate multiple forms of life and of care. This is a beautiful and thoughtful book that will reward a wide range of readers, whether they come to it with an interest in health care and its histories, in the Canadian North, in forms of life and death, or simply in a moving and generously narrated story. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Cabeiri Robinson, "Body of Victim, Body of Warrior: Refugee Families and the Making of Kashmiri Jihadists" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/02/19/cabeiri-robinson-body-of-victim-body-of-warrior-refugee-families-and-the-making-of-kashmiri-jihadists-university-of-california-press-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/02/19/cabeiri-robinson-body-of-victim-body-of-warrior-refugee-families-and-the-making-of-kashmiri-jihadists-university-of-california-press-2013/#comments Thu, 19 Feb 2015 13:58:54 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=345

Cabeiri Robinson

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] The idea of jihad is among the most keenly discussed yet one of the least understood concepts in Islam. In her brilliant new book Body of Victim, Body of Warrior: Refugee Families and the Making of Kashmiri Jihadists (University of California Press, 2013), Cabeiri Robinson, Associate Professor of International Studies and South Asian Studies at the University of Washington engages the question of what might an anthropology of jihad look like. By shifting the focus from theological and doctrinal discussions on the normative understandings and boundaries of jihad in Islam, Robinson instead asks the question of how people live with perennial violence in their midst? The focus of this book is on the Jihadists of the Kashmir region in the disputed borderlands between India and Pakistan, especially in relation to their experiences as refugees (muhajirs). By combining a riveting ethnography with meticulous historical analysis, Robinson documents the complex ways in which Kashmiri men and women navigate the interaction of violence, politics, and migration.  Through a careful reading of Kashmiri Jihadist discourses on human rights, the family, and martyrdom, Robinson convincingly shows that the very categories of warrior, victim, and refugee are always fluid and subject to considerable tension and contestation. In our conversation, we talked about the relationship between the categories of Jihad and Hijra as imagined by Kashmiri Jihadists, the ethical and methodological dilemmas of an ethnographer of Jihad, the mobilization of the human rights discourse by Kashmiri militant groups to legitimate violence, and the intersections of family, sexuality, and martyrdom. All students and scholars of Islam, South Asia, and modern politics must read this fascinating book that was also recently awarded the Bernard Cohn book prize for best first book in South Asian Studies by the Association for Asian Studies.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/02/19/cabeiri-robinson-body-of-victim-body-of-warrior-refugee-families-and-the-making-of-kashmiri-jihadists-university-of-california-press-2013/feed/ 0 0:54:06 Cabeiri RobinsonView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] The idea of jihad is among the most keenly discussed yet one of the least understood concepts in Islam. In her brilliant new book Body of Victim, Body of Warrior: Refug[...] Cabeiri RobinsonView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] The idea of jihad is among the most keenly discussed yet one of the least understood concepts in Islam. In her brilliant new book Body of Victim, Body of Warrior: Refugee Families and the Making of Kashmiri Jihadists (University of California Press, 2013), Cabeiri Robinson, Associate Professor of International Studies and South Asian Studies at the University of Washington engages the question of what might an anthropology of jihad look like. By shifting the focus from theological and doctrinal discussions on the normative understandings and boundaries of jihad in Islam, Robinson instead asks the question of how people live with perennial violence in their midst? The focus of this book is on the Jihadists of the Kashmir region in the disputed borderlands between India and Pakistan, especially in relation to their experiences as refugees (muhajirs). By combining a riveting ethnography with meticulous historical analysis, Robinson documents the complex ways in which Kashmiri men and women navigate the interaction of violence, politics, and migration.  Through a careful reading of Kashmiri Jihadist discourses on human rights, the family, and martyrdom, Robinson convincingly shows that the very categories of warrior, victim, and refugee are always fluid and subject to considerable tension and contestation. In our conversation, we talked about the relationship between the categories of Jihad and Hijra as imagined by Kashmiri Jihadists, the ethical and methodological dilemmas of an ethnographer of Jihad, the mobilization of the human rights discourse by Kashmiri militant groups to legitimate violence, and the intersections of family, sexuality, and martyrdom. All students and scholars of Islam, South Asia, and modern politics must read this fascinating book that was also recently awarded the Bernard Cohn book prize for best first book in South Asian Studies by the Association for Asian Studies. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Rita Denny and Patricia Sunderland, "Handbook of Anthropology in Business" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/16/rita-denny-and-patricia-sunderland-handbook-of-anthropology-in-business-left-coast-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/16/rita-denny-and-patricia-sunderland-handbook-of-anthropology-in-business-left-coast-press-2014/#comments Fri, 16 Jan 2015 16:41:50 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?p=326

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Rita Denny and Patricia Sunderland's book Handbook of Anthropology in Business (Left Coast Press, 2014) is a groundbreaking collection of essays all related to Business Anthropology. As with all interdisciplinary subjects, business anthropology has been infiltrated by other social scientists, designers and marketers. Denny and Sunderland made sure to also include those perspectives among the 60 plus authors that are featured in the handbook. This is a great reference for any anthropologist in practice, and an interesting read about the ways in which anthropology is adapting and changing. Questions about how to present anthropological findings and conduct fieldwork in a business setting are analyzed through the lenses of the academic discipline and the industry, If you have any interest in practicing anthropology, conducting ethnography, or anthropological research methods in business, this is a must have reference for your shelf.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/16/rita-denny-and-patricia-sunderland-handbook-of-anthropology-in-business-left-coast-press-2014/feed/ 0 0:36:28 View on AmazonRita Denny and Patricia Sunderland's book Handbook of Anthropology in Business (Left Coast Press, 2014) is a groundbreaking collection of essays all related to Business Anthropology. As with all interdisciplinary subjects, business a[...] View on AmazonRita Denny and Patricia Sunderland's book Handbook of Anthropology in Business (Left Coast Press, 2014) is a groundbreaking collection of essays all related to Business Anthropology. As with all interdisciplinary subjects, business anthropology has been infiltrated by other social scientists, designers and marketers. Denny and Sunderland made sure to also include those perspectives among the 60 plus authors that are featured in the handbook. This is a great reference for any anthropologist in practice, and an interesting read about the ways in which anthropology is adapting and changing. Questions about how to present anthropological findings and conduct fieldwork in a business setting are analyzed through the lenses of the academic discipline and the industry, If you have any interest in practicing anthropology, conducting ethnography, or anthropological research methods in business, this is a must have reference for your shelf. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Steven Shaviro, "The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/16/steven-shaviro-the-universe-of-things-on-speculative-realism-university-of-minnesota-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/16/steven-shaviro-the-universe-of-things-on-speculative-realism-university-of-minnesota-press-2014/#comments Fri, 16 Jan 2015 14:40:44 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=341

Steven Shaviro

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[Cross-posted from the New Books Network SeminarSteven Shaviro's new book is a wonderfully engaging study of speculative realism, new materialism, and the ways in which those fields can speak to and be informed by the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead. While The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism (University of Minnesota Press, 2014) will satisfy even advanced scholars working on "object-oriented ontology" and related issues, it's also a fantastic introduction for readers who have never heard of "correlationism" or panpsychism, don't quite understand what all of the recent humanities-wide Whitehead-related fuss is all about, and aren't sure where to begin. After a helpful introduction that lays out the major terms and stakes of the study, seven chapters each function as stand-alone units (and thus are very assignable in upper-level undergrad or graduate courses) while also progressively building on one another to collectively advance an argument for what Shaviro calls a "speculative aesthetics." The Universe of Things emphasizes the importance of aesthetics and aesthetic theory to reading and engaging the work of Whitehead, Harman, Meillassoux, Kant, Levinas, Bryant, and others as an ongoing conversation about how we understand, inhabit, and exist as part of a material world.  It's a fabulous (and fabulously clearly written!) work that I will be recommending widely to colleagues and students.

During the course of the interview we talked a bit about the opportunities that electronic and web-based media have brought to life and work in academia. On that note, you can find Steve's blog here: http://www.shaviro.com/Blog/

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/16/steven-shaviro-the-universe-of-things-on-speculative-realism-university-of-minnesota-press-2014/feed/ 0 1:01:24 Steven ShaviroView on Amazon[Cross-posted from the New Books Network Seminar] Steven Shaviro's new book is a wonderfully engaging study of speculative realism, new materialism, and the ways in which those fields can speak to and be informed by the [...] Steven ShaviroView on Amazon[Cross-posted from the New Books Network Seminar] Steven Shaviro's new book is a wonderfully engaging study of speculative realism, new materialism, and the ways in which those fields can speak to and be informed by the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead. While The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism (University of Minnesota Press, 2014) will satisfy even advanced scholars working on "object-oriented ontology" and related issues, it's also a fantastic introduction for readers who have never heard of "correlationism" or panpsychism, don't quite understand what all of the recent humanities-wide Whitehead-related fuss is all about, and aren't sure where to begin. After a helpful introduction that lays out the major terms and stakes of the study, seven chapters each function as stand-alone units (and thus are very assignable in upper-level undergrad or graduate courses) while also progressively building on one another to collectively advance an argument for what Shaviro calls a "speculative aesthetics." The Universe of Things emphasizes the importance of aesthetics and aesthetic theory to reading and engaging the work of Whitehead, Harman, Meillassoux, Kant, Levinas, Bryant, and others as an ongoing conversation about how we understand, inhabit, and exist as part of a material world.  It's a fabulous (and fabulously clearly written!) work that I will be recommending widely to colleagues and students. During the course of the interview we talked a bit about the opportunities that electronic and web-based media have brought to life and work in academia. On that note, you can find Steve's blog here: http://www.shaviro.com/Blog/ Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
S. Lochlann Jain, "Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/14/s-lochlann-jain-malignant-how-cancer-becomes-us-u-of-california-press-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/14/s-lochlann-jain-malignant-how-cancer-becomes-us-u-of-california-press-2013/#comments Wed, 14 Jan 2015 19:15:06 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=339

S. Lochlann Jain

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Medicine] Cancer pervades American bodies–and also habits of mind. Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us (University of California Press, 2013) is a sharp, adventurous book by the established legal anthropologist, S. Lochlann Jain. The book simultaneously complicates and clarifies the multiple ways in which cancer and patient-hood gets appropriated, embodied and reproduced through seemingly quotidian activities–from opening an insurance bill to enjoying yoga class. Jain shows, in other words, exactly how and in what way cancer becomes you and me.

