Douglas BamforthThe Allen Site: A Paleoindian Camp in Southwestern Nebraska

University of New Mexico Press, 2007

by Robert Broadway on August 25, 2015

Douglas Bamforth

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It's the ultimate cold case: a mountain of 10,000-year old evidence excavated and stored in hundreds of boxes that sat unopened and nearly forgotten in the basement of a museum for nearly 60-years. The Allen Site: A Paleoindian Camp in Southwestern Nebraska  (University of New Mexico Press, 2007) by Douglas Bamforth is the site report of an early excavation in southwestern Nebraska, a Paleoindian camp site on Medicine Creek, now permanently submerged under the waters of Harry Strunk reservoir. An extraordinary example of dedication and professionalism in the field of archaeology, The Allen Site combines the work of eleven (11) contributors. Superbly written in clear, easy to understand language, and illustrated with photos, maps and drawings, The Allen Site documents the earliest presence of freshwater mussels in the Paleoindian diet, compelling evidence of Paleoindian children learning the craft of flintknapping, and intriguing evidence for Paleoindian fishing and netting. If you are interested in Paleoindian camp life, the archaeology beyond the massive bison bonebeds, this interview is a gem, and most definitely, you need a copy of The Allen Site in you library.

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