Katherine FrankPlays Well in Groups: A Journey Through the World of Group Sex

Rowman & Littlefield, 2013

by Astrid Countee on September 15, 2014

Katherine Frank

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Dr. Katherine Frank’s book, Plays Well in Groups: A Journey Through the World of Group Sex (Rowman & Littlefield, 2013), is a fascinating look at the taboo of group sex. Her robust research spans historical references to modern day accounts throughout cultures around the world. Dr. Frank used surveys, interviews, and ethnographic research to uncover why people participate in group sex, and what it means to them. Her work also looks at group sex in a violent setting, such as gang rape, and examines the social, political and power structures involved. Her work on group sex and the complex reaction to it, allow a behind the scenes look at a world that is often portrayed differently than it is actually experienced. Plays Well In Groups provides social, anthropological and historical detail about a world that is both feared and fantasized about. Frank’s work is bold and scary, but always engaging. It is an intriguing journey into the complexity of sex and the meaning that it holds for culture and society.

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