The book draws together interviews, observations, and Jain's first-hand experience as a cancer patient, as well as a range of cultural remains, from literature to law to life tables. In doing so, Jain holds a mirror to corporate stakeholders, to everyday Americans, and to herself in order to show, paradoxically, how modern Americans reinvest in cancer in the very practices designed to promote health.

The book is a critique of the ways of life and "ways of knowing" that drive twenty-first century America–and an uncomfortable, necessary look at ourselves. Just when you think scholars have protested too much about the hidden costs of better health, Jain shows that Americans have not protested nearly enough.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/14/s-lochlann-jain-malignant-how-cancer-becomes-us-u-of-california-press-2013/feed/ 0 0:29:51 S. Lochlann JainView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Medicine] Cancer pervades American bodies–and also habits of mind. Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us (University of California Press, 2013) is a sharp, adventurous book by the e[...] S. Lochlann JainView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Medicine] Cancer pervades American bodies–and also habits of mind. Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us (University of California Press, 2013) is a sharp, adventurous book by the established legal anthropologist, S. Lochlann Jain. The book simultaneously complicates and clarifies the multiple ways in which cancer and patient-hood gets appropriated, embodied and reproduced through seemingly quotidian activities–from opening an insurance bill to enjoying yoga class. Jain shows, in other words, exactly how and in what way cancer becomes you and me. The book draws together interviews, observations, and Jain's first-hand experience as a cancer patient, as well as a range of cultural remains, from literature to law to life tables. In doing so, Jain holds a mirror to corporate stakeholders, to everyday Americans, and to herself in order to show, paradoxically, how modern Americans reinvest in cancer in the very practices designed to promote health. The book is a critique of the ways of life and "ways of knowing" that drive twenty-first century America–and an uncomfortable, necessary look at ourselves. Just when you think scholars have protested too much about the hidden costs of better health, Jain shows that Americans have not protested nearly enough. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Sarah Besky, "The Darjeeling Distinction: Labor and Justice on Fair-Trade Plantations in India" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/14/sarah-besky-the-darjeeling-distinction-labor-and-justice-on-fair-trade-plantations-in-india-u-of-california-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/14/sarah-besky-the-darjeeling-distinction-labor-and-justice-on-fair-trade-plantations-in-india-u-of-california-press-2014/#comments Wed, 14 Jan 2015 13:10:14 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=336

Sarah Besky

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[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian Studies] In this wonderful ethnography of Darjeeling tea, Sarah Besky explores different attempts at bringing justice to plantation life in north east India. Through explorations into fair trade, geographic indication and a state movement for the Nepali tea workers, Besky critically assesses the limits of projects that fail to address underlying exploitative structures. The Darjeeling Distinction: Labor and Justice on Fair-Trade Plantations in India (University of California Press, 2014) is a readable and theoretically nuanced book that should be of interest to many.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/14/sarah-besky-the-darjeeling-distinction-labor-and-justice-on-fair-trade-plantations-in-india-u-of-california-press-2014/feed/ 0 0:45:00 Sarah BeskyView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian Studies] In this wonderful ethnography of Darjeeling tea, Sarah Besky explores different attempts at bringing justice to plantation life in north east India. Through exploration[...] Sarah BeskyView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian Studies] In this wonderful ethnography of Darjeeling tea, Sarah Besky explores different attempts at bringing justice to plantation life in north east India. Through explorations into fair trade, geographic indication and a state movement for the Nepali tea workers, Besky critically assesses the limits of projects that fail to address underlying exploitative structures. The Darjeeling Distinction: Labor and Justice on Fair-Trade Plantations in India (University of California Press, 2014) is a readable and theoretically nuanced book that should be of interest to many. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
David E. Sutton, "Secrets from the Greek Kitchen: Cooking, Skill, and Everyday Life on an Aegean Island" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/13/david-e-sutton-secrets-from-the-greek-kitchen-cooking-skill-and-everyday-life-on-an-aegean-island-u-of-california-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/13/david-e-sutton-secrets-from-the-greek-kitchen-cooking-skill-and-everyday-life-on-an-aegean-island-u-of-california-press-2014/#comments Tue, 13 Jan 2015 18:59:50 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=335

David E. Sutton

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[Cross-posted from New Books in FoodDavid E. Sutton's book beguiles. Secrets From the Greek Kitchen: Cooking, Skill, and Everyday Life on an Aegean Island (University of California Press, 2014) seems like a simple chronicle of the most basic food practices on the island of Kalymnos. But what practices they are. Cutting boards are not used. Cooks cut food while holding it and the ingredients drop directly into a bowl or a pot. Just that simple action reveals a connection to what is eaten that opens up a world. It is a world worth a visit – and certainly a listen – as Prof. Sutton and I discuss some of our favorite places on earth, the ancient and ebullient islands of the Aegean sea.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/13/david-e-sutton-secrets-from-the-greek-kitchen-cooking-skill-and-everyday-life-on-an-aegean-island-u-of-california-press-2014/feed/ 0 0:51:48 David E. SuttonView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Food] David E. Sutton's book beguiles. Secrets From the Greek Kitchen: Cooking, Skill, and Everyday Life on an Aegean Island (University of California Press, 2014) seems like a simple [...] David E. SuttonView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Food] David E. Sutton's book beguiles. Secrets From the Greek Kitchen: Cooking, Skill, and Everyday Life on an Aegean Island (University of California Press, 2014) seems like a simple chronicle of the most basic food practices on the island of Kalymnos. But what practices they are. Cutting boards are not used. Cooks cut food while holding it and the ingredients drop directly into a bowl or a pot. Just that simple action reveals a connection to what is eaten that opens up a world. It is a world worth a visit – and certainly a listen – as Prof. Sutton and I discuss some of our favorite places on earth, the ancient and ebullient islands of the Aegean sea. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Matt Tomlinson, "Ritual Textuality: Pattern and Motion in Performance" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/06/matt-tomlinson-ritual-textuality-pattern-and-motion-in-performance-oxford-up-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/06/matt-tomlinson-ritual-textuality-pattern-and-motion-in-performance-oxford-up-2014/#comments Tue, 06 Jan 2015 12:47:16 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=324

Matt Tomlinson

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Religious ritual has been a staple of anthropological study. In his latest monograph, Ritual Textuality: Pattern and Motion in Performance (Oxford University Press 2014), cultural anthropologist Matt Tomlinson takes up the topic anew through a set of four case studies drawn from his fieldwork in Fiji. Each one illustrates a component of what Tomlinson calls ritual entextualization, the process by which discourse becomes texts that are detachable from their original contexts and thus replicable. Through this framework, Tomlinson explores how rituals are patterned, repeated events that are also in "motion," flexible and dynamic. Along the way, readers are introduced to linguistic performances in Pentecostal revivals, semiotic similarities between kava drinking and Christian communion, spectacles of a "happy death" in nineteenth-century missions, and political wrangling following the recent military coup d'état.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2015/01/06/matt-tomlinson-ritual-textuality-pattern-and-motion-in-performance-oxford-up-2014/feed/ 0 1:02:37 Matt TomlinsonView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Religious ritual has been a staple of anthropological study. In his latest monograph, Ritual Textuality: Pattern and Motion in Performance (Oxford University Press 2014), cultu[...] Matt TomlinsonView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Religious ritual has been a staple of anthropological study. In his latest monograph, Ritual Textuality: Pattern and Motion in Performance (Oxford University Press 2014), cultural anthropologist Matt Tomlinson takes up the topic anew through a set of four case studies drawn from his fieldwork in Fiji. Each one illustrates a component of what Tomlinson calls ritual entextualization, the process by which discourse becomes texts that are detachable from their original contexts and thus replicable. Through this framework, Tomlinson explores how rituals are patterned, repeated events that are also in "motion," flexible and dynamic. Along the way, readers are introduced to linguistic performances in Pentecostal revivals, semiotic similarities between kava drinking and Christian communion, spectacles of a "happy death" in nineteenth-century missions, and political wrangling following the recent military coup d'état. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Joseph D. Hankins, "Working Skin: Making Leather, Making a Multicultural Japan" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/31/joseph-d-hankins-working-skin-making-leather-making-a-multicultural-japan-u-of-california-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/31/joseph-d-hankins-working-skin-making-leather-making-a-multicultural-japan-u-of-california-press-2014/#comments Wed, 31 Dec 2014 16:41:51 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=323

Joseph D. Hankins

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[Cross-posted from New Books in East Asian StudiesJoseph D. Hankins's marvelous new ethnography of the contemporary Buraku people looks at the labor involved in "identifying, dismantling, and reproducing" the Buraku situation in Japan and beyond. Taking readers on a journey from Lubbock, Texas to Tokyo, India, and back again, Working Skin: Making Leather, Making a Multicultural Japan (University of California Press, 2014) brings a diverse range of ethnographic experiences to bear on understanding the conception, management, recognition, and experience of the burakumin, a "contagious category" of minority identity in today's Japan. In three major sections that each advance a particular argument, Hankins's book considers the production and non-production of signs of modern Buraku identity. These fascinating chapters offer thoughtful accounts of the making and remaking of bodily markers and ties of kinship, occupation, and residence that can be mobilized to make Buraku identity, the political strategies and embodied practices through which abstract ideals like "multiculturalism" and "human rights" are produced in that context, and the ways that international legal standards and political solidarity have been mobilized in the course of the labor that produces Buraku selfhood and otherhood. Working Skin also pays special attention to the ways that an impulse toward multiculturalism disciplines the subjects and objects of contemporary representations of social difference in Japan.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/31/joseph-d-hankins-working-skin-making-leather-making-a-multicultural-japan-u-of-california-press-2014/feed/ 0 1:08:13 Joseph D. HankinsView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in East Asian Studies] Joseph D. Hankins's marvelous new ethnography of the contemporary Buraku people looks at the labor involved in "identifying, dismantling, and reproducing" the Buraku[...] Joseph D. HankinsView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in East Asian Studies] Joseph D. Hankins's marvelous new ethnography of the contemporary Buraku people looks at the labor involved in "identifying, dismantling, and reproducing" the Buraku situation in Japan and beyond. Taking readers on a journey from Lubbock, Texas to Tokyo, India, and back again, Working Skin: Making Leather, Making a Multicultural Japan (University of California Press, 2014) brings a diverse range of ethnographic experiences to bear on understanding the conception, management, recognition, and experience of the burakumin, a "contagious category" of minority identity in today's Japan. In three major sections that each advance a particular argument, Hankins's book considers the production and non-production of signs of modern Buraku identity. These fascinating chapters offer thoughtful accounts of the making and remaking of bodily markers and ties of kinship, occupation, and residence that can be mobilized to make Buraku identity, the political strategies and embodied practices through which abstract ideals like "multiculturalism" and "human rights" are produced in that context, and the ways that international legal standards and political solidarity have been mobilized in the course of the labor that produces Buraku selfhood and otherhood. Working Skin also pays special attention to the ways that an impulse toward multiculturalism disciplines the subjects and objects of contemporary representations of social difference in Japan. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Alex Nading, "Mosquito Trails: Ecology, Health and the Politics of Entanglement" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/18/alex-nading-mosquito-trails-ecology-health-and-the-politics-of-entanglement-university-of-california-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/18/alex-nading-mosquito-trails-ecology-health-and-the-politics-of-entanglement-university-of-california-press-2014/#comments Thu, 18 Dec 2014 13:23:56 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=320

Alex Nading

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Latin American Studies] Dengue fever is on the rise globally. Since it is transmitted by mosquitoes which reside and reproduce in human environments, eradication efforts involve households and the people who keep them clean as well as moral and persuasive campaigns of surveillance and invigilation. In his new book Mosquito Trails: Ecology, Health and the Politics of Entanglement (University of California Press, 2014), Alex Nading follows the trails of garbage collectors and recyclers, local health care workers, and the mosquitoes themselves in this fascinating ethnography of Nicaragua's Ciudad Sandino's efforts to deal with dengue fever. He argues that these efforts are better understood as a series of entanglements and attachments that bring human and more than human actors together in intimate relationships. Nading's book offers readers new ways to think about the relationships among the state and local actors as mediated through a series of objects: houses, viruses, immune systems, insects, and allocation budgets. This is a story about stories, and how they matter to health and urban environments.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/18/alex-nading-mosquito-trails-ecology-health-and-the-politics-of-entanglement-university-of-california-press-2014/feed/ 0 0:53:42 Alex NadingView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Latin American Studies] Dengue fever is on the rise globally. Since it is transmitted by mosquitoes which reside and reproduce in human environments, eradication efforts involve households an[...] Alex NadingView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Latin American Studies] Dengue fever is on the rise globally. Since it is transmitted by mosquitoes which reside and reproduce in human environments, eradication efforts involve households and the people who keep them clean as well as moral and persuasive campaigns of surveillance and invigilation. In his new book Mosquito Trails: Ecology, Health and the Politics of Entanglement (University of California Press, 2014), Alex Nading follows the trails of garbage collectors and recyclers, local health care workers, and the mosquitoes themselves in this fascinating ethnography of Nicaragua's Ciudad Sandino's efforts to deal with dengue fever. He argues that these efforts are better understood as a series of entanglements and attachments that bring human and more than human actors together in intimate relationships. Nading's book offers readers new ways to think about the relationships among the state and local actors as mediated through a series of objects: houses, viruses, immune systems, insects, and allocation budgets. This is a story about stories, and how they matter to health and urban environments. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Daniel Cloud, "The Domestication of Language: Cultural Evolution and the Uniqueness of the Human Animal" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/16/daniel-cloud-the-domestication-of-language-columbia-up-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/16/daniel-cloud-the-domestication-of-language-columbia-up-2014/#comments Tue, 16 Dec 2014 19:02:11 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=318

Daniel Cloud

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Big Ideas] One of the most puzzling things about humans is their ability to manipulate symbols and create artifacts. Our nearest relatives in the animal kingdom–apes–have only the rudiments of these abilities: chimps don't have language and, if they have culture, it's extraordinarily primitive in comparison to the human form. What we have between apes and humans is not really a continuum; it's a break. So how did this break occur? The answer, of course, is evolutionarily. It stands to Darwinian reason that our distant ancestors must have been selected for symbolic use and cultural production, and it was in this natural selective way that they became human.

That's fine as far as it goes, but it presents us with another puzzle: why is human language and culture so astoundingly complex? In order to prosper in the so-called "era of evolutionary adaptation," neither needed to have been complex at all. A Hominin with a smallish fraction of the symbolic and cultural abilities of Homo sapiens would easily have emerged (and maybe did emerge) as a completely dominant alpha predator. Imagine, if you will, a chimp that could talk a bit and produce reasonably effective missile weapons. How much selection pressure would such a talking, armed chimp face? Not much, at least from other animals. Such an Hominin would not, ceteris paribus, need to evolve new and more complex linguistic and cultural abilities and forms.

But complex linguistic and cultural abilities and forms did evolve. So, we have to ask, where do Shakespeare and Large Hadron Colliders come from? Daniel Cloud has an answer: domestication. In his fascinating and thought-provoking new book The Domestication of Language: Cultural Evolution and the Uniqueness of the Human Animal (Columbia University Press, 2014), Cloud argues that over the millennia proto-humans and humans have been selecting mates who were good with symbols and selecting symbols themselves. This process–a kind of runaway sexual selection and domestication–rapidly (in evolutionary time-scales) produced both a huge expensive brain and an ornate culture to match. Listen in.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/16/daniel-cloud-the-domestication-of-language-columbia-up-2014/feed/ 0 0:55:08 Daniel CloudView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Big Ideas] One of the most puzzling things about humans is their ability to manipulate symbols and create artifacts. Our nearest relatives in the animal kingdom–apes–have only th[...] Daniel CloudView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Big Ideas] One of the most puzzling things about humans is their ability to manipulate symbols and create artifacts. Our nearest relatives in the animal kingdom–apes–have only the rudiments of these abilities: chimps don't have language and, if they have culture, it's extraordinarily primitive in comparison to the human form. What we have between apes and humans is not really a continuum; it's a break. So how did this break occur? The answer, of course, is evolutionarily. It stands to Darwinian reason that our distant ancestors must have been selected for symbolic use and cultural production, and it was in this natural selective way that they became human. That's fine as far as it goes, but it presents us with another puzzle: why is human language and culture so astoundingly complex? In order to prosper in the so-called "era of evolutionary adaptation," neither needed to have been complex at all. A Hominin with a smallish fraction of the symbolic and cultural abilities of Homo sapiens would easily have emerged (and maybe did emerge) as a completely dominant alpha predator. Imagine, if you will, a chimp that could talk a bit and produce reasonably effective missile weapons. How much selection pressure would such a talking, armed chimp face? Not much, at least from other animals. Such an Hominin would not, ceteris paribus, need to evolve new and more complex linguistic and cultural abilities and forms. But complex linguistic and cultural abilities and forms did evolve. So, we have to ask, where do Shakespeare and Large Hadron Colliders come from? Daniel Cloud has an answer: domestication. In his fascinating and thought-provoking new book The Domestication of Language: Cultural Evolution and the Uniqueness of the Human Animal (Columbia University Press, 2014), Cloud argues that over the millennia proto-humans and humans have been selecting mates who were good with symbols and selecting symbols themselves. This process–a kind of runaway sexual selection and domestication–rapidly (in evolutionary time-scales) produced both a huge expensive brain and an ornate culture to match. Listen in. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Thom Scott-Phillips, "Speaking Our Minds: Why Human Communication is Different, and How Language Evolved to Make it Special" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/13/thom-scott-phillips-speaking-our-minds-palgrave-macmillan-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/13/thom-scott-phillips-speaking-our-minds-palgrave-macmillan-2014/#comments Sat, 13 Dec 2014 21:58:31 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=316

Thom Scott-Phillips

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] I hope I'm not being species-centric when I say that the emergence of human language is a big deal. John Maynard Smith and Eörs Szathmáry it as one of the "major transitions in evolution", placing it in exalted company alongside the evolution of multicellularity, sociality, sexual reproduction, and various other preoccupations of ours. But the nature of the transition is hotly disputed: is there a sudden shift involving the emergence of complex syntax, or is the process more gradual and socially driven?

In his entertaining and approachable volume Speaking Our Minds (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), Thom Scott-Phillips argues for a different approach. On his view, there is a categorical difference between human language and its precursors, but the critical ingredient is ostensive-inferential communication – that is, the ability to express and recognise intentions – and this underlies the expressive power of language. His view calls for a reappraisal of the role of pragmatics in linguistics, from being a communicatively useful add-on to being much nearer the heart of the enterprise.

In this interview, we discuss the motivations and implications of this idea, for both evolutionary and more traditional approaches to linguistics, and we look at how comparative studies of other species – not only great apes, but even bacteria – might tell us something useful about the nature of human communication.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/13/thom-scott-phillips-speaking-our-minds-palgrave-macmillan-2014/feed/ 0 0:54:25 Thom Scott-PhillipsView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] I hope I'm not being species-centric when I say that the emergence of human language is a big deal. John Maynard Smith and Eörs Szathmáry it as one of the "major transiti[...] Thom Scott-PhillipsView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] I hope I'm not being species-centric when I say that the emergence of human language is a big deal. John Maynard Smith and Eörs Szathmáry it as one of the "major transitions in evolution", placing it in exalted company alongside the evolution of multicellularity, sociality, sexual reproduction, and various other preoccupations of ours. But the nature of the transition is hotly disputed: is there a sudden shift involving the emergence of complex syntax, or is the process more gradual and socially driven? In his entertaining and approachable volume Speaking Our Minds (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014), Thom Scott-Phillips argues for a different approach. On his view, there is a categorical difference between human language and its precursors, but the critical ingredient is ostensive-inferential communication – that is, the ability to express and recognise intentions – and this underlies the expressive power of language. His view calls for a reappraisal of the role of pragmatics in linguistics, from being a communicatively useful add-on to being much nearer the heart of the enterprise. In this interview, we discuss the motivations and implications of this idea, for both evolutionary and more traditional approaches to linguistics, and we look at how comparative studies of other species – not only great apes, but even bacteria – might tell us something useful about the nature of human communication. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Jamie Cross, "Dream Zones: Anticipating Capitalism and Development in India" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/12/jamie-cross-dream-zones-anticipating-capitalism-and-development-in-india-pluto-books-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/12/jamie-cross-dream-zones-anticipating-capitalism-and-development-in-india-pluto-books-2014/#comments Fri, 12 Dec 2014 12:14:38 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=314

Jamie Cross

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[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian StudiesDream Zones: Anticipating Capitalism and Development in India (Pluto Press, 2014), the excellent new book by Jamie Cross, explores the ways in which dreams of the future shape the present. Centring in and around a large Special Economic Zone in south India, the book analyses anticipation amongst politicians, managers, workers, land-owners and activists.

 

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/12/12/jamie-cross-dream-zones-anticipating-capitalism-and-development-in-india-pluto-books-2014/feed/ 0 0:52:14 Jamie CrossView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian Studies] Dream Zones: Anticipating Capitalism and Development in India (Pluto Press, 2014), the excellent new book by Jamie Cross, explores the ways in which dreams of the futur[...] Jamie CrossView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian Studies] Dream Zones: Anticipating Capitalism and Development in India (Pluto Press, 2014), the excellent new book by Jamie Cross, explores the ways in which dreams of the future shape the present. Centring in and around a large Special Economic Zone in south India, the book analyses anticipation amongst politicians, managers, workers, land-owners and activists.   Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Lisa L. Gezon, "Drug Effects: Khat in Biocultural and Socioeconomic Perspective" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/11/28/lisa-l-gezon-drug-effects-khat-in-biocultural-and-socioeconomic-perspective-left-coast-press-2012/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/11/28/lisa-l-gezon-drug-effects-khat-in-biocultural-and-socioeconomic-perspective-left-coast-press-2012/#comments Fri, 28 Nov 2014 18:53:50 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=312

Lisa L. Gezon

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Alcohol, Drugs, and Intoxicants] Khat, the fresh leaves of the plant Catha edulis, is a mild psycho-stimulant. It has been consumed in Yemen, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia for over one thousand years. Khat consumption is an important part of Yemeni social and political life.  During the early part of the twentieth century, Yemeni dockworkers brought khat to Madagascar, where  other members of the Malagasy population have adopted its use.

In her excellent book Drug Effects: Khat in Biocultural and Socioeconomic Perspective (Left Coast Press, 2012), Lisa L. Gezon, Professor and Chair in the Department of Anthropology, University of West Georgia, analyzes the production and consumption of Khat on the island nation of Madagascar.  Taking a cultural, medical, and anthropological approach, Gezon looks at the use of khat in pharmacological, cultural, political, economic and environmental contexts.  As a student of plant drugs/medicines/intoxicants, her summary of the manner in which khat's effects have been mischaracterized by many so called experts has echoes of reefer madness inspired characterizations of cannabis and its users.  Like so many drugs, khat is a powerful force in the local economy, and the factors that have allowed khat to provide income for small hold farmers rather than becoming part of a centralized and commercial monoculture are worthy of further analysis.

In addition to teaching me about the specifics of khat consumption in Madagascar, the background material provided a great primer on CMA approaches to substance use, as well as on the history, pharmacology and policy surrounding Catha edulis.

I have been thinking a great deal about the economic forces that influence the consumption and availability of drugs.  There are similarities and differences between poppy production in Afghanistan or the Golden Triangle, cannabis production in the Emerald Triangle, and khat production in Madagascar.  The peaceful and widely distributed economic benefits of smallholder farming on Madagascar make this study particularly fascinating.

Lisa Gezon was a pleasure to interview, and was very patient with my still developing interviewing skills.  Her research included extensive field work as well as research, and the book is almost encyclopedic in its synthesis of the literature, the findings of her studies as well as her excellent and insightful analysis.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/11/28/lisa-l-gezon-drug-effects-khat-in-biocultural-and-socioeconomic-perspective-left-coast-press-2012/feed/ 0 1:18:41 Lisa L. GezonView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Alcohol, Drugs, and Intoxicants] Khat, the fresh leaves of the plant Catha edulis, is a mild psycho-stimulant. It has been consumed in Yemen, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia for over o[...] Lisa L. GezonView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Alcohol, Drugs, and Intoxicants] Khat, the fresh leaves of the plant Catha edulis, is a mild psycho-stimulant. It has been consumed in Yemen, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Djibouti, Somalia for over one thousand years. Khat consumption is an important part of Yemeni social and political life.  During the early part of the twentieth century, Yemeni dockworkers brought khat to Madagascar, where  other members of the Malagasy population have adopted its use. In her excellent book Drug Effects: Khat in Biocultural and Socioeconomic Perspective (Left Coast Press, 2012), Lisa L. Gezon, Professor and Chair in the Department of Anthropology, University of West Georgia, analyzes the production and consumption of Khat on the island nation of Madagascar.  Taking a cultural, medical, and anthropological approach, Gezon looks at the use of khat in pharmacological, cultural, political, economic and environmental contexts.  As a student of plant drugs/medicines/intoxicants, her summary of the manner in which khat's effects have been mischaracterized by many so called experts has echoes of reefer madness inspired characterizations of cannabis and its users.  Like so many drugs, khat is a powerful force in the local economy, and the factors that have allowed khat to provide income for small hold farmers rather than becoming part of a centralized and commercial monoculture are worthy of further analysis. In addition to teaching me about the specifics of khat consumption in Madagascar, the background material provided a great primer on CMA approaches to substance use, as well as on the history, pharmacology and policy surrounding Catha edulis. I have been thinking a great deal about the economic forces that influence the consumption and availability of drugs.  There are similarities and differences between poppy production in Afghanistan or the Golden Triangle, cannabis production in the Emerald Triangle, and khat production in Madagascar.  The peaceful and widely distributed economic benefits of smallholder farming on Madagascar make this study particularly fascinating. Lisa Gezon was a pleasure to interview, and was very patient with my still developing interviewing skills.  Her research included extensive field work as well as research, and the book is almost encyclopedic in its synthesis of the literature, the findings of her studies as well as her excellent and insightful analysis. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Pamela Klassen, "Spirits of Protestantism: Medicine, Healing, and Liberal Christianity" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/11/27/pamela-klassen-spirits-of-protestantism-medicine-healing-and-liberal-christianity-university-of-california-press-2011/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/11/27/pamela-klassen-spirits-of-protestantism-medicine-healing-and-liberal-christianity-university-of-california-press-2011/#comments Thu, 27 Nov 2014 20:03:42 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=311

Pamela Klassen

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Christian Studies] Liberal Protestants are often dismissed as reflecting nothing more than a therapeutic culture or viewed as a measuring rod for the decline of Christian orthodoxy. Rarely have they been the subjects of anthropological inquiry. Pamela Klassen, Professor of Religion at the University of Toronto, wants to change that. Her recent book, Spirits of Protestantism: Medicine, Healing, and Liberal Christianity (University of California Press, 2011), charts a transition in liberal Protestant self-understanding over the course of the twentieth century whereby "supernatural liberalism," as Klassen calls it, enabled imaginative shifts between Christianity, science, and secularism. In the process, she explores how Protestants went from seeing themselves as Christians who combined medicine and evangelism to effect 'conversions to modernity' among others, including Native Americans and colonized people, to understanding themselves as complicit in an oftentimes racist imperialism. At the same time, they have recombined forms of healing in new ways, drawing on practices such as yoga and reiki in order to continue the search for a universalized type of wholeness – both spiritual and physical. Focusing on Canadian Protestants in the Anglican and United churches, Spirits of Protestantism combines rich historical examples and four years of ethnographic study to show how liberal Protestants have exerted a major influence in public life and even on anthropology itself.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/11/27/pamela-klassen-spirits-of-protestantism-medicine-healing-and-liberal-christianity-university-of-california-press-2011/feed/ 0 0:50:52 Pamela KlassenView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Christian Studies] Liberal Protestants are often dismissed as reflecting nothing more than a therapeutic culture or viewed as a measuring rod for the decline of Christian orthodoxy. Rarel[...] Pamela KlassenView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Christian Studies] Liberal Protestants are often dismissed as reflecting nothing more than a therapeutic culture or viewed as a measuring rod for the decline of Christian orthodoxy. Rarely have they been the subjects of anthropological inquiry. Pamela Klassen, Professor of Religion at the University of Toronto, wants to change that. Her recent book, Spirits of Protestantism: Medicine, Healing, and Liberal Christianity (University of California Press, 2011), charts a transition in liberal Protestant self-understanding over the course of the twentieth century whereby "supernatural liberalism," as Klassen calls it, enabled imaginative shifts between Christianity, science, and secularism. In the process, she explores how Protestants went from seeing themselves as Christians who combined medicine and evangelism to effect 'conversions to modernity' among others, including Native Americans and colonized people, to understanding themselves as complicit in an oftentimes racist imperialism. At the same time, they have recombined forms of healing in new ways, drawing on practices such as yoga and reiki in order to continue the search for a universalized type of wholeness – both spiritual and physical. Focusing on Canadian Protestants in the Anglican and United churches, Spirits of Protestantism combines rich historical examples and four years of ethnographic study to show how liberal Protestants have exerted a major influence in public life and even on anthropology itself. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Amrita Pande, "Wombs in Labor: Transnational Commercial Surrogacy in India" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/11/04/amrita-pande-wombs-in-labor-transnational-commercial-surrogacy-in-india-columbia-up-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/11/04/amrita-pande-wombs-in-labor-transnational-commercial-surrogacy-in-india-columbia-up-2014/#comments Tue, 04 Nov 2014 15:51:20 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=309

Amrita Pande

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[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian StudiesAmrita Pande's Wombs in Labor: Transnational Commercial Surrogacy in India (Columbia University Press 2014) is a beautiful and rich ethnography of a surrogacy clinic. The book details the surrogacy process from start to finish, exploring the intersection of production and reproduction, complicating and deepening our understanding of this particular form of labour.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/11/04/amrita-pande-wombs-in-labor-transnational-commercial-surrogacy-in-india-columbia-up-2014/feed/ 0 1:02:25 Amrita PandeView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian Studies] Amrita Pande's Wombs in Labor: Transnational Commercial Surrogacy in India (Columbia University Press 2014) is a beautiful and rich ethnography of a surrogacy clinic.[...] Amrita PandeView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in South Asian Studies] Amrita Pande's Wombs in Labor: Transnational Commercial Surrogacy in India (Columbia University Press 2014) is a beautiful and rich ethnography of a surrogacy clinic. The book details the surrogacy process from start to finish, exploring the intersection of production and reproduction, complicating and deepening our understanding of this particular form of labour. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Marcia Ochoa, "Queen for a Day: Transformistas, Beauty Queens, and the Performance of Femininity in Venezuela" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/10/30/marcia-ochoa-queen-for-a-day-transformistas-beauty-queens-and-the-performance-of-femininity-in-venezuela-duke-up-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/10/30/marcia-ochoa-queen-for-a-day-transformistas-beauty-queens-and-the-performance-of-femininity-in-venezuela-duke-up-2014/#comments Thu, 30 Oct 2014 15:44:14 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=307

Marcia Ochoa

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Latin American StudiesMarcia Ochoa's book Queen for a Day: Transformistas, Beauty Queens, and the Performance of Femininity in Venezuela (Duke University Press, 2014) is a detailed ethnography of Venezuelan modernity and nationhood that brings two kinds of feminine performances into the same analytical frame. Her focus on transformistas and beauty queens allows her to draw relationships among power, beauty, violence, and space. The book uses different orders of magnitude, moving from the national and transnational through the street and the runway and coming to rest finally on the body to work through arguments about mediation and the production of femininity. Ochoa's work contributes to scholarship on politics and gender in Venezuela by understanding them as bound together and mutually constitutive. Along the way there are some searing and moving portraits of the people who are her subjects.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/10/30/marcia-ochoa-queen-for-a-day-transformistas-beauty-queens-and-the-performance-of-femininity-in-venezuela-duke-up-2014/feed/ 0 1:01:08 Marcia OchoaView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Latin American Studies] Marcia Ochoa's book Queen for a Day: Transformistas, Beauty Queens, and the Performance of Femininity in Venezuela (Duke University Press, 2014) is a detailed ethno[...] Marcia OchoaView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Latin American Studies] Marcia Ochoa's book Queen for a Day: Transformistas, Beauty Queens, and the Performance of Femininity in Venezuela (Duke University Press, 2014) is a detailed ethnography of Venezuelan modernity and nationhood that brings two kinds of feminine performances into the same analytical frame. Her focus on transformistas and beauty queens allows her to draw relationships among power, beauty, violence, and space. The book uses different orders of magnitude, moving from the national and transnational through the street and the runway and coming to rest finally on the body to work through arguments about mediation and the production of femininity. Ochoa's work contributes to scholarship on politics and gender in Venezuela by understanding them as bound together and mutually constitutive. Along the way there are some searing and moving portraits of the people who are her subjects. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Amy Evrard, "The Moroccan Women's Rights Movement" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/10/30/amy-evrard-the-moroccan-womens-rights-movement-syracuse-university-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/10/30/amy-evrard-the-moroccan-womens-rights-movement-syracuse-university-press-2014/#comments Thu, 30 Oct 2014 13:39:50 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=306

Amy Evrard

[Cross-posted from New Book in Gender Studies] moroccanAmy Evrard's first book, The Moroccan Women's Rights Movement (Syracuse University Press, 2014), examines women's attempts to change their patriarchal society via their movement for equality and rights. At the center of Evrard's book is the 2004 reform of the Family Code known as the Mudawwana, in which Moroccan women made important gains in marriage, divorce, and custody rights. Combining historical analysis of legal codes, nuanced surveys of the complicated political arena, and richly developed stories of individual women, Evrard demonstrates how women's integration is stymied by poverty and illiteracy, as well as by nationalist and anti-modernization forces. At the same time, women activists are learning how to navigate among political and civic actors to achieve their goals, and in the process, convincing more and more Moroccan women of their rights.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/10/30/amy-evrard-the-moroccan-womens-rights-movement-syracuse-university-press-2014/feed/ 0 1:03:20 Amy Evrard[Cross-posted from New Book in Gender Studies] Amy Evrard's first book, The Moroccan Women's Rights Movement (Syracuse University Press, 2014), examines women's attempts to change their patriarchal society via their movement for equality [...] Amy Evrard[Cross-posted from New Book in Gender Studies] Amy Evrard's first book, The Moroccan Women's Rights Movement (Syracuse University Press, 2014), examines women's attempts to change their patriarchal society via their movement for equality and rights. At the center of Evrard's book is the 2004 reform of the Family Code known as the Mudawwana, in which Moroccan women made important gains in marriage, divorce, and custody rights. Combining historical analysis of legal codes, nuanced surveys of the complicated political arena, and richly developed stories of individual women, Evrard demonstrates how women's integration is stymied by poverty and illiteracy, as well as by nationalist and anti-modernization forces. At the same time, women activists are learning how to navigate among political and civic actors to achieve their goals, and in the process, convincing more and more Moroccan women of their rights. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Barbara Harriss-White, et al., "Dalits and Adivasis in India's Business Economy: Three Essays and an Atlas" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/10/23/barbara-harriss-white-dalits-and-adivasis-in-indias-business-economy-three-essays-collective-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/10/23/barbara-harriss-white-dalits-and-adivasis-in-indias-business-economy-three-essays-collective-2013/#comments Thu, 23 Oct 2014 13:01:18 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=305

dalits2Dalits and Adivasis in India's Business Economy: Three Essays and an Atlas (Three Essay Collective, 2013) is a wonderful new book by Barbara Harriss-White and small team of collaborators – Elisabetta Basile, Anita Dixit, Pinaki Joddar, Aseem Prakash and Kaushal Vidyarthee – published by the Three Essays Collective.

The book explores the ways in which economic liberalisation interacts with caste, specifically in reference to scheduled castes and scheduled tribes, otherwise known as Dalits and Adivasis. A truly unique book, both in terms of how the data has been gathered and presented, the essays are variously wide and deep and ask a host of questions to inspire future research.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/10/23/barbara-harriss-white-dalits-and-adivasis-in-indias-business-economy-three-essays-collective-2013/feed/ 0 1:07:28 Dalits and Adivasis in India's Business Economy: Three Essays and an Atlas (Three Essay Collective, 2013) is a wonderful new book by Barbara Harriss-White and small team of collaborators – Elisabetta Basile, Anita Dixit, Pinaki Joddar, Aseem[...] Dalits and Adivasis in India's Business Economy: Three Essays and an Atlas (Three Essay Collective, 2013) is a wonderful new book by Barbara Harriss-White and small team of collaborators – Elisabetta Basile, Anita Dixit, Pinaki Joddar, Aseem Prakash and Kaushal Vidyarthee – published by the Three Essays Collective. The book explores the ways in which economic liberalisation interacts with caste, specifically in reference to scheduled castes and scheduled tribes, otherwise known as Dalits and Adivasis. A truly unique book, both in terms of how the data has been gathered and presented, the essays are variously wide and deep and ask a host of questions to inspire future research. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Katherine Frank, "Plays Well in Groups: A Journey Through the World of Group Sex" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/09/15/katherine-frank-plays-well-in-groups-a-journey-through-the-world-of-group-sex-rowman-littlefield-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/09/15/katherine-frank-plays-well-in-groups-a-journey-through-the-world-of-group-sex-rowman-littlefield-2013/#comments Mon, 15 Sep 2014 10:53:41 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?p=291

Katherine Frank

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Dr. Katherine Frank's book, Plays Well in Groups: A Journey Through the World of Group Sex (Rowman and Littlefield, 2013), is a fascinating look at the taboo of group sex. Her robust research spans historical references to modern day accounts throughout cultures around the world. Dr. Frank used surveys, interviews, and ethnographic research to uncover why people participate in group sex, and what it means to them. Her work also looks at group sex in a violent setting, such as gang rape, and examines the social, political and power structures involved. Her work on group sex and the complex reaction to it, allow a behind the scenes look at a world that is often portrayed differently than it is actually experienced. Plays Well In Groups provides social, anthropological and historical detail about a world that is both feared and fantasized about. Frank's work is bold and scary, but always engaging. It is an intriguing journey into the complexity of sex and the meaning that it holds for culture and society.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/09/15/katherine-frank-plays-well-in-groups-a-journey-through-the-world-of-group-sex-rowman-littlefield-2013/feed/ 0 0:30:34 Katherine FrankView on AmazonDr. Katherine Frank's book, Plays Well in Groups: A Journey Through the World of Group Sex (Rowman and Littlefield, 2013), is a fascinating look at the taboo of group sex. Her robust research spans historical references[...] Katherine FrankView on AmazonDr. Katherine Frank's book, Plays Well in Groups: A Journey Through the World of Group Sex (Rowman and Littlefield, 2013), is a fascinating look at the taboo of group sex. Her robust research spans historical references to modern day accounts throughout cultures around the world. Dr. Frank used surveys, interviews, and ethnographic research to uncover why people participate in group sex, and what it means to them. Her work also looks at group sex in a violent setting, such as gang rape, and examines the social, political and power structures involved. Her work on group sex and the complex reaction to it, allow a behind the scenes look at a world that is often portrayed differently than it is actually experienced. Plays Well In Groups provides social, anthropological and historical detail about a world that is both feared and fantasized about. Frank's work is bold and scary, but always engaging. It is an intriguing journey into the complexity of sex and the meaning that it holds for culture and society. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Ruth Finnegan, "Communicating: The Multiple Modes of Human Communication" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/09/14/ruth-finnegan-communicating-the-multiple-modes-of-human-communication-routledge-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/09/14/ruth-finnegan-communicating-the-multiple-modes-of-human-communication-routledge-2014/#comments Sun, 14 Sep 2014 11:46:19 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=288

Ruth Finnegan

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] The name of the New Books in Language channel might hint at a disciplinary bias towards "language". So in some sense Ruth Finnegan's Communicating: the Multiple Modes of Human Communication (2nd edition; Routledge, 2014) is a departure: central to her approach is the idea that, within a broader view of human communication, language (in the linguistic sense of the word) is over-emphasised. The book sets out many more ingredients to communication, spanning the gamut of sensory modalities (and hinting at what might lie beyond) as well as considering the role of artifacts.

Although both the book and this interview ultimately take place in conventional language, Ruth Finnegan succeeds admirably in evoking the richness of multisensory experience, whether in the poetics of ancient Greece or in the storytelling practices of the Limba tribe of Sierra Leone. The book's illustrations offer some cross-modal enrichment of the experience, and I hope this interview does too. For a more direct impression, the World Oral Literature Project's homepage for Ruth Finnegan's Limba collection is here.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/09/14/ruth-finnegan-communicating-the-multiple-modes-of-human-communication-routledge-2014/feed/ 0 0:47:21 Ruth FinneganView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] The name of the New Books in Language channel might hint at a disciplinary bias towards "language". So in some sense Ruth Finnegan's Communicating: the Multiple Modes of Human C[...] Ruth FinneganView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] The name of the New Books in Language channel might hint at a disciplinary bias towards "language". So in some sense Ruth Finnegan's Communicating: the Multiple Modes of Human Communication (2nd edition; Routledge, 2014) is a departure: central to her approach is the idea that, within a broader view of human communication, language (in the linguistic sense of the word) is over-emphasised. The book sets out many more ingredients to communication, spanning the gamut of sensory modalities (and hinting at what might lie beyond) as well as considering the role of artifacts. Although both the book and this interview ultimately take place in conventional language, Ruth Finnegan succeeds admirably in evoking the richness of multisensory experience, whether in the poetics of ancient Greece or in the storytelling practices of the Limba tribe of Sierra Leone. The book's illustrations offer some cross-modal enrichment of the experience, and I hope this interview does too. For a more direct impression, the World Oral Literature Project's homepage for Ruth Finnegan's Limba collection is here. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Helene Snee, "A Cosmopolitan Journey?: Difference, Distinction and Identity Work in Gap Year Travel" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/08/12/helene-snee-a-cosmopolitan-journey-difference-distinction-and-identity-work-in-gap-year-travel-ashgate-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/08/12/helene-snee-a-cosmopolitan-journey-difference-distinction-and-identity-work-in-gap-year-travel-ashgate-2014/#comments Tue, 12 Aug 2014 14:58:24 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=285

Helene Snee

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Critical TheoryHelene Snee, a researcher at the University of Manchester, has written an excellent new book that should be essential reading for anyone interested in the modern world. The book uses the example of the 'gap year', an important moment in young people's lives, to deconstruct issues of class, cosmopolitanism and identity. Like many other aspects of contemporary life, common assumptions about travel (as opposed to tourism) or the individual experience (as opposed to patterns in social life) are taken apart in the book. The book reflects broader debates around class in British society that have been influenced by French theorist Pierre Bourdieu, such as the recent Great British Class Survey. The book situates itself in the tradition that seeks to unsettle the assumptions about taken for granted ideas about what is good judgement or good taste, asking why one form of, largely, middle class self development is privileged over others.

A Cosmopolitan Journey? Difference, Distinction and Identity Work in Gap Year Travel (Ashgate, 2014) is not just a contribution to critical theory. In order to understand the lives of the gap year individuals, Snee uses online blogs as evidence for the way that the 'gappers' tell stories that are about the places they have come from (rather than travelled to), about having 'authentic' (& potentially middle class) experiences during their travels and about being self-developing individuals. Crucially the book shows how even the word 'travelling' draws boundaries with 'tourism' to show how power and class dominance function to make it seem as if 'not everyone has the good taste to take a gap year', rather than the choice of a gap year being part of a much broader social structure.

Snee's combination of travel and tourism as a topic, using predominantly young people's experiences as an example, along with the way the text speaks directly to sociological debates between thinkers such as Bourdieu and Giddens, mark A Cosmopolitan Journey out as essential reading for a very wide audience.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/08/12/helene-snee-a-cosmopolitan-journey-difference-distinction-and-identity-work-in-gap-year-travel-ashgate-2014/feed/ 0 0:40:05 Helene SneeView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Critical Theory] Helene Snee, a researcher at the University of Manchester, has written an excellent new book that should be essential reading for anyone interested in the modern world. The b[...] Helene SneeView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Critical Theory] Helene Snee, a researcher at the University of Manchester, has written an excellent new book that should be essential reading for anyone interested in the modern world. The book uses the example of the 'gap year', an important moment in young people's lives, to deconstruct issues of class, cosmopolitanism and identity. Like many other aspects of contemporary life, common assumptions about travel (as opposed to tourism) or the individual experience (as opposed to patterns in social life) are taken apart in the book. The book reflects broader debates around class in British society that have been influenced by French theorist Pierre Bourdieu, such as the recent Great British Class Survey. The book situates itself in the tradition that seeks to unsettle the assumptions about taken for granted ideas about what is good judgement or good taste, asking why one form of, largely, middle class self development is privileged over others. A Cosmopolitan Journey? Difference, Distinction and Identity Work in Gap Year Travel (Ashgate, 2014) is not just a contribution to critical theory. In order to understand the lives of the gap year individuals, Snee uses online blogs as evidence for the way that the 'gappers' tell stories that are about the places they have come from (rather than travelled to), about having 'authentic' (& potentially middle class) experiences during their travels and about being self-developing individuals. Crucially the book shows how even the word 'travelling' draws boundaries with 'tourism' to show how power and class dominance function to make it seem as if 'not everyone has the good taste to take a gap year', rather than the choice of a gap year being part of a much broader social structure. Snee's combination of travel and tourism as a topic, using predominantly young people's experiences as an example, along with the way the text speaks directly to sociological debates between thinkers such as Bourdieu and Giddens, mark A Cosmopolitan Journey out as essential reading for a very wide audience. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Julia Sallabank, "Attitudes to Endangered Languages: Identities and Policies" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/08/10/julia-sallabank-attitudes-to-endangered-languages-identities-and-policies-cambridge-up-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/08/10/julia-sallabank-attitudes-to-endangered-languages-identities-and-policies-cambridge-up-2013/#comments Sun, 10 Aug 2014 14:10:43 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=283

Julia Sallabank

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] As linguists, we're wont to get protective about languages, whether we see them as data points in a typological analysis or a mass of different ways of seeing the world. Given a free choice, we'd always like to see them survive. Which is fine for us, because we don't necessarily have to speak them. But for a language to survive and thrive, someone has to be speaking it, and encouraging them to do so is no straightforward matter. In Attitudes to Endangered Languages: Identities and Policies (Cambridge University Press, 2013), Julia Sallabank discusses some of the issues that arise among (actual or potential) endangered-language speech communities.

She focuses on the languages of Guernsey, Jersey and the Isle of Man, and discusses how speakers relate to those languages and to the revitalisation efforts that are currently underway. She argues persuasively that we cannot treat these communities as homogeneous groups: in fact, the attitudes of the established speakers to the future of their language are potentially complex and equivocal, as revitalisation preserves the language for future generations but risks alienating the current generation from it.

In this interview, we discuss this situation, and look at the efficacy of language revitalisation measures. We explore the questions of what it means for a language to survive, to what extent change is inevitable, and the challenge of remaining objective when confronted with competing and sometimes entrenched linguistic interests.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/08/10/julia-sallabank-attitudes-to-endangered-languages-identities-and-policies-cambridge-up-2013/feed/ 0 0:43:00 Julia SallabankView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] As linguists, we're wont to get protective about languages, whether we see them as data points in a typological analysis or a mass of different ways of seeing the world. Given a[...] Julia SallabankView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] As linguists, we're wont to get protective about languages, whether we see them as data points in a typological analysis or a mass of different ways of seeing the world. Given a free choice, we'd always like to see them survive. Which is fine for us, because we don't necessarily have to speak them. But for a language to survive and thrive, someone has to be speaking it, and encouraging them to do so is no straightforward matter. In Attitudes to Endangered Languages: Identities and Policies (Cambridge University Press, 2013), Julia Sallabank discusses some of the issues that arise among (actual or potential) endangered-language speech communities. She focuses on the languages of Guernsey, Jersey and the Isle of Man, and discusses how speakers relate to those languages and to the revitalisation efforts that are currently underway. She argues persuasively that we cannot treat these communities as homogeneous groups: in fact, the attitudes of the established speakers to the future of their language are potentially complex and equivocal, as revitalisation preserves the language for future generations but risks alienating the current generation from it. In this interview, we discuss this situation, and look at the efficacy of language revitalisation measures. We explore the questions of what it means for a language to survive, to what extent change is inevitable, and the challenge of remaining objective when confronted with competing and sometimes entrenched linguistic interests. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Shabana Mir, "Muslim American Women on Campus: Undergraduate Social Life and Identity" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/08/04/shabana-mir-muslim-american-women-on-campus-undergraduate-social-life-and-identity-unc-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/08/04/shabana-mir-muslim-american-women-on-campus-undergraduate-social-life-and-identity-unc-2014/#comments Mon, 04 Aug 2014 15:28:48 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=282

Shabana Mir

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] In the post 9/11 era in which Muslims in America have increasingly felt under the surveillance of the state, media, and the larger society, how have female Muslim students on US college campuses imagined, performed, and negotiated their religious lives and identities? That is the central question that animates Dr. Shabana Mir's dazzling new book Muslim American Women on Campus: Undergraduate Social Life and Identity (University of North Carolina Press, 2014). This book was the winner of the Outstanding Book Award awarded by the National Association for Ethnic Studies.

In her book, Dr. Mir engages a number of interlocking themes such as the varied and at times competing understandings of Islam among female Muslim undergraduates, the haunting legacy of Orientalist discourse and practice on U.S. college campuses, questions of religious authority among Muslim students on campus, and contradictions of pluralism in US higher education. Through a theoretically sophisticated and compelling ethnographic study focused on the college experience of female Muslim undergraduates at George Washington University and Georgetown University in Washington DC, Dr. Mir brings into view the hopes, tensions, and aspirations that mark the intersections of their religious and academic and social lives on campus. Some of the specific issues analyzed in this book include female Muslim American understandings of and attitudes towards alcohol culture on campus, clothing and the hijab, and questions of gender and sexual relations. Dr. Mir's incredibly nuanced study shows both the diversity and complexity of the undergraduate experience for Muslim American students. This truly multidisciplinary book will be of much interest to not only scholars of Islam, American religion, gender, and anthropology, but also to anyone interested and invested US higher education.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/08/04/shabana-mir-muslim-american-women-on-campus-undergraduate-social-life-and-identity-unc-2014/feed/ 0 0:52:00 Shabana MirView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] In the post 9/11 era in which Muslims in America have increasingly felt under the surveillance of the state, media, and the larger society, how have female Muslim students o[...] Shabana MirView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Islamic Studies] In the post 9/11 era in which Muslims in America have increasingly felt under the surveillance of the state, media, and the larger society, how have female Muslim students on US college campuses imagined, performed, and negotiated their religious lives and identities? That is the central question that animates Dr. Shabana Mir's dazzling new book Muslim American Women on Campus: Undergraduate Social Life and Identity (University of North Carolina Press, 2014). This book was the winner of the Outstanding Book Award awarded by the National Association for Ethnic Studies. In her book, Dr. Mir engages a number of interlocking themes such as the varied and at times competing understandings of Islam among female Muslim undergraduates, the haunting legacy of Orientalist discourse and practice on U.S. college campuses, questions of religious authority among Muslim students on campus, and contradictions of pluralism in US higher education. Through a theoretically sophisticated and compelling ethnographic study focused on the college experience of female Muslim undergraduates at George Washington University and Georgetown University in Washington DC, Dr. Mir brings into view the hopes, tensions, and aspirations that mark the intersections of their religious and academic and social lives on campus. Some of the specific issues analyzed in this book include female Muslim American understandings of and attitudes towards alcohol culture on campus, clothing and the hijab, and questions of gender and sexual relations. Dr. Mir's incredibly nuanced study shows both the diversity and complexity of the undergraduate experience for Muslim American students. This truly multidisciplinary book will be of much interest to not only scholars of Islam, American religion, gender, and anthropology, but also to anyone interested and invested US higher education. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Toby Green, "The Rise of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade in Western Africa, 1300-1589" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/30/toby-green-the-rise-of-the-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-in-western-africa-1300-1589-cambridge-up-2011/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/30/toby-green-the-rise-of-the-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-in-western-africa-1300-1589-cambridge-up-2011/#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 15:45:18 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=281

Toby Green

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[Cross-posted from New Books in History] Slavery was pervasive in the Ancient World: you can find it in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. In Late Antiquity , however, slavery went into decline. It survived and even flourished in the Byzantine Empire and Muslim lands, yet it all but disappeared in Medieval Western and Central Europe.

Then, rather suddenly, slavery reappeared in the West, or rather in Western empires. By the early sixteenth century, Portuguese traders had laid the foundations of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. They bought or captured slaves in West Africa and then transported and  sold those slaves to plantation owners in European-controlled regions in the New World (especially Brazil, the Caribbean Basin, and Mexico).

How, one might well ask, did the trans-Atlantic slave trade emerge so quickly, seemingly from nothing? In his fascinating book The Rise of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade in Western Africa, 1300-1589 (Cambridge University Press, 2011), historian Toby Green addresses this question. His answer is subtle and multi-faceted, but it might be boiled down to this: the Portuguese traders didn't build the slave trade, they joined it, expanded it and, ultimately, transformed it. Listen in.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/30/toby-green-the-rise-of-the-trans-atlantic-slave-trade-in-western-africa-1300-1589-cambridge-up-2011/feed/ 0 0:41:59 Toby GreenView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in History] Slavery was pervasive in the Ancient World: you can find it in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. In Late Antiquity , however, slavery went into decline. It survived and even flou[...] Toby GreenView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in History] Slavery was pervasive in the Ancient World: you can find it in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, and Rome. In Late Antiquity , however, slavery went into decline. It survived and even flourished in the Byzantine Empire and Muslim lands, yet it all but disappeared in Medieval Western and Central Europe. Then, rather suddenly, slavery reappeared in the West, or rather in Western empires. By the early sixteenth century, Portuguese traders had laid the foundations of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. They bought or captured slaves in West Africa and then transported and  sold those slaves to plantation owners in European-controlled regions in the New World (especially Brazil, the Caribbean Basin, and Mexico). How, one might well ask, did the trans-Atlantic slave trade emerge so quickly, seemingly from nothing? In his fascinating book The Rise of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade in Western Africa, 1300-1589 (Cambridge University Press, 2011), historian Toby Green addresses this question. His answer is subtle and multi-faceted, but it might be boiled down to this: the Portuguese traders didn't build the slave trade, they joined it, expanded it and, ultimately, transformed it. Listen in. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Alice Conklin, "In the Museum of Man: Race, Anthropology, and Empire in France, 1850-1950" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/29/alice-conklin-in-the-museum-of-man-race-anthropology-and-empire-in-france-1850-1950-cornell-up-2013/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/29/alice-conklin-in-the-museum-of-man-race-anthropology-and-empire-in-france-1850-1950-cornell-up-2013/#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 12:06:26 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=280

Alice Conklin

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[Cross-posted with permission from Jonathan Judaken's Counterpoint on WKNO in Memphis]. Host Jonathan Judaken and author Alice Conklin discuss the thorny relationship between science, society, and empire at the high water mark of French imperialism and European fascism, as well as this neglected chapter in the international history of the human sciences.

In Memphis, and in America generally, we remain haunted by the history of "race" as a concept, and racism as a set of social practices. To gain some perspective on our local history, it is useful to take a step back, both in time and place.

Alice Conklin's newest book, In the Museum of Man: Race, Anthropology, and Empire in France, 1850-1950 (Cornell University Press, 2013), tells the story of how the discipline of anthropology and Paris' ethnographic museum par excellence, the Museum of Man, are wound into the history of racial science and colonial conquest, but also ultimately played an important part in undoing scientific racism.

The book offers new insight into the thorny relationship between science, society, and empire at the high water mark of French imperialism and European fascism, as well as recovers a neglected chapter in the international history of the human sciences.

Alice Conklin is a professor in the Department of History at Ohio State University. Her first book, A Mission to Civilize: The Republican Idea of Empire in France and West Africa, 1895-1930 (Stanford, 1997) examined the ways in which France's liberal Third Republic produced a consensus on the legitimacy of imperialism through the notion of a special "mission to civilize" – highlighting the racist and republican elements that together influenced French policy-making. The book won the 1998 Book Prize of the Berskshire Conference of Women's Historians.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/29/alice-conklin-in-the-museum-of-man-race-anthropology-and-empire-in-france-1850-1950-cornell-up-2013/feed/ 0 0:29:45 Alice ConklinView on Amazon[Cross-posted with permission from Jonathan Judaken's Counterpoint on WKNO in Memphis]. Host Jonathan Judaken and author Alice Conklin discuss the thorny relationship between science, society, and empire at the high wat[...] Alice ConklinView on Amazon[Cross-posted with permission from Jonathan Judaken's Counterpoint on WKNO in Memphis]. Host Jonathan Judaken and author Alice Conklin discuss the thorny relationship between science, society, and empire at the high water mark of French imperialism and European fascism, as well as this neglected chapter in the international history of the human sciences. In Memphis, and in America generally, we remain haunted by the history of "race" as a concept, and racism as a set of social practices. To gain some perspective on our local history, it is useful to take a step back, both in time and place. Alice Conklin's newest book, In the Museum of Man: Race, Anthropology, and Empire in France, 1850-1950 (Cornell University Press, 2013), tells the story of how the discipline of anthropology and Paris' ethnographic museum par excellence, the Museum of Man, are wound into the history of racial science and colonial conquest, but also ultimately played an important part in undoing scientific racism. The book offers new insight into the thorny relationship between science, society, and empire at the high water mark of French imperialism and European fascism, as well as recovers a neglected chapter in the international history of the human sciences. Alice Conklin is a professor in the Department of History at Ohio State University. Her first book, A Mission to Civilize: The Republican Idea of Empire in France and West Africa, 1895-1930 (Stanford, 1997) examined the ways in which France's liberal Third Republic produced a consensus on the legitimacy of imperialism through the notion of a special "mission to civilize" – highlighting the racist and republican elements that together influenced French policy-making. The book won the 1998 Book Prize of the Berskshire Conference of Women's Historians. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Tine M. Gammeltoft, "Haunting Images: A Cultural Account of Selective Reproduction in Vietnam" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/22/tine-m-gammeltoft-haunting-images-a-cultural-account-of-selective-reproduction-in-vietnam-university-of-california-press-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/22/tine-m-gammeltoft-haunting-images-a-cultural-account-of-selective-reproduction-in-vietnam-university-of-california-press-2014/#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 14:38:28 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=278

Tine M. Gammeltoft

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[Cross-posted from New Books in East Asian StudiesTine Gammeltoft's new book explores the process of reproductive decision making in contemporary Hanoi. Haunting Images: A Cultural Account of Selective Reproduction in Vietnam (University of California Press, 2014) develops an anthropology of belonging, paying special attention to the ways that women and their communities understand and make decisions based on ultrasound imaging technologies. In the course of making life-and-death decisions, the subjects of Gammeltoft's book confronted ethically demanding circumstances through which they forged moral selves. Inspired by the work of Emmanuel Levinas, Haunting Images considers their reproductive choices as acts of collective belonging, producing the subjectivities of both mother and fetus. The book considers these choices in light of the extended repercussions of Agent Orange in Vietnam, the local specificity of biopower, national concepts of "population quality," and the precarity of individual attachments to social collectives. The second half of the book follows the experiences of women who were informed via 3D ultrasound scans that the children they expected would be anomalous, tracing their choices, questions, contexts, and encounters with childhood disability.  It is a powerful and deeply affecting study

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/22/tine-m-gammeltoft-haunting-images-a-cultural-account-of-selective-reproduction-in-vietnam-university-of-california-press-2014/feed/ 0 1:06:55 Tine M. GammeltoftView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in East Asian Studies] Tine Gammeltoft's new book explores the process of reproductive decision making in contemporary Hanoi. Haunting Images: A Cultural Account of Selective Reproductio[...] Tine M. GammeltoftView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in East Asian Studies] Tine Gammeltoft's new book explores the process of reproductive decision making in contemporary Hanoi. Haunting Images: A Cultural Account of Selective Reproduction in Vietnam (University of California Press, 2014) develops an anthropology of belonging, paying special attention to the ways that women and their communities understand and make decisions based on ultrasound imaging technologies. In the course of making life-and-death decisions, the subjects of Gammeltoft's book confronted ethically demanding circumstances through which they forged moral selves. Inspired by the work of Emmanuel Levinas, Haunting Images considers their reproductive choices as acts of collective belonging, producing the subjectivities of both mother and fetus. The book considers these choices in light of the extended repercussions of Agent Orange in Vietnam, the local specificity of biopower, national concepts of "population quality," and the precarity of individual attachments to social collectives. The second half of the book follows the experiences of women who were informed via 3D ultrasound scans that the children they expected would be anomalous, tracing their choices, questions, contexts, and encounters with childhood disability.  It is a powerful and deeply affecting study Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
Kevin Schilbrack, "Philosophy and the Study of Religions: A Manifesto" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/18/kevin-schilbrack-philosophy-and-the-study-of-religions-a-manifesto-wiley-blackwell-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/18/kevin-schilbrack-philosophy-and-the-study-of-religions-a-manifesto-wiley-blackwell-2014/#comments Fri, 18 Jul 2014 17:14:54 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=275

Kevin Schilbrack

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Very often evaluative questions about cultural phenomena are avoided for more descriptive or explanatory goals when approaching religions. Traditionally, this set of concerns has been left to philosophers of religion. In Philosophy and the Study of Religions: A Manifesto (Wiley-Blackwell, 2014), Kevin Schilbrack, professor of Religious Studies at Appalachian State University, argues that philosophical approaches to the study of religions plays a central role in our understanding of both religious communities and the discipline of Religious Studies. This book offers both a critique of "Traditional Philosophy of Religion,"characterized as narrow, intellectualist, and insular, and a toolkit for achieving a global, practice-centered, and reflexive philosophical approach. With our wide-ranging goals in sight we are offered a new definition of religion that points us in a common direction for analyzing social data. Ultimately, Schilbrack positions his new evaluative approach as one branch in a tripartite methodology, complimenting more dominant descriptive and explanatory approaches. Overall, this books looks to the future of the field and offers interesting directions for others to follow. In our conversation we discuss religious practice, cognition, belief, embodiment, conceptual metaphors, definitional boundaries, 'superempirical realities,' and the ontology of "religion."

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/18/kevin-schilbrack-philosophy-and-the-study-of-religions-a-manifesto-wiley-blackwell-2014/feed/ 0 0:59:55 Kevin SchilbrackView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Very often evaluative questions about cultural phenomena are avoided for more descriptive or explanatory goals when approaching religions. Traditionally, this set of concerns h[...] Kevin SchilbrackView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Religion] Very often evaluative questions about cultural phenomena are avoided for more descriptive or explanatory goals when approaching religions. Traditionally, this set of concerns has been left to philosophers of religion. In Philosophy and the Study of Religions: A Manifesto (Wiley-Blackwell, 2014), Kevin Schilbrack, professor of Religious Studies at Appalachian State University, argues that philosophical approaches to the study of religions plays a central role in our understanding of both religious communities and the discipline of Religious Studies. This book offers both a critique of "Traditional Philosophy of Religion,"characterized as narrow, intellectualist, and insular, and a toolkit for achieving a global, practice-centered, and reflexive philosophical approach. With our wide-ranging goals in sight we are offered a new definition of religion that points us in a common direction for analyzing social data. Ultimately, Schilbrack positions his new evaluative approach as one branch in a tripartite methodology, complimenting more dominant descriptive and explanatory approaches. Overall, this books looks to the future of the field and offers interesting directions for others to follow. In our conversation we discuss religious practice, cognition, belief, embodiment, conceptual metaphors, definitional boundaries, 'superempirical realities,' and the ontology of "religion." Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no
John H. McWhorter, "The Language Hoax: Why the World Looks the Same in Any Language" http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/18/john-h-mcwhorter-the-language-hoax-why-the-world-looks-the-same-in-any-language-oxford-up-2014/ http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/18/john-h-mcwhorter-the-language-hoax-why-the-world-looks-the-same-in-any-language-oxford-up-2014/#comments Fri, 18 Jul 2014 14:35:47 +0000 http://newbooksnetwork.com/anthropology/?post_type=crosspost&p=273

John H. McWhorter

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Linguistics] The idea that the language we speak influences the way we think – sometimes referred to as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis – has had an interesting history. It's particularly associated with the idea that languages dismissed as primitive by 19th century thinkers, such as those of indigenous peoples in America and Australia, are not only as rich and complex as European languages (a now uncontroversial point) but also cause their speakers to conceive of reality in fundamentally different and more sophisticated ways.

One problem with this idea, as John McWhorter points out in his new book The Language Hoax: Why the World Looks the Same in Any Language (Oxford UP, 2014), is that, for there to be 'winners', there must also be 'losers' – people who are held back by their language. And that's a much less palatable idea, whether we think that it's Hopi or English or Chinese speakers that are the 'losers'. However, McWhorter's main objection to the Whorfian idea is not that it's unpalatable, but rather that (as the title of his book suggests) the evidence for it is sketchy. Or, more precisely, although language has been shown to influence cognition in certain ways, none of these are very substantial, and it would be a gross exaggeration to consider that speakers of different languages automatically have different worldviews.

In this interview, we talk about the political dimensions of Whorfianism, and discuss some of the evidence for effects of this kind (and how far they go). We touch upon the way in which claims about it are evaluated by linguists, and how the history of linguistics influences how the idea has developed. And we consider the implications for our own view of the world, if the consequences of language were as profound as has been argued.

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http://newbooksinanthropology.com/2014/07/18/john-h-mcwhorter-the-language-hoax-why-the-world-looks-the-same-in-any-language-oxford-up-2014/feed/ 0 0:52:14 John H. McWhorterView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Linguistics] The idea that the language we speak influences the way we think – sometimes referred to as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis – has had an interesting history. It's par[...] John H. McWhorterView on Amazon[Cross-posted from New Books in Linguistics] The idea that the language we speak influences the way we think – sometimes referred to as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis – has had an interesting history. It's particularly associated with the idea that languages dismissed as primitive by 19th century thinkers, such as those of indigenous peoples in America and Australia, are not only as rich and complex as European languages (a now uncontroversial point) but also cause their speakers to conceive of reality in fundamentally different and more sophisticated ways. One problem with this idea, as John McWhorter points out in his new book The Language Hoax: Why the World Looks the Same in Any Language (Oxford UP, 2014), is that, for there to be 'winners', there must also be 'losers' – people who are held back by their language. And that's a much less palatable idea, whether we think that it's Hopi or English or Chinese speakers that are the 'losers'. However, McWhorter's main objection to the Whorfian idea is not that it's unpalatable, but rather that (as the title of his book suggests) the evidence for it is sketchy. Or, more precisely, although language has been shown to influence cognition in certain ways, none of these are very substantial, and it would be a gross exaggeration to consider that speakers of different languages automatically have different worldviews. In this interview, we talk about the political dimensions of Whorfianism, and discuss some of the evidence for effects of this kind (and how far they go). We touch upon the way in which claims about it are evaluated by linguists, and how the history of linguistics influences how the idea has developed. And we consider the implications for our own view of the world, if the consequences of language were as profound as has been argued. Anthropologists, Anthropology New Books Network no no